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Stephen Hutchins
10-18-2003, 09:53 AM
In Howard Chapelle's book about fishing schooners there are measured perspective drawings. Anybody here have any info or experience on how to make these drawings? I know I could do it with a cad program but I don't have access to one as I use a public computer. Thanks, Steve

Stephen Hutchins
10-18-2003, 09:53 AM
In Howard Chapelle's book about fishing schooners there are measured perspective drawings. Anybody here have any info or experience on how to make these drawings? I know I could do it with a cad program but I don't have access to one as I use a public computer. Thanks, Steve

Stephen Hutchins
10-18-2003, 09:53 AM
In Howard Chapelle's book about fishing schooners there are measured perspective drawings. Anybody here have any info or experience on how to make these drawings? I know I could do it with a cad program but I don't have access to one as I use a public computer. Thanks, Steve

TR
10-18-2003, 12:19 PM
Stephen;

If you have some familiarity with perspective drawing concepts, the Garden book, Yacht Designs,(second edition of the book mentioned above by Dave) is almost the only thing currently in print with any mention of the subject of perspective boat drawings. Your public library may help with this.

On perspective drawing, (not specifically of boats) there is Design Drawing, by Francis D.K. Ching, ISBN 0-471-28654-0. This book is very good on the various methods and concepts of perspective drafting.

Another book, Interior Design, by John Pile, includes a method for drawing an interior perspective, which is great fun that you may want to get into once you've done some exterior's.

All the best, Tad

TR
10-18-2003, 12:19 PM
Stephen;

If you have some familiarity with perspective drawing concepts, the Garden book, Yacht Designs,(second edition of the book mentioned above by Dave) is almost the only thing currently in print with any mention of the subject of perspective boat drawings. Your public library may help with this.

On perspective drawing, (not specifically of boats) there is Design Drawing, by Francis D.K. Ching, ISBN 0-471-28654-0. This book is very good on the various methods and concepts of perspective drafting.

Another book, Interior Design, by John Pile, includes a method for drawing an interior perspective, which is great fun that you may want to get into once you've done some exterior's.

All the best, Tad

TR
10-18-2003, 12:19 PM
Stephen;

If you have some familiarity with perspective drawing concepts, the Garden book, Yacht Designs,(second edition of the book mentioned above by Dave) is almost the only thing currently in print with any mention of the subject of perspective boat drawings. Your public library may help with this.

On perspective drawing, (not specifically of boats) there is Design Drawing, by Francis D.K. Ching, ISBN 0-471-28654-0. This book is very good on the various methods and concepts of perspective drafting.

Another book, Interior Design, by John Pile, includes a method for drawing an interior perspective, which is great fun that you may want to get into once you've done some exterior's.

All the best, Tad

Stephen Hutchins
10-20-2003, 11:25 AM
Thank you, guys.

Stephen Hutchins
10-20-2003, 11:25 AM
Thank you, guys.

Stephen Hutchins
10-20-2003, 11:25 AM
Thank you, guys.

Bill Perkins
10-20-2003, 11:53 AM
I'd second Tad's book recommendation ( Ching ).You can save allot of time ,and ease the learning curve by investing in a set of Lawson Perspective Charts as well( Van Nostrand Reinhold Co. ).These are grids layed out for a variety of veiwing angles , one of which will typically suit your case well enough . The 2 point perspectives work well for exterior drawings , that's what you see in Chapelles' book ; the 1 point perspectives are generally used for interiors .

[ 10-20-2003, 12:57 PM: Message edited by: Bill Perkins ]

Bill Perkins
10-20-2003, 11:53 AM
I'd second Tad's book recommendation ( Ching ).You can save allot of time ,and ease the learning curve by investing in a set of Lawson Perspective Charts as well( Van Nostrand Reinhold Co. ).These are grids layed out for a variety of veiwing angles , one of which will typically suit your case well enough . The 2 point perspectives work well for exterior drawings , that's what you see in Chapelles' book ; the 1 point perspectives are generally used for interiors .

[ 10-20-2003, 12:57 PM: Message edited by: Bill Perkins ]

Bill Perkins
10-20-2003, 11:53 AM
I'd second Tad's book recommendation ( Ching ).You can save allot of time ,and ease the learning curve by investing in a set of Lawson Perspective Charts as well( Van Nostrand Reinhold Co. ).These are grids layed out for a variety of veiwing angles , one of which will typically suit your case well enough . The 2 point perspectives work well for exterior drawings , that's what you see in Chapelles' book ; the 1 point perspectives are generally used for interiors .

[ 10-20-2003, 12:57 PM: Message edited by: Bill Perkins ]

Figment
10-20-2003, 01:24 PM
I'll third the reccommendation for Ching's book. He lays it out about as well as anyone could.

Long ago I attended a talk given by David Macaulay, who is an architect/illustrator that's published a series of BRILLIANTLY illustrated books ("Castle", "Cathedral", "The new way things work", etc). This guy is a master illustrator.
Early in the Q&A part of the talk, someone asked a question about some semi-advanced perspective drawing technique.... (I think it was about vertical vanishing points). Macaulay cut the questioner off pretty quickly. He has little regard for the "rules" of perspective drawing.

His dogma, which I think is quite valid, is that the "rules" are handy for getting things started and roughed-out, but once beyond that point we must realize that they're merely guidelines, and that the overriding principle should be to "just make it look right".

It's two-dimensional representation of a three-dimensional relationship, and as such is far more art than science.

Figment
10-20-2003, 01:24 PM
I'll third the reccommendation for Ching's book. He lays it out about as well as anyone could.

Long ago I attended a talk given by David Macaulay, who is an architect/illustrator that's published a series of BRILLIANTLY illustrated books ("Castle", "Cathedral", "The new way things work", etc). This guy is a master illustrator.
Early in the Q&A part of the talk, someone asked a question about some semi-advanced perspective drawing technique.... (I think it was about vertical vanishing points). Macaulay cut the questioner off pretty quickly. He has little regard for the "rules" of perspective drawing.

His dogma, which I think is quite valid, is that the "rules" are handy for getting things started and roughed-out, but once beyond that point we must realize that they're merely guidelines, and that the overriding principle should be to "just make it look right".

It's two-dimensional representation of a three-dimensional relationship, and as such is far more art than science.

Figment
10-20-2003, 01:24 PM
I'll third the reccommendation for Ching's book. He lays it out about as well as anyone could.

Long ago I attended a talk given by David Macaulay, who is an architect/illustrator that's published a series of BRILLIANTLY illustrated books ("Castle", "Cathedral", "The new way things work", etc). This guy is a master illustrator.
Early in the Q&A part of the talk, someone asked a question about some semi-advanced perspective drawing technique.... (I think it was about vertical vanishing points). Macaulay cut the questioner off pretty quickly. He has little regard for the "rules" of perspective drawing.

His dogma, which I think is quite valid, is that the "rules" are handy for getting things started and roughed-out, but once beyond that point we must realize that they're merely guidelines, and that the overriding principle should be to "just make it look right".

It's two-dimensional representation of a three-dimensional relationship, and as such is far more art than science.

Mike Field
10-21-2003, 12:08 AM
.
Stephen, you mentioned "measured" perspective drawings, and I'm just wondering whether you're after drawings that can actually be scaled from. True perspective drawings don't allow you to do this (without specialised equipment unlikely to be found in the normal drafting office,) as the "scale" constantly changes across the drawing.

The closest you can get to a "scalable perspective" drawing is the isometric drawing, where the lines of sight remain parallel -- there are no vanishing points. On an isometric drawing it's possible to scale off dimensions directly, as long as you scale parallel to one of the axes. (To scale something that's not parallel to an axis, you scale along two, or if necessary three, axes so as to embrace the area of interest, and then resolve the desired length using basic trigonometry.)

With objects like, say, a near-cube where the length along each of the X, Y, and Z axes is similar, the appearance of the finished drawing is reasonably close to reality. But for objects where one dimension is comparatively a good deal longer or shorter than the other two the appearance becomes considerably distorted. However, the advantage of being able to take dimensions of a three-dimensional object represented in only two dimensions on paper is considerable, and often outweighs the desirability of having the object "look" exactly right.

One of the three axes on an isometric grid is vertical, while the other two are each at 30 to the horizontal (one left- and the other right-handed.) It's possible to buy isometric-grid paper to produce such drawings on, but (unlike perspective grids) it's also easy to produce your own.
.

Mike Field
10-21-2003, 12:08 AM
.
Stephen, you mentioned "measured" perspective drawings, and I'm just wondering whether you're after drawings that can actually be scaled from. True perspective drawings don't allow you to do this (without specialised equipment unlikely to be found in the normal drafting office,) as the "scale" constantly changes across the drawing.

The closest you can get to a "scalable perspective" drawing is the isometric drawing, where the lines of sight remain parallel -- there are no vanishing points. On an isometric drawing it's possible to scale off dimensions directly, as long as you scale parallel to one of the axes. (To scale something that's not parallel to an axis, you scale along two, or if necessary three, axes so as to embrace the area of interest, and then resolve the desired length using basic trigonometry.)

With objects like, say, a near-cube where the length along each of the X, Y, and Z axes is similar, the appearance of the finished drawing is reasonably close to reality. But for objects where one dimension is comparatively a good deal longer or shorter than the other two the appearance becomes considerably distorted. However, the advantage of being able to take dimensions of a three-dimensional object represented in only two dimensions on paper is considerable, and often outweighs the desirability of having the object "look" exactly right.

One of the three axes on an isometric grid is vertical, while the other two are each at 30 to the horizontal (one left- and the other right-handed.) It's possible to buy isometric-grid paper to produce such drawings on, but (unlike perspective grids) it's also easy to produce your own.
.

Mike Field
10-21-2003, 12:08 AM
.
Stephen, you mentioned "measured" perspective drawings, and I'm just wondering whether you're after drawings that can actually be scaled from. True perspective drawings don't allow you to do this (without specialised equipment unlikely to be found in the normal drafting office,) as the "scale" constantly changes across the drawing.

The closest you can get to a "scalable perspective" drawing is the isometric drawing, where the lines of sight remain parallel -- there are no vanishing points. On an isometric drawing it's possible to scale off dimensions directly, as long as you scale parallel to one of the axes. (To scale something that's not parallel to an axis, you scale along two, or if necessary three, axes so as to embrace the area of interest, and then resolve the desired length using basic trigonometry.)

With objects like, say, a near-cube where the length along each of the X, Y, and Z axes is similar, the appearance of the finished drawing is reasonably close to reality. But for objects where one dimension is comparatively a good deal longer or shorter than the other two the appearance becomes considerably distorted. However, the advantage of being able to take dimensions of a three-dimensional object represented in only two dimensions on paper is considerable, and often outweighs the desirability of having the object "look" exactly right.

One of the three axes on an isometric grid is vertical, while the other two are each at 30 to the horizontal (one left- and the other right-handed.) It's possible to buy isometric-grid paper to produce such drawings on, but (unlike perspective grids) it's also easy to produce your own.
.

Aramas
10-21-2003, 01:42 AM
You could always consider getting a cheap 3d CAD program on CD - there's usually a way of running software even on the most anal of public systems. If it has a CD writer and you can install drivers, you can even run the CAD program from the CD and dynamically save your workfiles on it - we have that at uni, and I installed the driver on my system at home and it works fine.

The amount of time and effort involved in doing an accurate, detailed parametric view of a boat would probably be better spent learning to use the software. That way you get any view you want.

Aramas
10-21-2003, 01:42 AM
You could always consider getting a cheap 3d CAD program on CD - there's usually a way of running software even on the most anal of public systems. If it has a CD writer and you can install drivers, you can even run the CAD program from the CD and dynamically save your workfiles on it - we have that at uni, and I installed the driver on my system at home and it works fine.

The amount of time and effort involved in doing an accurate, detailed parametric view of a boat would probably be better spent learning to use the software. That way you get any view you want.

Aramas
10-21-2003, 01:42 AM
You could always consider getting a cheap 3d CAD program on CD - there's usually a way of running software even on the most anal of public systems. If it has a CD writer and you can install drivers, you can even run the CAD program from the CD and dynamically save your workfiles on it - we have that at uni, and I installed the driver on my system at home and it works fine.

The amount of time and effort involved in doing an accurate, detailed parametric view of a boat would probably be better spent learning to use the software. That way you get any view you want.