PDA

View Full Version : interesting wwii aeroplane



Paul Pless
08-31-2014, 03:52 PM
equipped as a naval minesweeper

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/8d/Dwi_wellington_front.jpg

Gerarddm
08-31-2014, 03:53 PM
WTH? How do it work?

seanz
08-31-2014, 03:57 PM
Wow.

I knew a bloke that flew on the bomber version of one of those.

seanz
08-31-2014, 03:58 PM
Airplane.... Yer getting all ozzified in your old age.

Fly-car, as they say in the North East.

S.V. Airlie
08-31-2014, 03:59 PM
WTH? How do it work?You are assuming it worked!

Paul Pless
08-31-2014, 04:01 PM
when flown at exactly 35' above sea level, the aluminum wound balsa ring was energized, and it generated a magnetic field which detonated under surface mines

Paul Pless
08-31-2014, 04:02 PM
Yer getting all ozzified in your old age.lets not go there

S.V. Airlie
08-31-2014, 04:03 PM
when flown at exactly 35' above sea level, the aluminum wound balsa ring was energized, and it generated a magnetic field which detonated under surface minesThat's the theory I guess did it work?

Nicholas Scheuer
08-31-2014, 04:03 PM
Properly illuminated. that thing might've cause quite a UFO panic in the 1950's

CK 17
08-31-2014, 04:15 PM
when flown at exactly 35' above sea level, the aluminum wound balsa ring was energized, and it generated a magnetic field which detonated under surface mines
If it did work, prolly got a lot of dents from fish as a result

seanz
08-31-2014, 04:20 PM
From Wiki


Type 418 Wellington DWI Mark I
Conversion of four Wellington Mark IAs to minesweeping (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Minesweeper_%28ship%29) aircraft. Fitted with Ford V-8 petrol engine and Mawdsley electrical generator (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electrical_generator) to induce magnetic field (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnetic_field) in a 48 ft (14.63 m) diameter loop mounted under fuselage. They had a solid nose with a bracket supporting the loop, which was also supported under the rear fuselage and the wings, outboard of the engines. DWI stood for "Directional Wireless Installation" – a cover story for the true purpose of the loop.

Dave Hadfield
08-31-2014, 04:46 PM
When I write about the vintage aircraft I fly, anything extremely British I refer to as an "aeroplane". American products -- airplane.

This one is all aeroplane, definitely, and so would be the Wellington.

http://www.hadfield.ca/VWoC/Lys1stFlight3.jpg


Dave

John B
08-31-2014, 05:39 PM
lets not go there


I've been there a few times, its not so bad. A bit hot , has stuff that will bite you for no reason.

The Bigfella
08-31-2014, 07:40 PM
When I write about the vintage aircraft I fly, anything extremely British I refer to as an "aeroplane". American products -- airplane.

This one is all aeroplane, definitely, and so would be the Wellington.

http://www.hadfield.ca/VWoC/Lys1stFlight3.jpg


Dave

Are those things called flaps, or airbrakes?

The Bigfella
08-31-2014, 07:42 PM
I've been there a few times, its not so bad. A bit hot , has stuff that will bite you for no reason.

Nah, the bities have reason. If they spot a tourist, that's reason enough.

The Bigfella
08-31-2014, 07:43 PM
The Germans had 'em too

http://evillusionist.files.wordpress.com/2012/05/ju52_3mg6e-minesweepers.jpg

http://www.ww2aircraft.net/forum/attachments/aviation/173393d1310922493t-minesweeping-aircraft-ju52-3m-750-1.jpg

http://www.ww2aircraft.net/forum/attachments/aviation/173395d1310924143t-minesweeping-aircraft-bv138c-750-2.jpg

WX
08-31-2014, 07:51 PM
Are those things called flaps, or airbrakes?

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leading-edge_slats