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jeffery
11-26-2000, 11:28 PM
Does any one know a good lowcost 24 to 36 inch band saw? I have a 12 inch and a table saw but if there was a band saw that could cut like a table saw it would be more enjoyable, as I've had one mishap with a table saw and now have a healthy reapect and keep a cutting safty sheild in place
thankyou
jefery bybee

jeffery
11-26-2000, 11:28 PM
Does any one know a good lowcost 24 to 36 inch band saw? I have a 12 inch and a table saw but if there was a band saw that could cut like a table saw it would be more enjoyable, as I've had one mishap with a table saw and now have a healthy reapect and keep a cutting safty sheild in place
thankyou
jefery bybee

jeffery
11-26-2000, 11:28 PM
Does any one know a good lowcost 24 to 36 inch band saw? I have a 12 inch and a table saw but if there was a band saw that could cut like a table saw it would be more enjoyable, as I've had one mishap with a table saw and now have a healthy reapect and keep a cutting safty sheild in place
thankyou
jefery bybee

Bob Cleek
12-08-2000, 02:40 PM
Easy answer. For about fifty or sixty bucks you can get a really nice bowsaw from any of the classy tool catalogs. It will do anything a bandsaw will and you get the exercise as well. Joking, of course. Your basic 14" Reliant/Jet/Delta/Taiwan Turkey will do the job for between $400 and $700 new. Watch the want ads... you might pick one up for a hundred or so used. I did. In the meantime, you can pick up a cordless model like I said. Not a total joke, actually. There's a lot to be said for a handsaw that is properly set and sharpened. If you aren't doing production work for money, the elbow grease is a lot cheaper and more convenient. Similarly, a good sabre/jig saw and/or a Sawsall will achieve the same results as a bandsaw for a lot less if used creatively. Nothing like a bandsaw, of course, but you always have to balance the cost/benefit analysis. There are lots of great power tools out there, for a price, but you have to always ask yourself, "How often will I really NEED this thing?" and "Do I have another tool that will do the job just this one time that I need to do it?"

Bob Cleek
12-08-2000, 02:40 PM
Easy answer. For about fifty or sixty bucks you can get a really nice bowsaw from any of the classy tool catalogs. It will do anything a bandsaw will and you get the exercise as well. Joking, of course. Your basic 14" Reliant/Jet/Delta/Taiwan Turkey will do the job for between $400 and $700 new. Watch the want ads... you might pick one up for a hundred or so used. I did. In the meantime, you can pick up a cordless model like I said. Not a total joke, actually. There's a lot to be said for a handsaw that is properly set and sharpened. If you aren't doing production work for money, the elbow grease is a lot cheaper and more convenient. Similarly, a good sabre/jig saw and/or a Sawsall will achieve the same results as a bandsaw for a lot less if used creatively. Nothing like a bandsaw, of course, but you always have to balance the cost/benefit analysis. There are lots of great power tools out there, for a price, but you have to always ask yourself, "How often will I really NEED this thing?" and "Do I have another tool that will do the job just this one time that I need to do it?"

Bob Cleek
12-08-2000, 02:40 PM
Easy answer. For about fifty or sixty bucks you can get a really nice bowsaw from any of the classy tool catalogs. It will do anything a bandsaw will and you get the exercise as well. Joking, of course. Your basic 14" Reliant/Jet/Delta/Taiwan Turkey will do the job for between $400 and $700 new. Watch the want ads... you might pick one up for a hundred or so used. I did. In the meantime, you can pick up a cordless model like I said. Not a total joke, actually. There's a lot to be said for a handsaw that is properly set and sharpened. If you aren't doing production work for money, the elbow grease is a lot cheaper and more convenient. Similarly, a good sabre/jig saw and/or a Sawsall will achieve the same results as a bandsaw for a lot less if used creatively. Nothing like a bandsaw, of course, but you always have to balance the cost/benefit analysis. There are lots of great power tools out there, for a price, but you have to always ask yourself, "How often will I really NEED this thing?" and "Do I have another tool that will do the job just this one time that I need to do it?"

ishmael
12-08-2000, 03:05 PM
To follow up on Bob's post, what do you need a 36" bandsaw for?

The important thing with a table saw is to always be ready to retreat. Any close work (ie hands close to the back of the blade) means you need to hold the stock with that retreat in mind. The guards are just a PITA. Push sticks and feather boards a skill it's very good to learn.

That said, the closest I've come to serious injury, after ten years working with many manner of tools, was with a table saw kick. Statistics, saying bandsaws are more dangerous to fingers, may be factually accurate, but don't go far enough. I think any one who works commercially with a table saw, regards it with utmost respect...bandsaws...it takes a real bone head move to lose a finger.

Best, Ishmael

ishmael
12-08-2000, 03:05 PM
To follow up on Bob's post, what do you need a 36" bandsaw for?

The important thing with a table saw is to always be ready to retreat. Any close work (ie hands close to the back of the blade) means you need to hold the stock with that retreat in mind. The guards are just a PITA. Push sticks and feather boards a skill it's very good to learn.

That said, the closest I've come to serious injury, after ten years working with many manner of tools, was with a table saw kick. Statistics, saying bandsaws are more dangerous to fingers, may be factually accurate, but don't go far enough. I think any one who works commercially with a table saw, regards it with utmost respect...bandsaws...it takes a real bone head move to lose a finger.

Best, Ishmael

ishmael
12-08-2000, 03:05 PM
To follow up on Bob's post, what do you need a 36" bandsaw for?

The important thing with a table saw is to always be ready to retreat. Any close work (ie hands close to the back of the blade) means you need to hold the stock with that retreat in mind. The guards are just a PITA. Push sticks and feather boards a skill it's very good to learn.

That said, the closest I've come to serious injury, after ten years working with many manner of tools, was with a table saw kick. Statistics, saying bandsaws are more dangerous to fingers, may be factually accurate, but don't go far enough. I think any one who works commercially with a table saw, regards it with utmost respect...bandsaws...it takes a real bone head move to lose a finger.

Best, Ishmael

Jamie Hascall
12-08-2000, 07:25 PM
I'd try to get on the mailing lists of all the industrial auction companies for the region. Seeing that you're in Utah, there should be timber products companies still going belly up. As much as I hate to take advantage of peoples misfortune, it can be a great place to get a tool like a big band saw since nobody wants to transport the durn thing. The older and bigger it is, the cheaper it should be per lb. Uh, you do have a whole load of buddies and a big truck don't you?

Good Luck

Jamie

Jamie Hascall
12-08-2000, 07:25 PM
I'd try to get on the mailing lists of all the industrial auction companies for the region. Seeing that you're in Utah, there should be timber products companies still going belly up. As much as I hate to take advantage of peoples misfortune, it can be a great place to get a tool like a big band saw since nobody wants to transport the durn thing. The older and bigger it is, the cheaper it should be per lb. Uh, you do have a whole load of buddies and a big truck don't you?

Good Luck

Jamie

Jamie Hascall
12-08-2000, 07:25 PM
I'd try to get on the mailing lists of all the industrial auction companies for the region. Seeing that you're in Utah, there should be timber products companies still going belly up. As much as I hate to take advantage of peoples misfortune, it can be a great place to get a tool like a big band saw since nobody wants to transport the durn thing. The older and bigger it is, the cheaper it should be per lb. Uh, you do have a whole load of buddies and a big truck don't you?

Good Luck

Jamie

Charles Santi
12-08-2000, 07:44 PM
I agree why a 36" bandsaw we have a 20" SCMI vertical bandsaw which has always been big enough. We also have an older 14" AMT which gets the most use. We do have a Smith resaw that we do our resawing on it is a horizantal conveyor fed saw with a 35hp motor.

Charles Santi
12-08-2000, 07:44 PM
I agree why a 36" bandsaw we have a 20" SCMI vertical bandsaw which has always been big enough. We also have an older 14" AMT which gets the most use. We do have a Smith resaw that we do our resawing on it is a horizantal conveyor fed saw with a 35hp motor.

Charles Santi
12-08-2000, 07:44 PM
I agree why a 36" bandsaw we have a 20" SCMI vertical bandsaw which has always been big enough. We also have an older 14" AMT which gets the most use. We do have a Smith resaw that we do our resawing on it is a horizantal conveyor fed saw with a 35hp motor.

Kermit
12-10-2000, 09:27 PM
I bet you're looking to get a big bandsaw so you can rip to the center of a sheet of plywood, huh. That seems to be what many people see as the limitation of a small(er) bandsaw. If that's your situation, I'd encourage you to forget it. If you either have no table saw or don't want one for whatever reason, learn to rip with a "skil"saw. If you really need to cut plywood panels, the hands-down winner is a good panel saw, the kind that hold the panel in a near vertical position and have a saw that moves to do the cutting. Just don't go cheap if you do. The low-end panel saws I've seen are extremely sloppy and you won't be happy.

After many years of earning a living by milling lumber and plywood with a table saw, I'd encourage you to learn to use one safely. I know there are those who can't quite believe the stats that say the bandsaw is the most dangerous machine, but I'd agree. During my time the most frequent injuries I saw were at 14" Delta bandsaws just like we all either own or aspire to. I think an element of the relative hazard is the machine's small size and quiet nature. They seem no more dangerous than grandma's treadle sewing machine, but the little things are completely unfeeling and don't care if you feed them cedar or fingers. Too this day the machine that will make my skin crawl and feet want to retreat is a 36" ship's saw. I can get the terrors just thinking about one.

I still have all my fingers, and it is because that was my first priority each day I faced off against the shop's machines. I do have this one fingernail that grows sort of funny...

Kermit
12-10-2000, 09:27 PM
I bet you're looking to get a big bandsaw so you can rip to the center of a sheet of plywood, huh. That seems to be what many people see as the limitation of a small(er) bandsaw. If that's your situation, I'd encourage you to forget it. If you either have no table saw or don't want one for whatever reason, learn to rip with a "skil"saw. If you really need to cut plywood panels, the hands-down winner is a good panel saw, the kind that hold the panel in a near vertical position and have a saw that moves to do the cutting. Just don't go cheap if you do. The low-end panel saws I've seen are extremely sloppy and you won't be happy.

After many years of earning a living by milling lumber and plywood with a table saw, I'd encourage you to learn to use one safely. I know there are those who can't quite believe the stats that say the bandsaw is the most dangerous machine, but I'd agree. During my time the most frequent injuries I saw were at 14" Delta bandsaws just like we all either own or aspire to. I think an element of the relative hazard is the machine's small size and quiet nature. They seem no more dangerous than grandma's treadle sewing machine, but the little things are completely unfeeling and don't care if you feed them cedar or fingers. Too this day the machine that will make my skin crawl and feet want to retreat is a 36" ship's saw. I can get the terrors just thinking about one.

I still have all my fingers, and it is because that was my first priority each day I faced off against the shop's machines. I do have this one fingernail that grows sort of funny...

Kermit
12-10-2000, 09:27 PM
I bet you're looking to get a big bandsaw so you can rip to the center of a sheet of plywood, huh. That seems to be what many people see as the limitation of a small(er) bandsaw. If that's your situation, I'd encourage you to forget it. If you either have no table saw or don't want one for whatever reason, learn to rip with a "skil"saw. If you really need to cut plywood panels, the hands-down winner is a good panel saw, the kind that hold the panel in a near vertical position and have a saw that moves to do the cutting. Just don't go cheap if you do. The low-end panel saws I've seen are extremely sloppy and you won't be happy.

After many years of earning a living by milling lumber and plywood with a table saw, I'd encourage you to learn to use one safely. I know there are those who can't quite believe the stats that say the bandsaw is the most dangerous machine, but I'd agree. During my time the most frequent injuries I saw were at 14" Delta bandsaws just like we all either own or aspire to. I think an element of the relative hazard is the machine's small size and quiet nature. They seem no more dangerous than grandma's treadle sewing machine, but the little things are completely unfeeling and don't care if you feed them cedar or fingers. Too this day the machine that will make my skin crawl and feet want to retreat is a 36" ship's saw. I can get the terrors just thinking about one.

I still have all my fingers, and it is because that was my first priority each day I faced off against the shop's machines. I do have this one fingernail that grows sort of funny...

Ross Faneuf
12-12-2000, 01:21 PM
I actually owned an old shipyard 36" bandsaw some years ago. It had been used hard, and I had to replace the motor (which was a 1930's vintage 3-phase). It was actually useless to me. It's original use was sawing timber frames, and for that it would have been fine. It was not really accurate enough for the kind of work I was doing. To be fair, it might have been OK in good condition, but it had worn Babbit bearings I wasn't up to redoing, sloppy guides, etc etc. And boy did it eat up space; realize a 36" bandsaw is going to be 8' tall minimum, and more likely 9'. I'd leave it to the folks who really need one. Of course, if you're sawing out frames for a 120' traditional schooner...

Ross Faneuf
12-12-2000, 01:21 PM
I actually owned an old shipyard 36" bandsaw some years ago. It had been used hard, and I had to replace the motor (which was a 1930's vintage 3-phase). It was actually useless to me. It's original use was sawing timber frames, and for that it would have been fine. It was not really accurate enough for the kind of work I was doing. To be fair, it might have been OK in good condition, but it had worn Babbit bearings I wasn't up to redoing, sloppy guides, etc etc. And boy did it eat up space; realize a 36" bandsaw is going to be 8' tall minimum, and more likely 9'. I'd leave it to the folks who really need one. Of course, if you're sawing out frames for a 120' traditional schooner...

Ross Faneuf
12-12-2000, 01:21 PM
I actually owned an old shipyard 36" bandsaw some years ago. It had been used hard, and I had to replace the motor (which was a 1930's vintage 3-phase). It was actually useless to me. It's original use was sawing timber frames, and for that it would have been fine. It was not really accurate enough for the kind of work I was doing. To be fair, it might have been OK in good condition, but it had worn Babbit bearings I wasn't up to redoing, sloppy guides, etc etc. And boy did it eat up space; realize a 36" bandsaw is going to be 8' tall minimum, and more likely 9'. I'd leave it to the folks who really need one. Of course, if you're sawing out frames for a 120' traditional schooner...

Keith Wilson
12-12-2000, 02:07 PM
I suspect "good", "low cost" and "36-inch bandsaw" don't really fit in the same sentence. You want suppliers of used industrial machinery, I think. You could perhaps try these sites; they're mostly directories, but you might find something there: http://www.plantfloor.com/equipmt.htm
http://www.businessatweb.com/Business/Industries/Manufacturing/Machinery_and_Tools/Woodworking_Machinery/

And possibly http://woodweb.com/~woodweb/ii-mach.html

This is a trade magazine for the woodworking industry: http://www.iswonline.com/wwphdr.html

Keith Wilson
12-12-2000, 02:07 PM
I suspect "good", "low cost" and "36-inch bandsaw" don't really fit in the same sentence. You want suppliers of used industrial machinery, I think. You could perhaps try these sites; they're mostly directories, but you might find something there: http://www.plantfloor.com/equipmt.htm
http://www.businessatweb.com/Business/Industries/Manufacturing/Machinery_and_Tools/Woodworking_Machinery/

And possibly http://woodweb.com/~woodweb/ii-mach.html

This is a trade magazine for the woodworking industry: http://www.iswonline.com/wwphdr.html

Keith Wilson
12-12-2000, 02:07 PM
I suspect "good", "low cost" and "36-inch bandsaw" don't really fit in the same sentence. You want suppliers of used industrial machinery, I think. You could perhaps try these sites; they're mostly directories, but you might find something there: http://www.plantfloor.com/equipmt.htm
http://www.businessatweb.com/Business/Industries/Manufacturing/Machinery_and_Tools/Woodworking_Machinery/

And possibly http://woodweb.com/~woodweb/ii-mach.html

This is a trade magazine for the woodworking industry: http://www.iswonline.com/wwphdr.html