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bdouglas
10-10-2000, 08:29 PM
Need suggestions for sources for details on running rigging without winches for small sailing rigs?
I am re-rigging a 35' staysail schooner and need direction rummaging through the literature.

bdouglas
10-10-2000, 08:29 PM
Need suggestions for sources for details on running rigging without winches for small sailing rigs?
I am re-rigging a 35' staysail schooner and need direction rummaging through the literature.

bdouglas
10-10-2000, 08:29 PM
Need suggestions for sources for details on running rigging without winches for small sailing rigs?
I am re-rigging a 35' staysail schooner and need direction rummaging through the literature.

Thad
10-11-2000, 06:11 AM
Depending on the rig you mean to produce I might say John Leather's GAFF RIG book or LF Herreshoff's SENSIBLE CRUISING DESIGNS. Other books like these and every sail plan you could look at would have some variations to offer. The thing to look for is sail plans with similar sail area as what you need is the mechanical advantage to control the sails under the pressure of the wind.

Thad
10-11-2000, 06:11 AM
Depending on the rig you mean to produce I might say John Leather's GAFF RIG book or LF Herreshoff's SENSIBLE CRUISING DESIGNS. Other books like these and every sail plan you could look at would have some variations to offer. The thing to look for is sail plans with similar sail area as what you need is the mechanical advantage to control the sails under the pressure of the wind.

Thad
10-11-2000, 06:11 AM
Depending on the rig you mean to produce I might say John Leather's GAFF RIG book or LF Herreshoff's SENSIBLE CRUISING DESIGNS. Other books like these and every sail plan you could look at would have some variations to offer. The thing to look for is sail plans with similar sail area as what you need is the mechanical advantage to control the sails under the pressure of the wind.

Ed Harrow
10-11-2000, 11:36 AM
This may help. Consolation was 40' yawl, had double sheave block at main throat, two singles on the peak, a double on her main sheet,a single on her staysail sheet, and a pull your guts out direct for the jib.

Ed Harrow
10-11-2000, 11:36 AM
This may help. Consolation was 40' yawl, had double sheave block at main throat, two singles on the peak, a double on her main sheet,a single on her staysail sheet, and a pull your guts out direct for the jib.

Ed Harrow
10-11-2000, 11:36 AM
This may help. Consolation was 40' yawl, had double sheave block at main throat, two singles on the peak, a double on her main sheet,a single on her staysail sheet, and a pull your guts out direct for the jib.

Keith Wilson
10-11-2000, 11:50 AM
Roger Taylor's little book "Knowing the Ropes" has a fair number of good ideas about this sort of thing. It's not just another knot book, far from it. In fact, now that I think of it, I've gotten more good ideas per page from this book than anything else on the subject I've ever seen.

Brion Toss's "Rigger's Apprentice" is a really good general reference, but not as good on specific rigging details.

Keith Wilson
10-11-2000, 11:50 AM
Roger Taylor's little book "Knowing the Ropes" has a fair number of good ideas about this sort of thing. It's not just another knot book, far from it. In fact, now that I think of it, I've gotten more good ideas per page from this book than anything else on the subject I've ever seen.

Brion Toss's "Rigger's Apprentice" is a really good general reference, but not as good on specific rigging details.

Keith Wilson
10-11-2000, 11:50 AM
Roger Taylor's little book "Knowing the Ropes" has a fair number of good ideas about this sort of thing. It's not just another knot book, far from it. In fact, now that I think of it, I've gotten more good ideas per page from this book than anything else on the subject I've ever seen.

Brion Toss's "Rigger's Apprentice" is a really good general reference, but not as good on specific rigging details.

Ian McColgin
10-11-2000, 01:31 PM
Having endured Goblin as she was rerigged to a staysail schooner from the original gaff fore, macaroni main, I'd suggest you go back to gaff fore if you can afford it. Under lower rig, the mainstaysail is a bit small for normal working, but a nice big fisherman adds a lot of work and is a real pain to set well off the wind. These little 12 tonners are really too small to make good use of the staysail rig.

It's not normal in older rigs, but if you can make a sliding gooseneck, then all the tackle you need for luff tensioning can be on the downhaul and save a lot of rope. Failing that, bring the fall down to a deck hook and back up to a pin or mast cleat to make it really easy to sweat some real stress into the luff.

I've been able to set up jibs in this size by attaching the tack to a 5 part purchase rigged to disadvantage and leading back to the pinrail. Just run it up snug and then haul away on the downhaul. Again, saves huge line and gives more power than any practical way to add purchase to the hallyard.

A boomed jib or forestaysail won't need sheet winches but a really big fisherman or jib is more commonly handled by sheet winches. Same with the main running backs which right now stiffen up both the mainstaysail stay. Any of these can be set up tightly enough by a handy crew snugging it home at the right instant, but could be beyond practical tightening if you're just hardening up and don't want to luff her. I agree with your sentiments, but I'd keep the sheet winches unless you have just one clubbed jib and lots of power on the running backstay tackles.

That's figuring that you'll only use a big fisherman on light days when you're well crewed anyway.

You'll love the schooner's power off the wind. One Reverse Hurricane Cup (just a scoot across the Sound from Nantucket to Hyannis) provided Goblin's finest moment. Since I was singlehanding I started under conservative canvass of reefed main and no fisherman. Once away I shook the reef and got the psychosail up. It was a nice just abaft the beam reach with good wind in a dense fog. Goblin tracked perfectly, being more used to allowing for the currents than many of the tupperwareweekendwarriors, and the log stayed pegged at it's max of 8. Clearly we were going faster than that since NB to HH was 1h57m&something. We'd overtake all these plump IOR freaks struggling to handle their spinnakers, myself at my ease with a pipe and a glass of the best . . .

Days like that make up for her propensity for 110degree tacks, at their best, more like 60 degrees off the wind when leeway was factored.

G'luck

[This message has been edited by Ian McColgin (edited 10-11-2000).]

Ian McColgin
10-11-2000, 01:31 PM
Having endured Goblin as she was rerigged to a staysail schooner from the original gaff fore, macaroni main, I'd suggest you go back to gaff fore if you can afford it. Under lower rig, the mainstaysail is a bit small for normal working, but a nice big fisherman adds a lot of work and is a real pain to set well off the wind. These little 12 tonners are really too small to make good use of the staysail rig.

It's not normal in older rigs, but if you can make a sliding gooseneck, then all the tackle you need for luff tensioning can be on the downhaul and save a lot of rope. Failing that, bring the fall down to a deck hook and back up to a pin or mast cleat to make it really easy to sweat some real stress into the luff.

I've been able to set up jibs in this size by attaching the tack to a 5 part purchase rigged to disadvantage and leading back to the pinrail. Just run it up snug and then haul away on the downhaul. Again, saves huge line and gives more power than any practical way to add purchase to the hallyard.

A boomed jib or forestaysail won't need sheet winches but a really big fisherman or jib is more commonly handled by sheet winches. Same with the main running backs which right now stiffen up both the mainstaysail stay. Any of these can be set up tightly enough by a handy crew snugging it home at the right instant, but could be beyond practical tightening if you're just hardening up and don't want to luff her. I agree with your sentiments, but I'd keep the sheet winches unless you have just one clubbed jib and lots of power on the running backstay tackles.

That's figuring that you'll only use a big fisherman on light days when you're well crewed anyway.

You'll love the schooner's power off the wind. One Reverse Hurricane Cup (just a scoot across the Sound from Nantucket to Hyannis) provided Goblin's finest moment. Since I was singlehanding I started under conservative canvass of reefed main and no fisherman. Once away I shook the reef and got the psychosail up. It was a nice just abaft the beam reach with good wind in a dense fog. Goblin tracked perfectly, being more used to allowing for the currents than many of the tupperwareweekendwarriors, and the log stayed pegged at it's max of 8. Clearly we were going faster than that since NB to HH was 1h57m&something. We'd overtake all these plump IOR freaks struggling to handle their spinnakers, myself at my ease with a pipe and a glass of the best . . .

Days like that make up for her propensity for 110degree tacks, at their best, more like 60 degrees off the wind when leeway was factored.

G'luck

[This message has been edited by Ian McColgin (edited 10-11-2000).]

Ian McColgin
10-11-2000, 01:31 PM
Having endured Goblin as she was rerigged to a staysail schooner from the original gaff fore, macaroni main, I'd suggest you go back to gaff fore if you can afford it. Under lower rig, the mainstaysail is a bit small for normal working, but a nice big fisherman adds a lot of work and is a real pain to set well off the wind. These little 12 tonners are really too small to make good use of the staysail rig.

It's not normal in older rigs, but if you can make a sliding gooseneck, then all the tackle you need for luff tensioning can be on the downhaul and save a lot of rope. Failing that, bring the fall down to a deck hook and back up to a pin or mast cleat to make it really easy to sweat some real stress into the luff.

I've been able to set up jibs in this size by attaching the tack to a 5 part purchase rigged to disadvantage and leading back to the pinrail. Just run it up snug and then haul away on the downhaul. Again, saves huge line and gives more power than any practical way to add purchase to the hallyard.

A boomed jib or forestaysail won't need sheet winches but a really big fisherman or jib is more commonly handled by sheet winches. Same with the main running backs which right now stiffen up both the mainstaysail stay. Any of these can be set up tightly enough by a handy crew snugging it home at the right instant, but could be beyond practical tightening if you're just hardening up and don't want to luff her. I agree with your sentiments, but I'd keep the sheet winches unless you have just one clubbed jib and lots of power on the running backstay tackles.

That's figuring that you'll only use a big fisherman on light days when you're well crewed anyway.

You'll love the schooner's power off the wind. One Reverse Hurricane Cup (just a scoot across the Sound from Nantucket to Hyannis) provided Goblin's finest moment. Since I was singlehanding I started under conservative canvass of reefed main and no fisherman. Once away I shook the reef and got the psychosail up. It was a nice just abaft the beam reach with good wind in a dense fog. Goblin tracked perfectly, being more used to allowing for the currents than many of the tupperwareweekendwarriors, and the log stayed pegged at it's max of 8. Clearly we were going faster than that since NB to HH was 1h57m&something. We'd overtake all these plump IOR freaks struggling to handle their spinnakers, myself at my ease with a pipe and a glass of the best . . .

Days like that make up for her propensity for 110degree tacks, at their best, more like 60 degrees off the wind when leeway was factored.

G'luck

[This message has been edited by Ian McColgin (edited 10-11-2000).]