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sailcanoefan
08-13-2014, 03:17 PM
I'm building a 19 ft sailboat since 2012. It's a model designed by Mr Bruce Crandall, in 1940. Of course I'm using modern materials like, epoxy and fiberglass to protect wood and waterproof the hull. My currently thread is: 19 ft cruising sailboat, DN Goodchild.

This boat model was already built by another WBF member, Mr Donald Branscom, a gentleman who helped me many time in the beginning when I started building my dream boat. See photo bellow.

Although nothing in the plan is mentioned concerning bildge ballast , is it necessary to ballast or not this boat?

Boat plan include a centerboard trunk in which a 75 pound steel plate is installed.
Boat dimensions: 19 ft long, 6 ft wide at waterline.

You, as boat builder, did you ballast bildge?

Thanks for tips and hints, all input welcome.

I Colorized this old photo from 1941
http://i1045.photobucket.com/albums/b458/Sailcanoefan/19%20ft%20cruising%20sailboat/Monvoilier1.jpg

Centerboard trunk - Inside a 75 pound stell plate swivel up and down.
http://i1045.photobucket.com/albums/b458/Sailcanoefan/19%20ft%20cruising%20sailboat/19%20ft%20Cruising%20Sailboat%202014%20Part%201/IMGP3883480x360.jpg

Ian McColgin
08-13-2014, 03:25 PM
I'd not ballast this boat. I'm not sure that the metal board will help ultimate stability all that much and ultimate stability does not matter in a boat that will flood if the cockpit combing goes under so treat her like the centerboarder she is an enjoy some small boat adventure. This is a super boat to take up a small tickle for the night and she won't mind taking the mud when the tide drops out.

G'luck

Binnacle Bat
08-13-2014, 03:36 PM
I agree with Ian.

Keep your anchor down low, and store the beer under the floor boards, & otherwise stay light.

Be ready to reef when it pipes up.

How many square feet of sail on the plans?

Allan

JimD
08-13-2014, 03:44 PM
Easy enough to add some at any time.

Thorne
08-13-2014, 03:54 PM
You need to trust the designer on this and many other issues - otherwise don't build this particular craft. Your ply and epoxy will probably be a bit lighter than the original, but many new builders (myself included) tend to overbuild and end up with heavier-than-usual boats, so it may even out. As Jim says, you can easily add ballast at any time.

I've seen Donald's boat and you've picked a good one -- enjoy and take lots of pics!

wizbang 13
08-13-2014, 03:57 PM
Don't go cementing stuff in from the get go , that is for sure !
sail her .
I like to carry a few sandbags even in my smallest boats .

sailcanoefan
08-13-2014, 04:11 PM
Thanks Ian, Binnacle Bat, Jim, Wizbang and Thorne for quick answer!!!

I will certainly take many pics and videos when sailing.
I'm taking much pictures while building the boat, and I'm also writing an illustrated a daily journal as souvenir.

I can now finish the boat in peace!!!

If needed I will add ballast, low on bildge floor.

sailcanoefan
08-13-2014, 04:40 PM
Message to friends:

I have very good experience sailing my trimaran sailing canoe.
The Golden Rule in canoe sailing is, No more than wind force F5
as mentioned by the OCSG, Open Canoe Sailing Group, England.

I was sailing this outfit for 5 years in many conditions, very loaded with camping gears, food, beer and name it.
Everytime it was always a happy event, because I have respected the GOLDEN RULE.

Now my intention is to keep this GOLDEN RULE with this 19 ft Sailboat. Get good esperience and later if OK, I will sail a trial with F6 wind force.

One step at the Time.

http://i1045.photobucket.com/albums/b458/Sailcanoefan/Baskatong%20canoe%20sailing/e8c29d52-9483-4ec6-a0d9-57ccfa905db5.jpg?t=1407965860

sailcanoefan
08-13-2014, 04:49 PM
How many square feet of sail on the plans?

Allan

Designer specifications are 2 rigs:

1- Jib: 59 sf. Main: 128 sf. Total: 187 sf.

2- Jib: 48 sf. Main: 104 sf. Total: 152 sf.

My rig will be slightly more than No. 2, around 160 sf.

Landlockedvoyager
08-15-2014, 02:06 AM
I remember seeing that photo at the D N Goodchild website. It's a lovely design and should make for pleasant sailing and weekending. I agree with the advice already given. A little moveable internal ballast is ok if you find she needs some trimming, but other than that I would leave it alone. The designer left her unbalasted for a reason. There is a reason why some people get paid to design boats and the rest of us do not. Good luck with finishing your boat. That design is a beauty. - John

Landlockedvoyager
08-15-2014, 02:12 AM
I should also add that it is an accomplishment to build even a small cruising boat from those little sheets. I would not have attempted it. My compliments, Sir. - John

RFNK
08-15-2014, 04:58 AM
It's a very light hull. Run her aground with internal ballast and you'll wreck the boat. I certainly wouldn't put any internal ballast in a boat like this. As mentioned above, just the normal gear you'll carry will add a fair bit of stability. Use sail selection and reefing to ensure you stay balanced and, as also mentioned above, trust the designer.

Rick

sailcanoefan
08-15-2014, 08:09 AM
I should also add that it is an accomplishment to build even a small cruising boat from those little sheets. I would not have attempted it. My compliments, Sir. - John

Wow, thanks for these nice words.

It's my first built. No experience in boat building, although some experience in other field like; home maintenance, electronics, some knowledge working with lathe and milling machine.

Yes, little sheets we're by moments a real pest. The worst part however was the biggining:

Frames are not so bad in tracing full size on paper, but STEM and Rudder...WOW. from 1/8 inch square on plan to full size 2 inches squares was a challenge (3 inches for rudder).

Now it's easy because most work is done.

If I had to come back and chose a plan, I would definitly go for a full size plan.

sailcanoefan
08-15-2014, 08:23 AM
You need to trust the designer on this and many other issues - otherwise don't build this particular craft. Your ply and epoxy will probably be a bit lighter than the original, but many new builders (myself included) tend to overbuild and end up with heavier-than-usual boats, so it may even out. As Jim says, you can easily add ballast at any time.

I've seen Donald's boat and you've picked a good one -- enjoy and take lots of pics!

Thanks Thorne. I will trust Mr. Bruce Crandall, the designer. The plan says 600 pounds from plywood build, and 700 pounds from planking.

Using epoxy and fiberglass will add some weight (7 gallons epoxy and 25 yards fiberblass 6 oz cloth).

I will make a sliding hatch later, next year.

Réal