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Paul Pless
08-07-2014, 10:27 AM
are foiling multihulls gonna get?

http://www.giftmansion.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/foiling-flying-on-water-with-team-usa-oracle-72-foot-sailboat-1024x576.jpg

Figment
08-07-2014, 10:31 AM
I'm waiting for the next phase in which they shed extraneous hull segments once they are afoil.

Paul Pless
08-07-2014, 10:32 AM
:d . . .

David G
08-07-2014, 10:41 AM
Baaahhh

Phillip Allen
08-07-2014, 10:43 AM
gimcracks and gee gaws... for the easily entertained

Tom Wilkinson
08-07-2014, 11:06 AM
gimcracks and gee gaws... for the easily entertained

Could as easily be said about one of your favorite pastimes.

The engineering behind these boats is incredible.

Osborne Russell
08-07-2014, 11:29 AM
Could as easily be said about one of your favorite pastimes.

The engineering behind these boats is incredible.

Is that a saxophone you're holding in your picture?

I appreciate the engineering aspect, and the conspicuous consumption criticism too.

I look at it as art. Formerly, engineering and art weren't separate. Check out the book, The Pope's Ceiling I think it is, about Michelangelo doing the fresco on the Sistine Chapel. M says, how'm I supposed to get six tons of plaster onto a ceiling and paint it before it dries? Pope says, that's your problem, flat rate job. Want the contract or not?

I say, the quality of the art is the measure of the worthiness of the endeavor.

Paul Pless
08-07-2014, 11:37 AM
Is that a saxophone you're holding in your picture?damn, all this time i thought it was a hookah. . .

Jim Mahan
08-07-2014, 11:39 AM
There's always the possibility of some serendipitous advance or understanding being furthered. Suppose someday what we decide we need is a realistic alternative to either doing without international commerce or doing it without being based on fossil fuel.

How about fifty mile an hour, four hundred foot long, multi-decked, multi-hulled container ships with half a dozen, five hundred foot tall masts and marconi rigged with banks of solar cells?

Tom Wilkinson
08-07-2014, 11:50 AM
Is that a saxophone you're holding in your picture?



Yep. I started playing again a few years ago after quitting for 25 years. Really enjoy it and play in a few community bands both in GA and NH. NH's arts funding is far better though.

Phillip Allen
08-07-2014, 11:51 AM
Could as easily be said about one of your favorite pastimes.

The engineering behind these boats is incredible.

I like boats not jokes... I do much the sames with my hobby

Canoez
08-07-2014, 12:00 PM
At what point do they cease to be boats and become airplanes?

John of Phoenix
08-07-2014, 12:03 PM
how much more badass
are foiling multihulls gonna get?


I don't know but I'm really looking forward to the next America's Cup series.

JimD
08-07-2014, 12:04 PM
At what point do they cease to be boats and become airplanes?

Eventually the foils will be retractable.

Hwyl
08-07-2014, 12:58 PM
At what point do they cease to be boats and become airplanes?

http://owlshead.org/assets/122/demenjoz__medium.jpeg


http://declanfleming.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/dynamic-equilibrium-escalator-model.jpg

Tom Wilkinson
08-07-2014, 01:02 PM
I like boats not jokes... I do much the sames with my hobby

Just because you don't like it doesn't make it a joke. seems an awful lot of people that were die hard against these boats changed their mind after the actual event. The engineering behind them is no joke. Sad you can't see that.

New tech is often treated that way.

Tom Wilkinson
08-07-2014, 02:22 PM
I don't know but I'm really looking forward to the next America's Cup series.

I am too. The last series was great to watch.

Paul Pless
08-07-2014, 02:30 PM
I don't know but I'm really looking forward to the next America's Cup series.


I am too. The last series was great to watch.


in the mean time, we get these sleds to tide us over

http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnn/dam/assets/130514143653-volvo-ocean-race-horizontal-gallery.jpg

http://37.media.tumblr.com/1e6592dec339afc75c1e5ed5ca044877/tumblr_mhmjrmk1h61s2zccxo1_1280.jpg

http://news.volvogroup.com/wp-content/themes/tidningskompaniet/image.php?src=http://news.volvogroup.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/VOR_584x367.jpg&h=367&w=584&zc=1

http://www.sportshdwallpapers.com/download/volvo-ocean-race-2012-telefonica_1920x1200_507-wide.jpg

BrianY
08-07-2014, 02:53 PM
Well, if marketed properly boats like that will attract a wider audience...the NASCAR folks for example...because the crashes are gonna be spectacular. Nothing like speed combined with the constant threat of death and the destruction of millions of dollars worth of technology to grab a crowd's attention.

Phillip Allen
08-07-2014, 03:22 PM
Just because you don't like it doesn't make it a joke. seems an awful lot of people that were die hard against these boats changed their mind after the actual event. The engineering behind them is no joke. Sad you can't see that.

New tech is often treated that way.

Oh, but I CAN see it... you don't get my point at all

Osborne Russell
08-07-2014, 03:27 PM
That's what I like about giant wave surfing -- less death & destruction. Less technology, too. Less hubris?

Osborne Russell
08-07-2014, 03:27 PM
Those pictures are badass, you must admit.

Captain Intrepid
08-07-2014, 03:29 PM
I like boats not jokes... I do much the sames with my hobby

Now this, this is a real man's boat!

http://i59.tinypic.com/w8nr78.png

Tom Wilkinson
08-07-2014, 03:35 PM
Oh, but I CAN see it... you don't get my point at all

No, you see what YOU want to see. That's fine, but it doesnt make the boats junk.

If you have a point other than that, make it. History says you won't.

Phillip Allen
08-07-2014, 03:37 PM
No, you see what YOU want to see. That's fine, but it doesnt make the boats junk.

If you have a point other than that, make it. History says you won't.

I didn't say the boats were junk. that's your projection

Tom Wilkinson
08-07-2014, 04:02 PM
I didn't say the boats were junk. that's your projection

Sorry, meant to say you think they are a joke, and that is what you said. No projection. I didn't go back and reread your comment. The distinction isn't worth noting but continue your semantics games.

As usual, you aren't making your point.

TomF
08-07-2014, 04:05 PM
I'm waiting for the next phase in which they shed extraneous hull segments once they are afoil.That would be awesome. :D

Phillip Allen
08-07-2014, 04:51 PM
Sorry, meant to say you think they are a joke, and that is what you said. No projection. I didn't go back and reread your comment. The distinction isn't worth noting but continue your semantics games.

As usual, you aren't making your point.

I know I haven't tried to make a point beyond what I've already said... I want to see who can understand it without being spoon-fed

Paul Pless
08-07-2014, 04:57 PM
christ. . .

JayInOz
08-07-2014, 05:15 PM
christ. . .
Yes? JayInOz

Bobcat
08-07-2014, 05:31 PM
I think it's great that sailing is advancing in terms of speed through imagination and engineering.

Tom Wilkinson
08-07-2014, 06:33 PM
I think it's great that sailing is advancing in terms of speed through imagination and engineering.
Exactly. For the life of me I don't understand why some see these boats as a joke when it's really cutting edge technology. Is it the stuff of the very wealthy, sure. It always has been.

Waddie
08-07-2014, 06:51 PM
How about an America's Cup boat with no crew? They're doing it with container ships now. How's that for your technology?

regards,
Waddie

Bobcat
08-07-2014, 07:13 PM
Exactly. For the life of me I don't understand why some see these boats as a joke when it's really cutting edge technology. Is it the stuff of the very wealthy, sure. It always has been.

And these boats have a wide audience. Top Gear the BBC motoring show featured Oracle in a race against a car. It was something seeing a boat running at 25+ knots over the open ocean. And something to see how wet and miserable you get sailing one....

Tom Wilkinson
08-07-2014, 07:46 PM
How about an America's Cup boat with no crew? They're doing it with container ships now. How's that for your technology?

regards,
Waddie
These boats still require huge amounts of manual labor, skill, and strategy to sail. Could they be completely computer controlled, probably so, but that is a whole different issue. The engineering tha allows a 70ft boat to rise completely out of the water and be supported by something roughly the size of surfboard is pretty remarkable.

Guess I'm still missing the "joke".

Phillip Allen
08-07-2014, 07:59 PM
These boats still require huge amounts of manual labor, skill, and strategy to sail. Could they be completely computer controlled, probably so, but that is a whole different issue. The engineering tha allows a 70ft boat to rise completely out of the water and be supported by something roughly the size of surfboard is pretty remarkable.

Guess I'm still missing the "joke".

the technology is antiquated (speaking of sail powered boats)... boats that are ‘with the times’ are motor powered... a sail boat with super advanced technology is a contradiction made manifest.. Not any different than figuring out how to use smokeless powder in a muzzle loading firearm or a NASCAR racer not capable of carrying a cargo of moon shine or two tin cans with super high tech kite string between them (kids telephone). If you want to have a sailing race… do it with real sail boats and do it with boats which can conceivably owned and operated by one person… that is, the owner and the skipper are the same person. The first sail boat in the first ‘America’s cup race was taken to the race after crossing an ocean by the skipper… we’ve lost sight of that by the fans of impossibly high priced gee gaws.

John Smith
08-07-2014, 08:27 PM
I found myself fascinated by the capabilities of these craft. Yes, they stretch the definition of "boat" as we know it. I like to think of them as sailing machines.

Paul Pless
08-07-2014, 08:30 PM
the technology is antiquated (speaking of sail powered boats)... boats that are ‘with the times’ are motor powered... a sail boat with super advanced technology is a contradiction made manifest.. Not any different than figuring out how to use smokeless powder in a muzzle loading firearm or a NASCAR racer not capable of carrying a cargo of moon shine or two tin cans with super high tech kite string between them (kids telephone). If you want to have a sailing race… do it with real sail boats and do it with boats which can conceivably owned and operated by one person… that is, the owner and the skipper are the same person. The first sail boat in the first ‘America’s cup race was taken to the race after crossing an ocean by the skipper… we’ve lost sight of that by the fans of impossibly high priced gee gaws.that's why there's about a gazillion different racing sailboat classes. . .

fwiw, I enjoy a wide variety of sailing yachts just as I do a wide variety of racing cars and bikes; I've never understood why a fan of one type feels the need to look down on a fan of another type

Tom Wilkinson
08-07-2014, 09:26 PM
the technology is antiquated (speaking of sail powered boats)... boats that are ‘with the times’ are motor powered... a sail boat with super advanced technology is a contradiction made manifest.. Not any different than figuring out how to use smokeless powder in a muzzle loading firearm or a NASCAR racer not capable of carrying a cargo of moon shine or two tin cans with super high tech kite string between them (kids telephone). If you want to have a sailing race… do it with real sail boats and do it with boats which can conceivably owned and operated by one person… that is, the owner and the skipper are the same person. The first sail boat in the first ‘America’s cup race was taken to the race after crossing an ocean by the skipper… we’ve lost sight of that by the fans of impossibly high priced gee gaws.

The technology is far from antiquated, and the America's up has nearly always been a rich folks sport. You'd be hard pressed to find any owner/skippers in America's cup racing. Even in early races they were running 65-90 ft yachts.

You don't like the new boats. Fine, but the racing is far from a joke and the technology is anything but antiquated.

Boats that are "with the times" are motor powered????? Um, no

Captain Intrepid
08-07-2014, 11:34 PM
the technology is antiquated (speaking of sail powered boats)... boats that are ‘with the times’ are motor powered... a sail boat with super advanced technology is a contradiction made manifest.. Not any different than figuring out how to use smokeless powder in a muzzle loading firearm or a NASCAR racer not capable of carrying a cargo of moon shine or two tin cans with super high tech kite string between them (kids telephone). If you want to have a sailing race… do it with real sail boats and do it with boats which can conceivably owned and operated by one person… that is, the owner and the skipper are the same person. The first sail boat in the first ‘America’s cup race was taken to the race after crossing an ocean by the skipper… we’ve lost sight of that by the fans of impossibly high priced gee gaws.

Even in the 1800s, the America's cup was raced by unseaworthy disposable high tech boats commissioned by the obscenely wealthy.

Nothing has changed.

Harvey Golden
08-07-2014, 11:55 PM
are foiling multihulls gonna get?

http://www.giftmansion.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/foiling-flying-on-water-with-team-usa-oracle-72-foot-sailboat-1024x576.jpg

Honestly, when does navigation become aviation? I think its a fine line, perhaps one known as the "waterline." We've all heard of flying boats; are there now boating aircraft?

pipefitter
08-08-2014, 12:10 AM
I get the art, but it has somehow become predictable. Same with when they broke 300mph with top fuel dragsters. Now if this was new, and the concept never approached or used, and if it wasn't for a computer telling them it could be done and how, then I might be impressed.

Now, what the Wright Brothers did (and the others, I know) was spectacular. So what would my reaction have been back then, as compared to now?

Technology, has gotten to the point where it is beginning to consume itself, if that makes any sense. I remember being impressed by guys getting 400+ hp out of small blocks with off the shelf parts in their garage. Just about everything you see these days, beyond perhaps, the initial concept, has CAD, or CNC attached to it somehow.

Not dissing the OP. I can see where some would like that and it's all good.

skuthorp
08-08-2014, 05:21 AM
Hmmm. Remove the boat, attach the foil to the base of the mast……… smaller sail probably…………… smaller crew………...
http://yachtyakka.co.nz/wp/wp-content/uploads/2009/05/foiler.jpg

Getting there.

PeterSibley
08-08-2014, 05:43 AM
are foiling multihulls gonna get?

http://www.giftmansion.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/foiling-flying-on-water-with-team-usa-oracle-72-foot-sailboat-1024x576.jpg


Fantastic ! As someone said , I'm looking forward to foiling 800 foot long sailing container ships doing 50mph .

Garth Jones
08-08-2014, 08:16 AM
The first America's Cup winner was the schooner America. She was built in 1851 by a syndicate of six wealthy men from the New York Yacht Club. She was a 101 foot long schooner built specifically for prestige racing and sailed to Britain for such races. Not exactly the sort of boat that can be sailed by the owner/captain on his/her own. Anyway, FYI....

Brian Palmer
08-08-2014, 08:38 AM
the technology is antiquated (speaking of sail powered boats)... boats that are ‘with the times’ are motor powered... a sail boat with super advanced technology is a contradiction made manifest.. Not any different than figuring out how to use smokeless powder in a muzzle loading firearm or a NASCAR racer not capable of carrying a cargo of moon shine or two tin cans with super high tech kite string between them (kids telephone). If you want to have a sailing race… do it with real sail boats and do it with boats which can conceivably owned and operated by one person… that is, the owner and the skipper are the same person. The first sail boat in the first ‘America’s cup race was taken to the race after crossing an ocean by the skipper… we’ve lost sight of that by the fans of impossibly high priced gee gaws.

A sail-powered boat is currently the record-holder by 15 days over the next fastest powerboat (either the nuclear-powered sub USS Triton or the wave-piercing Earthrace) for a circumnavigation (from Wikipedia):
Fastest nautical circumnavigations of the globe(Ordered by ascending date of completion of voyage)


Operation Sandblast (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Sandblast); 1960; USS Triton (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Triton_(SSRN-586)); first underwater (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timeline_of_underwater_technology) circumnavigation, and fastest mechanically powered circumnavigation (disputed with Earthrace (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earthrace), 2008), in 60 days 21 minutes.
Jon Sanders (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jon_Sanders); 1986–1988; holds the world record for completing a single-handed, non-stop, triple circumnavigation, in 658 days 21 hours and 18 minutes.
Jean Luc Van Den Heede (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean_Luc_Van_Den_Heede) (French); 2004; fastest westward single-handed (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Single-handed_sailing) circumnavigation, 122 days 14 hours 3 minutes 49 seconds.
Adrienne Cahalan (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adrienne_Cahalan) (Australian); February–March 2004; fastest woman to complete a circumnavigation (crew of "Cheyenne") 58 days 9 hours 32 minutes 45 seconds.
Earthrace (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earthrace); 2008; wave-piercing trimaran, with two 540 horsepower multi-fuelled engines; current world record holder for a motorized vessel (disputed with USS Triton (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Triton), 1960), in 60 days 23 hours and 49 minutes.
Francis Joyon (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Francis_Joyon) (French); Nov 2007–Jan 2008; current fastest single-handed (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Single-handed_sailing) circumnavigation, in 57 days, 13 hours, 34 minutes, 6 seconds.
Franck Cammas (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Franck_Cammas) and a crew of 10; 20 March 2010; French sail-powered trimaran Groupama 3 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Groupama_3); previous absolute (wind or mechanically powered) fastest maritime circumnavigation, in a time of 48 days, 7 hours 44 minutes and 52 seconds.
Loïck Peyron (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lo%C3%AFck_Peyron) and crew of fourteen sailors; Nov 2011–Jan 2012; the Maxi trimaran Banque Populaire V (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Banque_Populaire_V); current absolute (wind or mechanically powered) fastest maritime circumnavigation,in 45 days 13 hours 42 minutes 53 seconds of sailing. Average speed of 26.51 knots (30.51 MPH), covering a total distance of 29 002 miles.


There have been no solo non-stop motorized circumnavigations.

Tom Wilkinson
08-08-2014, 08:46 AM
let's not let facts get in the way now...

purri
08-08-2014, 09:01 PM
I saw Banque Populaire at La Ciotat in 2013. Most impressive.

Phillip Allen
08-08-2014, 09:52 PM
A sail-powered boat is currently the record-holder by 15 days over the next fastest powerboat (either the nuclear-powered sub USS Triton or the wave-piercing Earthrace) for a circumnavigation (from Wikipedia):
Fastest nautical circumnavigations of the globe(Ordered by ascending date of completion of voyage)


Operation Sandblast (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Sandblast); 1960; USS Triton (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Triton_(SSRN-586)); first underwater (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timeline_of_underwater_technology) circumnavigation, and fastest mechanically powered circumnavigation (disputed with Earthrace (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earthrace), 2008), in 60 days 21 minutes.
Jon Sanders (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jon_Sanders); 1986–1988; holds the world record for completing a single-handed, non-stop, triple circumnavigation, in 658 days 21 hours and 18 minutes.
Jean Luc Van Den Heede (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean_Luc_Van_Den_Heede) (French); 2004; fastest westward single-handed (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Single-handed_sailing) circumnavigation, 122 days 14 hours 3 minutes 49 seconds.
Adrienne Cahalan (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adrienne_Cahalan) (Australian); February–March 2004; fastest woman to complete a circumnavigation (crew of "Cheyenne") 58 days 9 hours 32 minutes 45 seconds.
Earthrace (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earthrace); 2008; wave-piercing trimaran, with two 540 horsepower multi-fuelled engines; current world record holder for a motorized vessel (disputed with USS Triton (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Triton), 1960), in 60 days 23 hours and 49 minutes.
Francis Joyon (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Francis_Joyon) (French); Nov 2007–Jan 2008; current fastest single-handed (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Single-handed_sailing) circumnavigation, in 57 days, 13 hours, 34 minutes, 6 seconds.
Franck Cammas (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Franck_Cammas) and a crew of 10; 20 March 2010; French sail-powered trimaran Groupama 3 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Groupama_3); previous absolute (wind or mechanically powered) fastest maritime circumnavigation, in a time of 48 days, 7 hours 44 minutes and 52 seconds.
Loïck Peyron (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lo%C3%AFck_Peyron) and crew of fourteen sailors; Nov 2011–Jan 2012; the Maxi trimaran Banque Populaire V (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Banque_Populaire_V); current absolute (wind or mechanically powered) fastest maritime circumnavigation,in 45 days 13 hours 42 minutes 53 seconds of sailing. Average speed of 26.51 knots (30.51 MPH), covering a total distance of 29 002 miles.


There have been no solo non-stop motorized circumnavigations.

doesn't change anything... my point is that sail is antiquated and motor is not... technology extremes in sail is self contradictory... I shoot black powder... I can load a conventional rifle from the muzzle if I want but to do so defeats the spirit of the sport

I like sail boats but I want my sailboats to look like sailboats and not like something Jackson Pollok would have dreamed up.

John of Phoenix
08-08-2014, 10:09 PM
Too stupid to know they're stupid.

Old Dryfoot
08-09-2014, 12:19 AM
badass in pink

http://1yb5dx32zr9j19lz6w18wrwje0m.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/vo65.jpg

Paul Pless
08-09-2014, 05:54 AM
doesn't change anything... my point is that sail is antiquated and motor is not... technology extremes in sail is self contradictory... I shoot black powder... I can load a conventional rifle from the muzzle if I want but to do so defeats the spirit of the sport

I like sail boats but I want my sailboats to look like sailboats and not like something Jackson Pollok would have dreamed up.

your point? your opinion??

its sounds like you want sailboats to be antiquated, is it a bit of a projection?

Hwyl
08-09-2014, 06:26 AM
your point? or your opinion??

its sounds like you want sailboats to be antiquated, is it a bit of a projection?

His point is clear "everything in life shall be compared to muzzle loaders and meatloaf".

Paul Pless
08-09-2014, 06:29 AM
paradise by the dashboard lets, eh?

Tom Wilkinson
08-09-2014, 07:40 AM
doesn't change anything... my point is that sail is antiquated and motor is not... technology extremes in sail is self contradictory... I shoot black powder... I can load a conventional rifle from the muzzle if I want but to do so defeats the spirit of the sport

I like sail boats but I want my sailboats to look like sailboats and not like something Jackson Pollok would have dreamed up.
I guess if you want to ignore the definition of antiquated you are welcome to, but sail power most assuredly doesn't fit the bill. Spinning wheels, yep. Rotary phones, yep. Sails, not by a long shot. It's still one of the most effective and widely used means of propulsion for boats and technology just keeps making it more efficient.

You certainly have an opinion, but you have not come close to making a point.

Brian Palmer
08-09-2014, 10:25 AM
Just a bit more about the Earthrace boat and record that points up just how much farther the sailboats are ahead:

She traveled 23,497 nautical miles [the sailboats went 29,000 miles in 3/4 of the time], through the Panama and Suez Canals, with ten other refuelling stops [the sailboats can and do go non-stop] around the world. The journey, skippered by Earthrace founder, New Zealander, Pete Bethune, took 60 days 23 hours 49 mins (1,463 hours, 49 minutes) finishing back in Spain.

From here:

http://www.earthraceworldrecord.com/index.php?section=125

If anything, it points up that sail is, if anything, different from motors, but certainly not obsolete.

S.V. Airlie
08-09-2014, 01:57 PM
Could as easily be said about one of your favorite pastimes.

The engineering behind these boats is incredible.All it needs is an engine!

beernd
08-09-2014, 03:35 PM
I see racing boats or cars and things like that as a form of art.
So no need for any logic or utility IMHO.

Old Dryfoot
08-10-2014, 01:31 PM
Would this be badass?
Foils for the Vendée Globe boats? (http://www.vendeeglobe.org/en/news/article/14441/foils-for-the-vendee-globe-boats.html)

purri
08-10-2014, 07:32 PM
I watched the first episode yesterday.
badass in pink

http://1yb5dx32zr9j19lz6w18wrwje0m.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/vo65.jpg

Paul Pless
08-10-2014, 07:35 PM
Would this be badass?
Foils for the Vendée Globe boats? (http://www.vendeeglobe.org/en/news/article/14441/foils-for-the-vendee-globe-boats.html)


A giant moth?

Don Kurylko
08-10-2014, 08:56 PM
http://owlshead.org/assets/122/demenjoz__medium.jpeg

An Ekranoplan with sails could certainly be within the realm of possibility some day, given the advance of modern technology. THAT would definitely be badass!

Old Dryfoot
08-10-2014, 11:28 PM
I watched the first episode yesterday.

A handy win for SCA too from what I read.

Old Dryfoot
08-10-2014, 11:35 PM
A giant moth?

With the mayhem scaled to match.

Old Dryfoot
08-11-2014, 11:53 PM
No foils but over forty miles ahead of the Volvo 65's so far.

http://roundbritainandireland.rorc.org/2014-fleet-tracking.html
http://roundbritainandireland.rorc.org/downloads/2014-images/2014-srbi-musandam-omansail-start-rt.jpg
Musandam-Oman Sail starts the Sevenstar Round Britain and Ireland Race.
Photo: Rick Tomlinson rick-tomlinson.com