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Paul Pless
03-14-2004, 09:53 PM
And any other sawyers....

I have recently come accross a confluence of situations that I wish to take advantage of if possible.

One of my neighbors and a good friend to boot, has recently put together a not so portable sawmill. Another, friend, is a tree surgeon. He has offered to me, free, any tree he takes down, if I can haul it off in a reasonable amount of time.

Of course, not every tree he cuts will be usefull, nor will some very desireable trees be able to be cut down in a manner leaving any usefull lengths. For the most part they will be urban trees that are causing landscaping problems or trees that have the potential to cause damage to structures.

I have a truck, trailer, tractor, and winch that will allow me to haul off trees up to 25 feet in length, easily.

My problem, and question, the sawyer and myself may not be able to get to cutting a tree immediately. How long can we leave a tree, with the bark on in an approximate length of 25 feet before sawing it? I am mainly interested in southern yellow pine and the various white and live oaks, but the tree surgeon has indicated to me that he comes accross a very wide variety of species including walnut, pecan, sycamore, locust, and cypress.

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. Also, could you recommend any books on the subject of harvesting, milling, and drying wood? I am a complete novice, but do look forward to having some fun with this.

Thanks,
Paul

Paul Pless
03-14-2004, 09:53 PM
And any other sawyers....

I have recently come accross a confluence of situations that I wish to take advantage of if possible.

One of my neighbors and a good friend to boot, has recently put together a not so portable sawmill. Another, friend, is a tree surgeon. He has offered to me, free, any tree he takes down, if I can haul it off in a reasonable amount of time.

Of course, not every tree he cuts will be usefull, nor will some very desireable trees be able to be cut down in a manner leaving any usefull lengths. For the most part they will be urban trees that are causing landscaping problems or trees that have the potential to cause damage to structures.

I have a truck, trailer, tractor, and winch that will allow me to haul off trees up to 25 feet in length, easily.

My problem, and question, the sawyer and myself may not be able to get to cutting a tree immediately. How long can we leave a tree, with the bark on in an approximate length of 25 feet before sawing it? I am mainly interested in southern yellow pine and the various white and live oaks, but the tree surgeon has indicated to me that he comes accross a very wide variety of species including walnut, pecan, sycamore, locust, and cypress.

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. Also, could you recommend any books on the subject of harvesting, milling, and drying wood? I am a complete novice, but do look forward to having some fun with this.

Thanks,
Paul

Paul Pless
03-14-2004, 09:53 PM
And any other sawyers....

I have recently come accross a confluence of situations that I wish to take advantage of if possible.

One of my neighbors and a good friend to boot, has recently put together a not so portable sawmill. Another, friend, is a tree surgeon. He has offered to me, free, any tree he takes down, if I can haul it off in a reasonable amount of time.

Of course, not every tree he cuts will be usefull, nor will some very desireable trees be able to be cut down in a manner leaving any usefull lengths. For the most part they will be urban trees that are causing landscaping problems or trees that have the potential to cause damage to structures.

I have a truck, trailer, tractor, and winch that will allow me to haul off trees up to 25 feet in length, easily.

My problem, and question, the sawyer and myself may not be able to get to cutting a tree immediately. How long can we leave a tree, with the bark on in an approximate length of 25 feet before sawing it? I am mainly interested in southern yellow pine and the various white and live oaks, but the tree surgeon has indicated to me that he comes accross a very wide variety of species including walnut, pecan, sycamore, locust, and cypress.

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. Also, could you recommend any books on the subject of harvesting, milling, and drying wood? I am a complete novice, but do look forward to having some fun with this.

Thanks,
Paul

Bob Smalser
03-14-2004, 10:23 PM
First a couple of professional sawyer forums:

http://www.woodweb.com/cgi-bin/forums/sawdry.pl

http://sawmillmag.com/forum/

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/milling/messages

Then I'd recommend "Conversion and Seasoning of Wood" from Baileys-online.com...it's British, but it puts it all in one package and the author wrote it to include N. America.

Hope you're just gonna be required to recover the sawlogs, because 85pct of what needs to be either chipped or hauled away for firewood will be a full time job by itself.

And the bark has to come off within a week or so any time the weather is consistently above 55 degrees. Either that or pond them if you can with a water spray. All in all, it's easier to mill them. The consequences are Lyctus beetles infesting the sapwood, which means you lose all your sapwood.

But I suffer Lyctus commonly in the summer...but there's not much sapwood loss in the species I mill and its no big deal....you may have a different problem, especially with SYP which takes decades to grow heartwood.

How you gonna load these sawlogs on and off the truck? And how's the arborist gonna skid them to where you can load them? That's often the hard part, as the necessary machines can't cross sewer lines, septic drainfields or soft turf.

Bob Smalser
03-14-2004, 10:23 PM
First a couple of professional sawyer forums:

http://www.woodweb.com/cgi-bin/forums/sawdry.pl

http://sawmillmag.com/forum/

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/milling/messages

Then I'd recommend "Conversion and Seasoning of Wood" from Baileys-online.com...it's British, but it puts it all in one package and the author wrote it to include N. America.

Hope you're just gonna be required to recover the sawlogs, because 85pct of what needs to be either chipped or hauled away for firewood will be a full time job by itself.

And the bark has to come off within a week or so any time the weather is consistently above 55 degrees. Either that or pond them if you can with a water spray. All in all, it's easier to mill them. The consequences are Lyctus beetles infesting the sapwood, which means you lose all your sapwood.

But I suffer Lyctus commonly in the summer...but there's not much sapwood loss in the species I mill and its no big deal....you may have a different problem, especially with SYP which takes decades to grow heartwood.

How you gonna load these sawlogs on and off the truck? And how's the arborist gonna skid them to where you can load them? That's often the hard part, as the necessary machines can't cross sewer lines, septic drainfields or soft turf.

Bob Smalser
03-14-2004, 10:23 PM
First a couple of professional sawyer forums:

http://www.woodweb.com/cgi-bin/forums/sawdry.pl

http://sawmillmag.com/forum/

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/milling/messages

Then I'd recommend "Conversion and Seasoning of Wood" from Baileys-online.com...it's British, but it puts it all in one package and the author wrote it to include N. America.

Hope you're just gonna be required to recover the sawlogs, because 85pct of what needs to be either chipped or hauled away for firewood will be a full time job by itself.

And the bark has to come off within a week or so any time the weather is consistently above 55 degrees. Either that or pond them if you can with a water spray. All in all, it's easier to mill them. The consequences are Lyctus beetles infesting the sapwood, which means you lose all your sapwood.

But I suffer Lyctus commonly in the summer...but there's not much sapwood loss in the species I mill and its no big deal....you may have a different problem, especially with SYP which takes decades to grow heartwood.

How you gonna load these sawlogs on and off the truck? And how's the arborist gonna skid them to where you can load them? That's often the hard part, as the necessary machines can't cross sewer lines, septic drainfields or soft turf.

Paul Pless
03-14-2004, 10:42 PM
The tree surgeon has been in business a long time, about 30 years. He has a couple of guys that do all his cleanup work for him, I will not be required to cleanup and will actually be taking some of the work off of them.

In addition to my trailer and 10,000 lb Warn, the tree surgeon has a bucket truck that he uses for trimming tops. He has offerred and I have seen him use the bottom leg of the bucket lift to pickup some pretty damn big trees.

In addition to his offer of trees, I also have a few thousand acres of timber land to cruise scattered among central Alabama and south Georgia. I thought I could use his offer as a learning experience.

Thankyou for the prompt response and I look forward to perusing the sawyer forums.

Thanks again,
Paul

p.s. I will keep you advised of how things turn out.

Paul Pless
03-14-2004, 10:42 PM
The tree surgeon has been in business a long time, about 30 years. He has a couple of guys that do all his cleanup work for him, I will not be required to cleanup and will actually be taking some of the work off of them.

In addition to my trailer and 10,000 lb Warn, the tree surgeon has a bucket truck that he uses for trimming tops. He has offerred and I have seen him use the bottom leg of the bucket lift to pickup some pretty damn big trees.

In addition to his offer of trees, I also have a few thousand acres of timber land to cruise scattered among central Alabama and south Georgia. I thought I could use his offer as a learning experience.

Thankyou for the prompt response and I look forward to perusing the sawyer forums.

Thanks again,
Paul

p.s. I will keep you advised of how things turn out.

Paul Pless
03-14-2004, 10:42 PM
The tree surgeon has been in business a long time, about 30 years. He has a couple of guys that do all his cleanup work for him, I will not be required to cleanup and will actually be taking some of the work off of them.

In addition to my trailer and 10,000 lb Warn, the tree surgeon has a bucket truck that he uses for trimming tops. He has offerred and I have seen him use the bottom leg of the bucket lift to pickup some pretty damn big trees.

In addition to his offer of trees, I also have a few thousand acres of timber land to cruise scattered among central Alabama and south Georgia. I thought I could use his offer as a learning experience.

Thankyou for the prompt response and I look forward to perusing the sawyer forums.

Thanks again,
Paul

p.s. I will keep you advised of how things turn out.

Ron Williamson
03-15-2004, 05:57 AM
Keeping logs off the ground and painting the ends will help.
R

Ron Williamson
03-15-2004, 05:57 AM
Keeping logs off the ground and painting the ends will help.
R

Ron Williamson
03-15-2004, 05:57 AM
Keeping logs off the ground and painting the ends will help.
R