PDA

View Full Version : Hardy Hemp



Tom Galyen
12-02-2000, 08:40 PM
I have an 18th century replica "jolly boat" and need to replace some lines. To keep it as original as possible I would like to replace the lines with Hardy Hemp. This product is supposed to look and work like actual hemp. I've seen it in articles on English boats but have not seen any reference to it in the U.S. Can anyone help me?

Tom Galyen
12-02-2000, 08:40 PM
I have an 18th century replica "jolly boat" and need to replace some lines. To keep it as original as possible I would like to replace the lines with Hardy Hemp. This product is supposed to look and work like actual hemp. I've seen it in articles on English boats but have not seen any reference to it in the U.S. Can anyone help me?

Tom Galyen
12-02-2000, 08:40 PM
I have an 18th century replica "jolly boat" and need to replace some lines. To keep it as original as possible I would like to replace the lines with Hardy Hemp. This product is supposed to look and work like actual hemp. I've seen it in articles on English boats but have not seen any reference to it in the U.S. Can anyone help me?

Jonathan Kabak
12-03-2000, 04:50 PM
Tom-

Hardy Hemp is a pretty reputable product from the conversations I have had with fellow sailors from the British sail training vessels. One of the reasons that it is not well known in the US is because of Roblon (sp?). Both are synthetic manilla products but from everyone I have talked to Hardy hemp is far superior. Roblon has notorious streching problems, is terribly UV degradable, and generally ain't so good. All the seynthetic manillas are I believe made from polypro so that they are going to get major sun and abrasion damage.

best of luck in your choice,

Jonathan Kabak

Jonathan Kabak
12-03-2000, 04:50 PM
Tom-

Hardy Hemp is a pretty reputable product from the conversations I have had with fellow sailors from the British sail training vessels. One of the reasons that it is not well known in the US is because of Roblon (sp?). Both are synthetic manilla products but from everyone I have talked to Hardy hemp is far superior. Roblon has notorious streching problems, is terribly UV degradable, and generally ain't so good. All the seynthetic manillas are I believe made from polypro so that they are going to get major sun and abrasion damage.

best of luck in your choice,

Jonathan Kabak

Jonathan Kabak
12-03-2000, 04:50 PM
Tom-

Hardy Hemp is a pretty reputable product from the conversations I have had with fellow sailors from the British sail training vessels. One of the reasons that it is not well known in the US is because of Roblon (sp?). Both are synthetic manilla products but from everyone I have talked to Hardy hemp is far superior. Roblon has notorious streching problems, is terribly UV degradable, and generally ain't so good. All the seynthetic manillas are I believe made from polypro so that they are going to get major sun and abrasion damage.

best of luck in your choice,

Jonathan Kabak

Mike Field
12-03-2000, 08:10 PM
I understand this material is "fibrillated polypropylene," so it does need care as Jonathan says. I'm currently using it on both Sanderling and Aileen Louisa, and I'm quite happy with it.

An alternative brand (also from the UK, I think) is Hempex. Its surface fibres are smaller and more numerous, giving it a somewhat matted-looking finish but a nicer feel when handling.

Mike Field
12-03-2000, 08:10 PM
I understand this material is "fibrillated polypropylene," so it does need care as Jonathan says. I'm currently using it on both Sanderling and Aileen Louisa, and I'm quite happy with it.

An alternative brand (also from the UK, I think) is Hempex. Its surface fibres are smaller and more numerous, giving it a somewhat matted-looking finish but a nicer feel when handling.

Mike Field
12-03-2000, 08:10 PM
I understand this material is "fibrillated polypropylene," so it does need care as Jonathan says. I'm currently using it on both Sanderling and Aileen Louisa, and I'm quite happy with it.

An alternative brand (also from the UK, I think) is Hempex. Its surface fibres are smaller and more numerous, giving it a somewhat matted-looking finish but a nicer feel when handling.

Yanis Abols
12-04-2000, 02:22 PM
Greetings from Normandy,

Hempex is manufactured by a German company: Gleistein tauwerk. Their adress is: www.gleistein.com (http://www.gleistein.com) They can certainly give you a listing of their distributors in the U.S.
Other european manufacturers of tradional ropes that I know of and that may sell in the U.S. are:
FSE , an austrian company, E.mail: fiberope@teufelberg.com
and Corderies Henri Lancelin, French, WWW.corderie-lancelin.fr (http://WWW.corderie-lancelin.fr)

Yanis Abols
12-04-2000, 02:22 PM
Greetings from Normandy,

Hempex is manufactured by a German company: Gleistein tauwerk. Their adress is: www.gleistein.com (http://www.gleistein.com) They can certainly give you a listing of their distributors in the U.S.
Other european manufacturers of tradional ropes that I know of and that may sell in the U.S. are:
FSE , an austrian company, E.mail: fiberope@teufelberg.com
and Corderies Henri Lancelin, French, WWW.corderie-lancelin.fr (http://WWW.corderie-lancelin.fr)

Yanis Abols
12-04-2000, 02:22 PM
Greetings from Normandy,

Hempex is manufactured by a German company: Gleistein tauwerk. Their adress is: www.gleistein.com (http://www.gleistein.com) They can certainly give you a listing of their distributors in the U.S.
Other european manufacturers of tradional ropes that I know of and that may sell in the U.S. are:
FSE , an austrian company, E.mail: fiberope@teufelberg.com
and Corderies Henri Lancelin, French, WWW.corderie-lancelin.fr (http://WWW.corderie-lancelin.fr)

Tom Jackson
12-05-2000, 01:30 PM
I have used Hardy Hemp before, and I found it very nice. However, over the course of a few seasons it seemed to lose its favorable appearance, becoming more plastic-looking. It used to be available through The Wooden Boat Shop in Seattle (alas, no more), and is now available through Imtra Corporation <http://www.imtra.com/about.cfm> in New Bedford.

Randers Reb makes a hemp-look-alike, and I have a 1" sample of it on my desk, called "Navy Flex." It is available in the U.S. through Euro Products, Inc., 1557 N.W. Ballard Way, Seattle, WA 98107, 206-789-6468. I believe that Roblon has divested its rope-making division in favor of higher-tech industrial applications and fibre-optics, and Randers Reb, I think, is the result. I've never used Navy Flex in practice, so I can't judge it. The sample has a very plastic feel, but it is said to take on hemp-like characteristics after a few weeks of use, and it is used by many of the well-known square-riggers.

Gleistein is advertising a new traditional rope, which could be very interesting. I have asked them for information regarding U.S. distributors.

I am in the process of researching an article about traditional hemp rope, which, I think, stands a chance of making a comeback now that industrial hemp production has been legalized in Canada and in four U.S. states. Russia and Romania still have active hemp cordage industries, so does China and perhaps other Asian countries. Some hemp rope is made in Canada, but apparently the quality is not the best, and the law allows either hemp fiber or flax fiber to be used.

Does anyone have information about sources for true hemp rope?

Tom Jackson
12-05-2000, 01:30 PM
I have used Hardy Hemp before, and I found it very nice. However, over the course of a few seasons it seemed to lose its favorable appearance, becoming more plastic-looking. It used to be available through The Wooden Boat Shop in Seattle (alas, no more), and is now available through Imtra Corporation <http://www.imtra.com/about.cfm> in New Bedford.

Randers Reb makes a hemp-look-alike, and I have a 1" sample of it on my desk, called "Navy Flex." It is available in the U.S. through Euro Products, Inc., 1557 N.W. Ballard Way, Seattle, WA 98107, 206-789-6468. I believe that Roblon has divested its rope-making division in favor of higher-tech industrial applications and fibre-optics, and Randers Reb, I think, is the result. I've never used Navy Flex in practice, so I can't judge it. The sample has a very plastic feel, but it is said to take on hemp-like characteristics after a few weeks of use, and it is used by many of the well-known square-riggers.

Gleistein is advertising a new traditional rope, which could be very interesting. I have asked them for information regarding U.S. distributors.

I am in the process of researching an article about traditional hemp rope, which, I think, stands a chance of making a comeback now that industrial hemp production has been legalized in Canada and in four U.S. states. Russia and Romania still have active hemp cordage industries, so does China and perhaps other Asian countries. Some hemp rope is made in Canada, but apparently the quality is not the best, and the law allows either hemp fiber or flax fiber to be used.

Does anyone have information about sources for true hemp rope?

Tom Jackson
12-05-2000, 01:30 PM
I have used Hardy Hemp before, and I found it very nice. However, over the course of a few seasons it seemed to lose its favorable appearance, becoming more plastic-looking. It used to be available through The Wooden Boat Shop in Seattle (alas, no more), and is now available through Imtra Corporation <http://www.imtra.com/about.cfm> in New Bedford.

Randers Reb makes a hemp-look-alike, and I have a 1" sample of it on my desk, called "Navy Flex." It is available in the U.S. through Euro Products, Inc., 1557 N.W. Ballard Way, Seattle, WA 98107, 206-789-6468. I believe that Roblon has divested its rope-making division in favor of higher-tech industrial applications and fibre-optics, and Randers Reb, I think, is the result. I've never used Navy Flex in practice, so I can't judge it. The sample has a very plastic feel, but it is said to take on hemp-like characteristics after a few weeks of use, and it is used by many of the well-known square-riggers.

Gleistein is advertising a new traditional rope, which could be very interesting. I have asked them for information regarding U.S. distributors.

I am in the process of researching an article about traditional hemp rope, which, I think, stands a chance of making a comeback now that industrial hemp production has been legalized in Canada and in four U.S. states. Russia and Romania still have active hemp cordage industries, so does China and perhaps other Asian countries. Some hemp rope is made in Canada, but apparently the quality is not the best, and the law allows either hemp fiber or flax fiber to be used.

Does anyone have information about sources for true hemp rope?

Thad
12-05-2000, 04:21 PM
Seattle Merchantile, 800-469-4367

Thad
12-05-2000, 04:21 PM
Seattle Merchantile, 800-469-4367

Thad
12-05-2000, 04:21 PM
Seattle Merchantile, 800-469-4367

Kermit
12-05-2000, 04:58 PM
Why not just use real hemp? It can be found. What sizes and lengths are we talking here? I'm also a muzzleloader/reenactor, and I look for every opportunity to take another step back and use real stuff. Have you tried your local hemp store?

Kermit
12-05-2000, 04:58 PM
Why not just use real hemp? It can be found. What sizes and lengths are we talking here? I'm also a muzzleloader/reenactor, and I look for every opportunity to take another step back and use real stuff. Have you tried your local hemp store?

Kermit
12-05-2000, 04:58 PM
Why not just use real hemp? It can be found. What sizes and lengths are we talking here? I'm also a muzzleloader/reenactor, and I look for every opportunity to take another step back and use real stuff. Have you tried your local hemp store?

Tom Galyen
12-05-2000, 09:37 PM
Thanks Kermit,

I actually have a roll of 3/8" hemp that was given to me as a Christmas gift about 2 years ago. The trouble is that it is to large to use on my boat as the blocks apparently sized for 1/4".

Also, because of where I work, I'm subject to random drug testing and do not really want to take a chance of failing one because I was using the hemp line. I've been told that it shouldn't show up but they keep getting more sensitive and I would like to keep my job. How else could I pay for my fun?

Tom Galyen
12-05-2000, 09:37 PM
Thanks Kermit,

I actually have a roll of 3/8" hemp that was given to me as a Christmas gift about 2 years ago. The trouble is that it is to large to use on my boat as the blocks apparently sized for 1/4".

Also, because of where I work, I'm subject to random drug testing and do not really want to take a chance of failing one because I was using the hemp line. I've been told that it shouldn't show up but they keep getting more sensitive and I would like to keep my job. How else could I pay for my fun?

Tom Galyen
12-05-2000, 09:37 PM
Thanks Kermit,

I actually have a roll of 3/8" hemp that was given to me as a Christmas gift about 2 years ago. The trouble is that it is to large to use on my boat as the blocks apparently sized for 1/4".

Also, because of where I work, I'm subject to random drug testing and do not really want to take a chance of failing one because I was using the hemp line. I've been told that it shouldn't show up but they keep getting more sensitive and I would like to keep my job. How else could I pay for my fun?

Kermit
12-05-2000, 10:29 PM
The testing is THAT sensitive??? Bummer. You've got me wondering about the hemp wallet my daughter gave me. Will I lose my job accused of using THC suppositories?

Watch yer topknot.

Kermit
12-05-2000, 10:29 PM
The testing is THAT sensitive??? Bummer. You've got me wondering about the hemp wallet my daughter gave me. Will I lose my job accused of using THC suppositories?

Watch yer topknot.

Kermit
12-05-2000, 10:29 PM
The testing is THAT sensitive??? Bummer. You've got me wondering about the hemp wallet my daughter gave me. Will I lose my job accused of using THC suppositories?

Watch yer topknot.

Mike Field
12-06-2000, 01:28 AM
Well, I've discovered that Hempex is in fact made in Germany by Gleistein, who've just been in touch with me.

They say -- "Fibrilated, yet highly UV stabilized PP yarns are being mechanically torn into short pieces and then spun like a traditional, all natural hemp fibre into a staple fibre yarn. The advantages are all natural grip, good break loads and a very high UV stability, paired with very low stretch."

Their new material, mentioned by Tom, is called Thempest, and is shown on their website. (The website looks very swish, but I didn't find it terribly informative. You need to click on "News" to see about Thempest.)

They tell me that they also supply traditional (non-artificial) hemp as well.

Mike Field
12-06-2000, 01:28 AM
Well, I've discovered that Hempex is in fact made in Germany by Gleistein, who've just been in touch with me.

They say -- "Fibrilated, yet highly UV stabilized PP yarns are being mechanically torn into short pieces and then spun like a traditional, all natural hemp fibre into a staple fibre yarn. The advantages are all natural grip, good break loads and a very high UV stability, paired with very low stretch."

Their new material, mentioned by Tom, is called Thempest, and is shown on their website. (The website looks very swish, but I didn't find it terribly informative. You need to click on "News" to see about Thempest.)

They tell me that they also supply traditional (non-artificial) hemp as well.

Mike Field
12-06-2000, 01:28 AM
Well, I've discovered that Hempex is in fact made in Germany by Gleistein, who've just been in touch with me.

They say -- "Fibrilated, yet highly UV stabilized PP yarns are being mechanically torn into short pieces and then spun like a traditional, all natural hemp fibre into a staple fibre yarn. The advantages are all natural grip, good break loads and a very high UV stability, paired with very low stretch."

Their new material, mentioned by Tom, is called Thempest, and is shown on their website. (The website looks very swish, but I didn't find it terribly informative. You need to click on "News" to see about Thempest.)

They tell me that they also supply traditional (non-artificial) hemp as well.

Perry Olten
12-06-2000, 12:36 PM
I really don't think you have to worry about absorbing THC from handling hemp line. If hemp had THC in it, then it would be considered a controlled substance like marijuana and would be illegal(and "heads" all over the world would literally be smoking rope).

Perry Olten
12-06-2000, 12:36 PM
I really don't think you have to worry about absorbing THC from handling hemp line. If hemp had THC in it, then it would be considered a controlled substance like marijuana and would be illegal(and "heads" all over the world would literally be smoking rope).

Perry Olten
12-06-2000, 12:36 PM
I really don't think you have to worry about absorbing THC from handling hemp line. If hemp had THC in it, then it would be considered a controlled substance like marijuana and would be illegal(and "heads" all over the world would literally be smoking rope).

Smacksman
12-06-2000, 04:31 PM
I went into rope in some detail on my smack page with tables of strengths and stretch, http://www.alberta-ck318.freeserve.co.uk/rope.htm
How anyone can call polypropylene rope 'low stretch' beats me! It's closer to nylon for stretch than any of the other synthetics.
A lot of trad boats here tried Hempex and similar polyprop ropes and all dumped them because of stretch.
They still make sisal and hemp rope at the Royal Chatham Dock Yard, Kent, UK and I used some on my smack. Dreadful stuff compared to modern rope. When wet it is like wire and ultimate strength is poor compared to modern rope.
I would go for 16 plait matt polyester every time and let it get ethnically dirty.

Smacksman
12-06-2000, 04:31 PM
I went into rope in some detail on my smack page with tables of strengths and stretch, http://www.alberta-ck318.freeserve.co.uk/rope.htm
How anyone can call polypropylene rope 'low stretch' beats me! It's closer to nylon for stretch than any of the other synthetics.
A lot of trad boats here tried Hempex and similar polyprop ropes and all dumped them because of stretch.
They still make sisal and hemp rope at the Royal Chatham Dock Yard, Kent, UK and I used some on my smack. Dreadful stuff compared to modern rope. When wet it is like wire and ultimate strength is poor compared to modern rope.
I would go for 16 plait matt polyester every time and let it get ethnically dirty.

Smacksman
12-06-2000, 04:31 PM
I went into rope in some detail on my smack page with tables of strengths and stretch, http://www.alberta-ck318.freeserve.co.uk/rope.htm
How anyone can call polypropylene rope 'low stretch' beats me! It's closer to nylon for stretch than any of the other synthetics.
A lot of trad boats here tried Hempex and similar polyprop ropes and all dumped them because of stretch.
They still make sisal and hemp rope at the Royal Chatham Dock Yard, Kent, UK and I used some on my smack. Dreadful stuff compared to modern rope. When wet it is like wire and ultimate strength is poor compared to modern rope.
I would go for 16 plait matt polyester every time and let it get ethnically dirty.

Kermit
12-07-2000, 10:10 PM
Are we talking Dope-in-a-rope here? I've been wondering just how long the USofA is going to allow the rest of the world to profit from industrial hemp farming and deny our own farmers a chance to compete in the open market. There was a VERY interesting article in about the last issue of Utne Reader which points out how we got our country into this fix--and who the fatcats were/are who benefit from villaniizing the lowly hemp-fiber plant.

Kermit
12-07-2000, 10:10 PM
Are we talking Dope-in-a-rope here? I've been wondering just how long the USofA is going to allow the rest of the world to profit from industrial hemp farming and deny our own farmers a chance to compete in the open market. There was a VERY interesting article in about the last issue of Utne Reader which points out how we got our country into this fix--and who the fatcats were/are who benefit from villaniizing the lowly hemp-fiber plant.

Kermit
12-07-2000, 10:10 PM
Are we talking Dope-in-a-rope here? I've been wondering just how long the USofA is going to allow the rest of the world to profit from industrial hemp farming and deny our own farmers a chance to compete in the open market. There was a VERY interesting article in about the last issue of Utne Reader which points out how we got our country into this fix--and who the fatcats were/are who benefit from villaniizing the lowly hemp-fiber plant.

NormMessinger
12-08-2000, 09:20 AM
Yes indeed, and another problem in the USofA is suggested by a comparison of deaths from Marijauna abuse vs. deaths from alcohol abuse.

--Norm

NormMessinger
12-08-2000, 09:20 AM
Yes indeed, and another problem in the USofA is suggested by a comparison of deaths from Marijauna abuse vs. deaths from alcohol abuse.

--Norm

NormMessinger
12-08-2000, 09:20 AM
Yes indeed, and another problem in the USofA is suggested by a comparison of deaths from Marijauna abuse vs. deaths from alcohol abuse.

--Norm