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Rum_Pirate
06-29-2014, 03:57 PM
I realised that when spirits are served in a UK pub a good splosh is put into the glass and then swilled around, after which it is poured back into the bottle and the remnants that drain down the side into the base of the glass is your measure.


I was having a drink with my sister at a bar here. She had a screwdriver (vodka & orange for the uninitiated).


After the first sip, she said " In UK, I can never taste the vodka. Here I can't taste the orange juice." :ycool:




We allow our children to have a sip of whatever my wife are drinking so as not to have them have a mystery about it when they get older.
The usual response is 'Ugh!'




My daughter (aged 11) recently took a sip of a Screwdriver that my wife was drinking and said "Mmm, that tastes much better than the orange juice we get at school."


I personally do not like an overly strong drink, i.e. generally not more than a 1/2 gill, unless I am drinking it on the rocks.


How do you like your measures?

Stiletto
06-29-2014, 05:48 PM
I like to taste the liquor. It seems pointless to have the mixer overwhelming the spirit.

S/V Laura Ellen
06-29-2014, 05:49 PM
Depends on what spirits and mix are being used!
One of my favourites is the Manhattan.
A couple ounces of very good Rye, then wave a bottle of vermouth over the glass and garnish with a Maraschino Cherry.

AndyG
06-29-2014, 05:59 PM
I realised that when spirits are served in a UK pub a good splosh is put into the glass and then swilled around, after which it is poured back into the bottle and the remnants that drain down the side into the base of the glass is your measure.

You're going to the wrong pubs. The Weights and Measures Act (1963) frowns on that sort of thing. A quarter gill is now usually (these EU days) 35ml in Scotland.

Andy

S/V Laura Ellen
06-29-2014, 07:13 PM
You're going to the wrong pubs. The Weights and Measures Act (1963) frowns on that sort of thing. A quarter gill is now usually (these EU days) 35ml in Scotland.

Andy

It's no fun if you are going to use facts in this discussion!:(

Phillip Allen
06-29-2014, 07:17 PM
who knows what a gill is?

Domesticated_Mr. Know It All
06-29-2014, 07:23 PM
When I was a bartender, I always made the first drink strong, after that most can't taste anyway but they remember the first drink when tipping.
The more drinks they order, the weaker they got.
That's just responsible bartending.
If you're at home measuring your own, well.....heh heh.....lucky you.

Phillip Allen
06-29-2014, 07:33 PM
When I was a bartender, I always made the first drink strong, after that most can't taste anyway but they remember the first drink when tipping.
The more drinks they order, the weaker they got.
That's just responsible bartending.
If you're at home measuring your own, well.....heh heh.....lucky you.


very capitalistic

Rum_Pirate
06-29-2014, 07:48 PM
who knows what a gill is?

About 4 gills to a pint (imperial not US units)

Waddie
06-29-2014, 07:52 PM
I don't like mixed drinks. When I want whiskey I want whiskey. When I want vodka I want vodka. When I want orange juice I drink orange juice. Keeps life simple.

BTW; I really like Glenlivet.

regards,
Waddie

Phillip Allen
06-29-2014, 07:54 PM
About 4 gills to a pint (imperial not US units)

yep... confirmed by Machinery's Handbook 15th edition :)

seanz
06-29-2014, 07:57 PM
who knows what a gill is?

A gill is someone that shouldn't be supping screwdrivers.

Paul Pless
06-29-2014, 08:03 PM
No one likes a weak cocktail, especially one that they are paying for.
That said I don't like my mixed drinks too strong either.
If I really want to sip something strong, I'll order a whiskey, or a whisky, or a bourbon or maybe in a blue moon an agave tequila straight, rarely with ice, never with water. . .

bobbys
06-29-2014, 10:45 PM
I like my Shirley temples with ice and 2cherries.

paulf
06-29-2014, 11:20 PM
4 fingers of Cognac. Use my friend Benski who has hands like hams to indicate the level!

Hey dude, we don't have liter snifters here!

Breakaway
06-30-2014, 01:08 AM
Well, Martinis and Manhattans and their variants have to be excepted, since they are all booze.

For a screwdriver or other cocktail made with a mixer, you want to taste the liquor.


http://forum.woodenboat.com/images/misc/quote_icon.png Originally Posted by Domesticated_Mr. Know It All http://forum.woodenboat.com/images/buttons/viewpost-right.png (http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthread.php?p=4210113#post4210113)
When I was a bartender, I always made the first drink strong, after that most can't taste anyway but they remember the first drink when tipping.
The more drinks they order, the weaker they got.
That's just responsible bartending.
If you're at home measuring your own, well.....heh heh.....lucky you.



When I was tending, I went for a checkup and the doc asked how many shots I drank per shift. I told him. Then he asked me: " Do you fill the glass to the line? Or to the top?" I told him: " Doc, I'm pouring."

Kevin

P.I. Stazzer-Newt
06-30-2014, 02:18 AM
You're going to the wrong pubs. The Weights and Measures Act (1963) frowns on that sort of thing. A quarter gill is now usually (these EU days) 35ml in Scotland.

Andy

You lucky lucky man - forty years ago barely one pub in ten was still on quarters - most were on fifths - and in England, sixths!

Laphroig - straight, no ice.

varadero
06-30-2014, 05:18 AM
My father always protected his wiskey glass when drinking in the pub. When the barman would try to give him a clean glass, he would say, "I have payed for the lining on that one"

Garret
06-30-2014, 05:37 AM
Interesting bit on "gill": http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/233688/gill.


gill, also spelled jill, in measurement, unit (http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/615255/unit) of volume (http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/632569/volume) in the British Imperial (http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/80231/British-Imperial-System) and United States Customary systems. It is used almost exclusively for the measurement of liquids. Although its capacity has varied with time and location, in the United States it is defined as half a cup (http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/146659/cup), or four U.S. fluid ounces, which equals 7.219 cubic inches, or 118.29 cubic cm; in Great Britain (http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/243007/Great-Britain) the gill is five British fluid ounces, which equals 8.669 cubic inches, one-fourth pint (http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/461186/pint), or 142.07 cubic cm.
The gill was introduced in the 14th century to measure individual servings of whiskey or wine. The term jill appears in the nursery rhyme “Jack and Jill.” Soon after ascending to the throne of England in 1625, King Charles I (http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/106686/Charles-I) scaled down the jack (http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/298687/jack) or jackpot (sometimes known as a double jigger) in order to collect higher sales taxes. The jill, by definition twice the size of the jack, was automatically reduced also and “came tumbling after.”



I'm trying to get my head around the OP's description of a pour. You are saying that the bartender/publican would pour a bunch of booze in a glass, coat the sides, & then pour it back in the bottle? How big a glass? How much does that get you? If not a large glass I'd think it'd be maybe a teaspoon. Even a straight-up drink like whiskey would be served this way?

varadero
06-30-2014, 08:00 AM
In England, they never pour a "bunch" of booze in the glass. You get a measure, which at best does nothing more than coat the sides, (line), of the glass

jonboy
06-30-2014, 08:55 AM
A Gill ...well my sister in law's a Gill and she can drink the lot of us under the table.

The English pubs are changing... the standard shot of spirits was carefully controlled, dispensed by an 'optic' the upside down bottle with the inverted valve thing...or a small metal cup in various official sizes singles, doubles, etc I have known customers claiming the meniscus wasn't high enough with the cups...

Things are relaxing a bit....I haven't lived there for years but as a frequent visitor the little changes are noticed....these days spirit 'singles' are often offered as doubles for much less than twice the price or even happy hour two for the price of one .... and the profit to the publican is always in the mixers, a rum costs 'x', a rum and a splash of coke and a slice of lemon and an icecube costs 3x 'x' .....

A good publican would always pour the spirit into the cup over the glass so as a bit more spills in, and he does it in the customer's view. or he taps the optic a tad to give a little more....
We used to drink beer mixes, light and bitter, brown and bitter in the North, where you pay for a half pint of pulled beer and a half pint bottle on the side. If the server didn't give at least 3/4 pint you felt you were being ripped off.

If Rum Pirate has experienced what he says its unusual and he's definitely going to the wrong pubs, like the ones Mr Know it all works in.

Come to Portugal, if you ask for a 'digestiv' after the meal, a whisky or aguardente or (not french) brandy they often just bring the bottle over and leave it on the table... help yourself. Ask for a post prandial coffee and a 'cheirinho'... a little 'whiff' of some spirit, a, you won't pay anymore than the coffee, b, they again will often just leave the bottle with you as a cheirinho can be a shot on the side again help yourself....

Canoez
06-30-2014, 09:00 AM
http://www.rbwm.gov.uk/graphics/sml_ts_pint-glass-lined_150x159(2).jpg

jonboy
06-30-2014, 09:49 AM
As I said, things are changing

...in the south of England the beer had to reach the top of the pint glass,... who wants to pay for and drink fizzy froth? in the north they always want that, and so before the common acceptance of lined pint glasses you would get maybe 5 -10% less beer....It's still common to find northern beer dispensers with a gizmo on the nozzle to impart worthless froth, but at least the volume of the glass allows for this curiosity... I know this is anathema to most, but give me a still , room temperature ale that actually has a flavour and is a joy to taste, than a chilled frothy CO2 tainted nothingness.

Except here, of course, where it was 110 in the shade last week

Wouldn't want a Fuller's ESB here, wouldn't want a Superbock in the UK.

Phillip Allen
06-30-2014, 10:50 AM
A Gill ...well my sister in law's a Gill and she can drink the lot of us under the table.

The English pubs are changing... the standard shot of spirits was carefully controlled, dispensed by an 'optic' the upside down bottle with the inverted valve thing...or a small metal cup in various official sizes singles, doubles, etc I have known customers claiming the meniscus wasn't high enough with the cups...

Things are relaxing a bit....I haven't lived there for years but as a frequent visitor the little changes are noticed....these days spirit 'singles' are often offered as doubles for much less than twice the price or even happy hour two for the price of one .... and the profit to the publican is always in the mixers, a rum costs 'x', a rum and a splash of coke and a slice of lemon and an icecube costs 3x 'x' .....

A good publican would always pour the spirit into the cup over the glass so as a bit more spills in, and he does it in the customer's view. or he taps the optic a tad to give a little more....
We used to drink beer mixes, light and bitter, brown and bitter in the North, where you pay for a half pint of pulled beer and a half pint bottle on the side. If the server didn't give at least 3/4 pint you felt you were being ripped off.

If Rum Pirate has experienced what he says its unusual and he's definitely going to the wrong pubs, like the ones Mr Know it all works in.

Come to Portugal, if you ask for a 'digestiv' after the meal, a whisky or aguardente or (not french) brandy they often just bring the bottle over and leave it on the table... help yourself. Ask for a post prandial coffee and a 'cheirinho'... a little 'whiff' of some spirit, a, you won't pay anymore than the coffee, b, they again will often just leave the bottle with you as a cheirinho can be a shot on the side again help yourself....

I don't drink but stories llike that above is why I've always wanted to sail to Portugal :)

isla
06-30-2014, 10:57 AM
This is a dram...as Andy said 35ml

http://www.orbsbooks.co.uk/images/dram.jpg

isla
06-30-2014, 11:23 AM
In the UK the law is very strict about how drinks are dispensed. Publicans can choose to serve either 25ml or 35ml shots. This is from the Trading Standards Department of Gloucestershire (http://www.tradingstandards.gov.uk/cgi-bin/glos/bus1item.cgi?file=*badv058-1001.txt), but it will be the same across the UK.


GIN, RUM, WHISKY AND VODKA
Unless sold in cocktails of three or more drinks, these products may only be sold in the following quantities:

25ml
35ml, or
multiples of these quantities

If you have switched to 35ml measures, the 25ml thimbles must be removed from the bar to avoid mistakes. Also, If you use 35ml measures for single shots, you cannot use 50ml for doubles. The correct double would be 2 x 35ml.

Old imperial measures (such as 1/6 gill) cannot be used for the sale of any spirits.

A notice, which is easy for consumers to read, must make it clear which quantity applies - for example: 'Gin, rum, whisky and vodka are sold on these premises in quantities of 25ml and multiples thereof'.

The same quantity must apply in all the bars of your pub, restaurant, or cafe - in other words, 25ml and 35ml specified quantities must not be sold at the same premises.

In Scotland the 35ml measure is the most commonly used.