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Ross Faneuf
02-17-2001, 09:19 AM
It's time to fit out Ceol Mor with mattresses in the bunks and cushions as needed. What do you folks recommend for thickness/hardness/ etc for berths & cushions? How about covering materials?

Ross Faneuf
02-17-2001, 09:19 AM
It's time to fit out Ceol Mor with mattresses in the bunks and cushions as needed. What do you folks recommend for thickness/hardness/ etc for berths & cushions? How about covering materials?

Ross Faneuf
02-17-2001, 09:19 AM
It's time to fit out Ceol Mor with mattresses in the bunks and cushions as needed. What do you folks recommend for thickness/hardness/ etc for berths & cushions? How about covering materials?

paladin
02-17-2001, 11:25 AM
Tana Mari's berths and cushions are 4.5 inches thick from foam obtained in Kitplanes magazine supposedly the same stuff they use on the astronauts seats. Really comfortable, but a wee more expensive than regular foam. I would consider three different densities of foam glued together to make the thickness, covered with treated cotton duck and covered with your choice of patterns of some scotchguard treated fabric....works for me and the Cocker Spaniel......

paladin
02-17-2001, 11:25 AM
Tana Mari's berths and cushions are 4.5 inches thick from foam obtained in Kitplanes magazine supposedly the same stuff they use on the astronauts seats. Really comfortable, but a wee more expensive than regular foam. I would consider three different densities of foam glued together to make the thickness, covered with treated cotton duck and covered with your choice of patterns of some scotchguard treated fabric....works for me and the Cocker Spaniel......

paladin
02-17-2001, 11:25 AM
Tana Mari's berths and cushions are 4.5 inches thick from foam obtained in Kitplanes magazine supposedly the same stuff they use on the astronauts seats. Really comfortable, but a wee more expensive than regular foam. I would consider three different densities of foam glued together to make the thickness, covered with treated cotton duck and covered with your choice of patterns of some scotchguard treated fabric....works for me and the Cocker Spaniel......

NormMessinger
02-17-2001, 12:39 PM
Ross, I was gonna ask the same question. Sailrite sells foam they brag on for that purpose but it is a bit pricy, though nothing nearly like the stuff the astronauts used if we are thinking of the same stuff. I bought 1.5" thick mattress foam for the seat in my LongEZ which is just fine for sitting so I will explore same but thicker for the bunks in Prairie Islander. Maybe should look at the stuff pal. suggests too but one wouldn't need the crash resistance.

--Norm

NormMessinger
02-17-2001, 12:39 PM
Ross, I was gonna ask the same question. Sailrite sells foam they brag on for that purpose but it is a bit pricy, though nothing nearly like the stuff the astronauts used if we are thinking of the same stuff. I bought 1.5" thick mattress foam for the seat in my LongEZ which is just fine for sitting so I will explore same but thicker for the bunks in Prairie Islander. Maybe should look at the stuff pal. suggests too but one wouldn't need the crash resistance.

--Norm

NormMessinger
02-17-2001, 12:39 PM
Ross, I was gonna ask the same question. Sailrite sells foam they brag on for that purpose but it is a bit pricy, though nothing nearly like the stuff the astronauts used if we are thinking of the same stuff. I bought 1.5" thick mattress foam for the seat in my LongEZ which is just fine for sitting so I will explore same but thicker for the bunks in Prairie Islander. Maybe should look at the stuff pal. suggests too but one wouldn't need the crash resistance.

--Norm

Jean Sheldon
02-17-2001, 07:42 PM
There are 3 basic types of foam suitable for boats. Closed cell foam has the advantage of not absorbing any water. It makes great cockpit cushions, and you can even throw your cushions overboard and float on them. Closed cell foam is generally hard and not necessarily comfortable to sit or sleep on for any length of time. “Reticulated” foam is completely open cell. The idea is that water and air flow through so if the cushions get wet they’ll dry fast. The problem with this foam is that it is very soft and does not support most normal sized people. In other words, you tend to “bottom-out” with this type of foam and after a couple of years it stays flat! “Regular” polyurethane foam is generally the best choice for interior cushions since you are looking for comfort, and the bonus is it is less expensive. Hopefully, rain and seawater are not a problem down below as the disadvantage with this type of foam is that it tends to soak up water and hold on to it.

As far as “hardness” goes, the foam’s “compression” is the number of pounds it take to compress one square foot of foam 1”. For seats, 50 lb foam will support an adult’s weight well. Comfort-wise, 60 lb maybe too hard. For backs, you want softer foam that you can sink in to as it does not have to support your whole weight. For berths, if you like a firm mattress, 50 lb is probably as high as you want to go.

4” thickness foam is pretty much standard for the salon. For sleeping, generally, the thicker the better. In a V-berth, because of the shape of the hull, the higher you go, the more room you’ll have side to side, but then you have to consider the head room too. Usually 6” foam makes a nice bed. Keep in mind that too-thick foam in a small space can tend to “fill-up” a boat and make the boat seem smaller.

I recommend that you stay away from untreated cotton fabrics for cushion covers unless you can control the temperature and humidity in your boat the way you do in your home. Mildew likes to eat cotton, so try to stick with a synthetic fabric. Sunbrella Furniture Fabric is perfect for boat interiors. It’s 100% acrylic and available in lots of colors and patterns. Also check regular upholstery fabrics. “Natural” fabrics are very popular these days, but try to keep the cotton content to a minimum. If condensation is a problem, you might consider using a vinyl fabric on the cushion bottoms.

A few comments for anyone considering re-covering old foam: 1.) Foam absorbs all the odors in the boat (holding tank, diesel, gasoline) so your nice new covers will soon smell like your nasty old foam. 2.) You may think your foam is still good until you sit on some new foam. The difference will surprise you. 3.) Foam shrinks over time, so unless you add new foam to your old foam, your “new” cushions will end up smaller than the space they’re supposed to fit in.

Good luck!

Jean Sheldon

Jean Sheldon
02-17-2001, 07:42 PM
There are 3 basic types of foam suitable for boats. Closed cell foam has the advantage of not absorbing any water. It makes great cockpit cushions, and you can even throw your cushions overboard and float on them. Closed cell foam is generally hard and not necessarily comfortable to sit or sleep on for any length of time. “Reticulated” foam is completely open cell. The idea is that water and air flow through so if the cushions get wet they’ll dry fast. The problem with this foam is that it is very soft and does not support most normal sized people. In other words, you tend to “bottom-out” with this type of foam and after a couple of years it stays flat! “Regular” polyurethane foam is generally the best choice for interior cushions since you are looking for comfort, and the bonus is it is less expensive. Hopefully, rain and seawater are not a problem down below as the disadvantage with this type of foam is that it tends to soak up water and hold on to it.

As far as “hardness” goes, the foam’s “compression” is the number of pounds it take to compress one square foot of foam 1”. For seats, 50 lb foam will support an adult’s weight well. Comfort-wise, 60 lb maybe too hard. For backs, you want softer foam that you can sink in to as it does not have to support your whole weight. For berths, if you like a firm mattress, 50 lb is probably as high as you want to go.

4” thickness foam is pretty much standard for the salon. For sleeping, generally, the thicker the better. In a V-berth, because of the shape of the hull, the higher you go, the more room you’ll have side to side, but then you have to consider the head room too. Usually 6” foam makes a nice bed. Keep in mind that too-thick foam in a small space can tend to “fill-up” a boat and make the boat seem smaller.

I recommend that you stay away from untreated cotton fabrics for cushion covers unless you can control the temperature and humidity in your boat the way you do in your home. Mildew likes to eat cotton, so try to stick with a synthetic fabric. Sunbrella Furniture Fabric is perfect for boat interiors. It’s 100% acrylic and available in lots of colors and patterns. Also check regular upholstery fabrics. “Natural” fabrics are very popular these days, but try to keep the cotton content to a minimum. If condensation is a problem, you might consider using a vinyl fabric on the cushion bottoms.

A few comments for anyone considering re-covering old foam: 1.) Foam absorbs all the odors in the boat (holding tank, diesel, gasoline) so your nice new covers will soon smell like your nasty old foam. 2.) You may think your foam is still good until you sit on some new foam. The difference will surprise you. 3.) Foam shrinks over time, so unless you add new foam to your old foam, your “new” cushions will end up smaller than the space they’re supposed to fit in.

Good luck!

Jean Sheldon

Jean Sheldon
02-17-2001, 07:42 PM
There are 3 basic types of foam suitable for boats. Closed cell foam has the advantage of not absorbing any water. It makes great cockpit cushions, and you can even throw your cushions overboard and float on them. Closed cell foam is generally hard and not necessarily comfortable to sit or sleep on for any length of time. “Reticulated” foam is completely open cell. The idea is that water and air flow through so if the cushions get wet they’ll dry fast. The problem with this foam is that it is very soft and does not support most normal sized people. In other words, you tend to “bottom-out” with this type of foam and after a couple of years it stays flat! “Regular” polyurethane foam is generally the best choice for interior cushions since you are looking for comfort, and the bonus is it is less expensive. Hopefully, rain and seawater are not a problem down below as the disadvantage with this type of foam is that it tends to soak up water and hold on to it.

As far as “hardness” goes, the foam’s “compression” is the number of pounds it take to compress one square foot of foam 1”. For seats, 50 lb foam will support an adult’s weight well. Comfort-wise, 60 lb maybe too hard. For backs, you want softer foam that you can sink in to as it does not have to support your whole weight. For berths, if you like a firm mattress, 50 lb is probably as high as you want to go.

4” thickness foam is pretty much standard for the salon. For sleeping, generally, the thicker the better. In a V-berth, because of the shape of the hull, the higher you go, the more room you’ll have side to side, but then you have to consider the head room too. Usually 6” foam makes a nice bed. Keep in mind that too-thick foam in a small space can tend to “fill-up” a boat and make the boat seem smaller.

I recommend that you stay away from untreated cotton fabrics for cushion covers unless you can control the temperature and humidity in your boat the way you do in your home. Mildew likes to eat cotton, so try to stick with a synthetic fabric. Sunbrella Furniture Fabric is perfect for boat interiors. It’s 100% acrylic and available in lots of colors and patterns. Also check regular upholstery fabrics. “Natural” fabrics are very popular these days, but try to keep the cotton content to a minimum. If condensation is a problem, you might consider using a vinyl fabric on the cushion bottoms.

A few comments for anyone considering re-covering old foam: 1.) Foam absorbs all the odors in the boat (holding tank, diesel, gasoline) so your nice new covers will soon smell like your nasty old foam. 2.) You may think your foam is still good until you sit on some new foam. The difference will surprise you. 3.) Foam shrinks over time, so unless you add new foam to your old foam, your “new” cushions will end up smaller than the space they’re supposed to fit in.

Good luck!

Jean Sheldon

landlocked sailor
02-17-2001, 09:33 PM
Thanks Jean, an excellent summation and good advice. Rick

landlocked sailor
02-17-2001, 09:33 PM
Thanks Jean, an excellent summation and good advice. Rick

landlocked sailor
02-17-2001, 09:33 PM
Thanks Jean, an excellent summation and good advice. Rick

noquiklos
02-18-2001, 12:21 AM
Welcome, Jean. Perhaps you can answer a question for me. Assuming 5 or 6" cushions, is it possible to use a core of closed cell with a layer of "regular" polyurethane? I like odd lots of floatation throughout the boat.
Roy

noquiklos
02-18-2001, 12:21 AM
Welcome, Jean. Perhaps you can answer a question for me. Assuming 5 or 6" cushions, is it possible to use a core of closed cell with a layer of "regular" polyurethane? I like odd lots of floatation throughout the boat.
Roy

noquiklos
02-18-2001, 12:21 AM
Welcome, Jean. Perhaps you can answer a question for me. Assuming 5 or 6" cushions, is it possible to use a core of closed cell with a layer of "regular" polyurethane? I like odd lots of floatation throughout the boat.
Roy

NormMessinger
02-18-2001, 09:20 AM
You've been most helpful, Jean. Thank you.

--Norm

NormMessinger
02-18-2001, 09:20 AM
You've been most helpful, Jean. Thank you.

--Norm

NormMessinger
02-18-2001, 09:20 AM
You've been most helpful, Jean. Thank you.

--Norm

Ross Faneuf
02-19-2001, 06:21 PM
Jean - thank your for your reply. This is exactly the kind of information I was hoping for.

Ross Faneuf
02-19-2001, 06:21 PM
Jean - thank your for your reply. This is exactly the kind of information I was hoping for.

Ross Faneuf
02-19-2001, 06:21 PM
Jean - thank your for your reply. This is exactly the kind of information I was hoping for.

paladin
02-19-2001, 07:15 PM
Thats the reason I said "treated" cotton duck. Tana Mari's cusions/mattresses have been aboard for 4 years with no mildew and are removed and washed/cleaned regularly and retreated. We also use oil heat and cooking and the boat is really dry.

paladin
02-19-2001, 07:15 PM
Thats the reason I said "treated" cotton duck. Tana Mari's cusions/mattresses have been aboard for 4 years with no mildew and are removed and washed/cleaned regularly and retreated. We also use oil heat and cooking and the boat is really dry.

paladin
02-19-2001, 07:15 PM
Thats the reason I said "treated" cotton duck. Tana Mari's cusions/mattresses have been aboard for 4 years with no mildew and are removed and washed/cleaned regularly and retreated. We also use oil heat and cooking and the boat is really dry.