PDA

View Full Version : clear spray laquer wanted



mike hanyi
11-24-2000, 02:18 AM
Many years(4) ago when I was a young lad(29)I was an invited guest(pier jumping) on a big classic Herreshoff yacht(built in 1915)that was/is in France.(at least it has wood masts?!)
I once commented on the amount of polished bronze that the crew must maintain(me). One crewmember stated that we polish about once every 4 months and than spray clear laquer over the stuff(spray can)it seemed like an excelent idea as it comes right off with some polish and is much thiner and clearer then enamel,now that I own my own large(16 ft.) classic Herreshoff yacht (Dingy)i would love that my crew (wife)doesnt have to spend so much time laboring on my bronze(wont do it anyway),at the moment I have a subcontractor doing it for me (son)at an outragious fee (1 dollar a fitting).does anybody know where i can get this stuff as almost nobody seems to sell the stuff anymore.
Mike Hanyi
D.I.Y.Y.C.

mike hanyi
11-24-2000, 02:18 AM
Many years(4) ago when I was a young lad(29)I was an invited guest(pier jumping) on a big classic Herreshoff yacht(built in 1915)that was/is in France.(at least it has wood masts?!)
I once commented on the amount of polished bronze that the crew must maintain(me). One crewmember stated that we polish about once every 4 months and than spray clear laquer over the stuff(spray can)it seemed like an excelent idea as it comes right off with some polish and is much thiner and clearer then enamel,now that I own my own large(16 ft.) classic Herreshoff yacht (Dingy)i would love that my crew (wife)doesnt have to spend so much time laboring on my bronze(wont do it anyway),at the moment I have a subcontractor doing it for me (son)at an outragious fee (1 dollar a fitting).does anybody know where i can get this stuff as almost nobody seems to sell the stuff anymore.
Mike Hanyi
D.I.Y.Y.C.

mike hanyi
11-24-2000, 02:18 AM
Many years(4) ago when I was a young lad(29)I was an invited guest(pier jumping) on a big classic Herreshoff yacht(built in 1915)that was/is in France.(at least it has wood masts?!)
I once commented on the amount of polished bronze that the crew must maintain(me). One crewmember stated that we polish about once every 4 months and than spray clear laquer over the stuff(spray can)it seemed like an excelent idea as it comes right off with some polish and is much thiner and clearer then enamel,now that I own my own large(16 ft.) classic Herreshoff yacht (Dingy)i would love that my crew (wife)doesnt have to spend so much time laboring on my bronze(wont do it anyway),at the moment I have a subcontractor doing it for me (son)at an outragious fee (1 dollar a fitting).does anybody know where i can get this stuff as almost nobody seems to sell the stuff anymore.
Mike Hanyi
D.I.Y.Y.C.

thechemist
11-24-2000, 11:12 AM
I see from your profile that you are in Finland. In the U. S. I would direct you to any neighborhood hardware and paint store, to buy a can of Krylon clear spray lacquer. There, I don't know for sure. Artists use such things for some work, so you might try a supply store for graphic artists and draftspersons...the name for people who make drawings the old fashioned way...with pencil, straightedge, etc. Good luck.

thechemist
11-24-2000, 11:12 AM
I see from your profile that you are in Finland. In the U. S. I would direct you to any neighborhood hardware and paint store, to buy a can of Krylon clear spray lacquer. There, I don't know for sure. Artists use such things for some work, so you might try a supply store for graphic artists and draftspersons...the name for people who make drawings the old fashioned way...with pencil, straightedge, etc. Good luck.

thechemist
11-24-2000, 11:12 AM
I see from your profile that you are in Finland. In the U. S. I would direct you to any neighborhood hardware and paint store, to buy a can of Krylon clear spray lacquer. There, I don't know for sure. Artists use such things for some work, so you might try a supply store for graphic artists and draftspersons...the name for people who make drawings the old fashioned way...with pencil, straightedge, etc. Good luck.

Bob Cleek
11-24-2000, 05:05 PM
In the day of iron men and wooden ships, when rich guys owned both the yacht and the souls of her paid crew, some maniacs apparently insisted on polished bronze fittings. I suppose the fellows you met used lacquer out of a sense of self-preservation more than anything else. Undertaking to keep anything more than a bell or a clock or barometer housing polished aboard a salt water boat is masochistic to the max.

The problem with lacquer, or any coating on polished metal, in the marine environment, is that microscopic breaches in the coating permit tarnishing under the coating. The stuff often looks like it's got a bad case of caposi's sarcoma and you end up having to strip off all the lacquer and do it again. On balance, if you must, a light wipe every other day, or daily if sailing and salty, with some Nev-R-Dull should keep it looking bright. Beyond that, don't make yourself crazy. Nicely patinated bronze fittings are perfectly proper.

Bob Cleek
11-24-2000, 05:05 PM
In the day of iron men and wooden ships, when rich guys owned both the yacht and the souls of her paid crew, some maniacs apparently insisted on polished bronze fittings. I suppose the fellows you met used lacquer out of a sense of self-preservation more than anything else. Undertaking to keep anything more than a bell or a clock or barometer housing polished aboard a salt water boat is masochistic to the max.

The problem with lacquer, or any coating on polished metal, in the marine environment, is that microscopic breaches in the coating permit tarnishing under the coating. The stuff often looks like it's got a bad case of caposi's sarcoma and you end up having to strip off all the lacquer and do it again. On balance, if you must, a light wipe every other day, or daily if sailing and salty, with some Nev-R-Dull should keep it looking bright. Beyond that, don't make yourself crazy. Nicely patinated bronze fittings are perfectly proper.

Bob Cleek
11-24-2000, 05:05 PM
In the day of iron men and wooden ships, when rich guys owned both the yacht and the souls of her paid crew, some maniacs apparently insisted on polished bronze fittings. I suppose the fellows you met used lacquer out of a sense of self-preservation more than anything else. Undertaking to keep anything more than a bell or a clock or barometer housing polished aboard a salt water boat is masochistic to the max.

The problem with lacquer, or any coating on polished metal, in the marine environment, is that microscopic breaches in the coating permit tarnishing under the coating. The stuff often looks like it's got a bad case of caposi's sarcoma and you end up having to strip off all the lacquer and do it again. On balance, if you must, a light wipe every other day, or daily if sailing and salty, with some Nev-R-Dull should keep it looking bright. Beyond that, don't make yourself crazy. Nicely patinated bronze fittings are perfectly proper.

mike hanyi
11-25-2000, 03:03 AM
the baltic is very fresh and the problem
is that I trailersail after work,and bring it back home in time for dinner,I have I think about 14 REINECK blocks and love the shine on them(love to show off them too) but If I have to polish every week it becomes burdensome.
mph

mike hanyi
11-25-2000, 03:03 AM
the baltic is very fresh and the problem
is that I trailersail after work,and bring it back home in time for dinner,I have I think about 14 REINECK blocks and love the shine on them(love to show off them too) but If I have to polish every week it becomes burdensome.
mph

mike hanyi
11-25-2000, 03:03 AM
the baltic is very fresh and the problem
is that I trailersail after work,and bring it back home in time for dinner,I have I think about 14 REINECK blocks and love the shine on them(love to show off them too) but If I have to polish every week it becomes burdensome.
mph

Don Z.
11-25-2000, 01:29 PM
Not as long lasting as the lacquer you spoke of, but still efficient, especially in your climate is your favorite car wax. After polishing, apply a couple of coats of your favorite wax. We used to do this all the time with the brass we had to polish while I was at Infantry Training School. It works, and will not lead to the spotting that Bob spoke of...

Don Z.
11-25-2000, 01:29 PM
Not as long lasting as the lacquer you spoke of, but still efficient, especially in your climate is your favorite car wax. After polishing, apply a couple of coats of your favorite wax. We used to do this all the time with the brass we had to polish while I was at Infantry Training School. It works, and will not lead to the spotting that Bob spoke of...

Don Z.
11-25-2000, 01:29 PM
Not as long lasting as the lacquer you spoke of, but still efficient, especially in your climate is your favorite car wax. After polishing, apply a couple of coats of your favorite wax. We used to do this all the time with the brass we had to polish while I was at Infantry Training School. It works, and will not lead to the spotting that Bob spoke of...

thechemist
11-25-2000, 02:34 PM
Hey, Don, that's a much better solution than the lacquer. Wish I'd thought of it......

thechemist
11-25-2000, 02:34 PM
Hey, Don, that's a much better solution than the lacquer. Wish I'd thought of it......

thechemist
11-25-2000, 02:34 PM
Hey, Don, that's a much better solution than the lacquer. Wish I'd thought of it......

Gary Bergman
12-03-2000, 09:57 PM
Aw geez! What's wrong with green? Here I go worrying about things like patina, and now you guys wanna polish and laquerize? Go figure, but I'll stick to green, ya kin trust it to come back regularly.

Gary Bergman
12-03-2000, 09:57 PM
Aw geez! What's wrong with green? Here I go worrying about things like patina, and now you guys wanna polish and laquerize? Go figure, but I'll stick to green, ya kin trust it to come back regularly.

Gary Bergman
12-03-2000, 09:57 PM
Aw geez! What's wrong with green? Here I go worrying about things like patina, and now you guys wanna polish and laquerize? Go figure, but I'll stick to green, ya kin trust it to come back regularly.

paladin
12-20-2000, 02:56 PM
well darn,
If you can't find the lacquer at the local art store (in your area there is a product called "Artline" that I found when I played games with NATO) then go to the local automotive paint store. You can buy cans there that you put in a cup of your favorite stuff and then pressurize the can with CO2 from the same store. And then there is the little blue box with a neat cloth called "Brasso" that has been around for a million and a half years. If it works on military brass it should work on your blocks.

paladin
12-20-2000, 02:56 PM
well darn,
If you can't find the lacquer at the local art store (in your area there is a product called "Artline" that I found when I played games with NATO) then go to the local automotive paint store. You can buy cans there that you put in a cup of your favorite stuff and then pressurize the can with CO2 from the same store. And then there is the little blue box with a neat cloth called "Brasso" that has been around for a million and a half years. If it works on military brass it should work on your blocks.

paladin
12-20-2000, 02:56 PM
well darn,
If you can't find the lacquer at the local art store (in your area there is a product called "Artline" that I found when I played games with NATO) then go to the local automotive paint store. You can buy cans there that you put in a cup of your favorite stuff and then pressurize the can with CO2 from the same store. And then there is the little blue box with a neat cloth called "Brasso" that has been around for a million and a half years. If it works on military brass it should work on your blocks.