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jgjones
06-24-2014, 01:56 PM
I'm planning the addition of a bow net of about 1/2" 3-strand (not a fishing net type), and am in doubt about which material to use: nylon, Dacron or maybe spunfex (aka roblon). I already have some of the latter, but it seems a bit stiff to be making small clove hitches around the bowsprit stays. Could be it doesn't matter too much one way or the other, but I thought I'd ask for any opinions on which might be the better choice.

Thanks for any advice.

Jay Greer
06-24-2014, 02:32 PM
Three strand dacron or the synthetic manila line will work fine. You might consider making eye splices that can be seized on to the whisker stays with marlin. This will allow your martingale net to be easily removed. It can be painted black, if you wish, this will increase it's longevity. Artists black acrylic paint will last a very long time. This is water based but, once set, it is bullit proof.
Jay

jgjones
06-24-2014, 05:10 PM
I was wondering about the reason for seizing the splices to the stays, as I noticed in a close up photo of Taleisin's bow net. Now I know why. :) And I'll try the black paint. Thanks!
-Jim

Jay Greer
06-25-2014, 01:12 PM
Jim,
Larry adds servings only to the area that the seizings will attach to. I usually serve the entire whisker stay as it affords better footing anywhere along its length. Here you have two choices, seine twine or marlin. Seine twine is synthetic and can be purchased in a variety of diameters from fishing co-op suppliers and is black in color. I like marlin as painting it soaks in and seals the surface of the serving. Incidently I recommend parceling the wire prior to serving it. Rigging tape torn in narrow strips will suffice and gives further sealing and a bit of bulk to the wire. Another option is to use traditional cotton strips that are soaked in pine tar and bee's wax which can be a bit messy to work with. You will need a serving mallet for this job.
Jay

jgjones
06-25-2014, 02:22 PM
Luckily for me, the stays are all already parceled and served. But if they weren't, I'd definitely do so... as you say, much better footing. Being out there is precarious enough without standing on a bare slippery wire.
I'm hoping the net will allow me to adopt a bit more secure working position for changing sails.
-Jim

SchoonerRat
06-25-2014, 03:53 PM
The widow's net can also be the most comfy bunk on the boat, and a good spot to serve an anchor watch.

jgjones
06-25-2014, 11:19 PM
What about those jumping sharks I keep hearing about? Could be painful.

SchoonerRat
06-26-2014, 12:03 AM
Sharks have lousy eye sight. Keep your beer and wine from slopping over and you're good to go.

jgjones
09-24-2015, 10:20 PM
Bow net, jib net, martingale net, widow's net... gotta love boat terminology. :)

Anyway, finally (has it really been over a year?) finished up a net. I might call this a Mark I net, followed someday by a improved Mark II. I used the Spunflex that I had on hand, and it I think it would work and look better with a less stiff, heavier line. But it was fun to splice up, paint (acrylic) and seize on.
Jim

https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/?ui=2&ik=d6e5ab09e8&view=fimg&th=1500279a6801d81c&attid=0.2&disp=emb&realattid=ii_iez2jkof0_15002793d2b2d2c5&attbid=ANGjdJ_wZXD0wJO5ms6U8sGaCzvx32YhHgznit0XDqk FjIj8wweVtMLjHvgiN5p6rc50nOcBjK7UklDr3nfVETht55k2H 48V9IHmfoRhYCR4YdxLSP2-G4GQ2WJVtlE&sz=w1088-h698&ats=1443150540380&rm=1500279a6801d81c&zw&atsh=1

https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/?ui=2&ik=d6e5ab09e8&view=fimg&th=1500279a6801d81c&attid=0.1&disp=emb&realattid=ii_iez2jkoq1_15002793d2b2d2c5&attbid=ANGjdJ9Y9JOTo6gSnlhePGbIxWnh-O3w_goQiSX9Xc0tu1q7Am2VJjwSEhO2yTW749kQ2MrJDUqcfQG fafqyrA15_y4QvfxPv5fCALDA2nsSIDqn3Jnn9nbftdFHXZw&sz=w1088-h728&ats=1443150540380&rm=1500279a6801d81c&zw&atsh=1

Jim Oppy
09-24-2015, 11:21 PM
Me no see um pics.

I love sailing terminology. As with any profession, sailing develops its own language, usually meant to aid in communication but often doing the opposite. There are some really priceless bits of dialogue in the Patrick O'Brian novels on point.

jgjones
09-25-2015, 01:35 AM
I'll try the PhotoBucket method:

http://i946.photobucket.com/albums/ad307/jgj254/BowNet_A_small_zpsorhbcwou.jpg (http://s946.photobucket.com/user/jgj254/media/BowNet_A_small_zpsorhbcwou.jpg.html)

http://i946.photobucket.com/albums/ad307/jgj254/BowNet_B_small_zpspxxohew8.jpg (http://s946.photobucket.com/user/jgj254/media/BowNet_B_small_zpspxxohew8.jpg.html)

Jay Greer
09-25-2015, 10:58 AM
Here is the one I did for my Common Sense Class sloop "Red Witch" What not apparent here is that there is a set of hinged bronze spreaders just aft of the conjunction of the sprit and the sheer strake. These give a better angle of support for the whisker stays and spread the martingale a bit wider than if they were omitted. There is also a net made of heavy seine twine that goes up to the life line. The whole works creats a basket for headsails that are dropped from the slotted headstay. It is also a great place to kick back and take a break.
Jay
https://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47b8ce23b3127ccec510497d79b400000040O00QYsmrNy5bsQ e3nwg/cC/f%3D0/ls%3D00107990352120081002232335222.JPG/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D720/ry%3D480/

Jim Oppy
09-25-2015, 12:46 PM
Thank you. Looks great!

lupussonic
09-25-2015, 03:01 PM
I'll try the PhotoBucket method:

http://i946.photobucket.com/albums/ad307/jgj254/BowNet_A_small_zpsorhbcwou.jpg (http://s946.photobucket.com/user/jgj254/media/BowNet_A_small_zpsorhbcwou.jpg.html)



Im not familiar with your type of boat, but is that kind of bow net /whisker stay arrangement normal? I've never seen an arrangement like that going up to the stanchions.

jgjones
09-25-2015, 03:52 PM
I dunno... what's normal? :) I basically copied other nets I've seen on boats with bowsprits, or read about. It would probably work nearly as well without the segments from the bowsprit shrouds / whisker stays up to the lifelines, unless I make a habit of lowering the jib on a beam reach.

The boat is a Lyle Hess 32, generally patterned after, as I understand, Falmouth cutters.

This article, http://yachtpals.com/seasickness-prevention-9193, has a photo about half-way down of a similar net.

Jim