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Steven R
07-14-2003, 11:13 PM
I'm looking for a trailerable boat cover for this 15' Skerry. I can't find anything for a double-ender. Any thoughts would be appreciated.

http://www.bigdunesystems.com/get-outside/skerry/sk103.jpg

-Steven

Steven R
07-14-2003, 11:13 PM
I'm looking for a trailerable boat cover for this 15' Skerry. I can't find anything for a double-ender. Any thoughts would be appreciated.

http://www.bigdunesystems.com/get-outside/skerry/sk103.jpg

-Steven

Steven R
07-14-2003, 11:13 PM
I'm looking for a trailerable boat cover for this 15' Skerry. I can't find anything for a double-ender. Any thoughts would be appreciated.

http://www.bigdunesystems.com/get-outside/skerry/sk103.jpg

-Steven

gert
07-15-2003, 09:13 AM
I had one made for my shearwater (16'double ender)by a local upholstry shop that happened to have some Sunbrella left over from a previous job. First I bought some realy cheap fabric and made a full size template of the cover using hotmelt glue at the seams and simply trimming the "hem" This worked very well, I did all the grommets my self and the whole thing cost $300 Ca. If you do this don't allow for stretch cause Sunbrella doesn't. We welded little hooks onto the trailer every 14" and used a continuous shock cord laced thru the cover grommets. This holds the boat down also and we actualy only strap her down when she's going on a long road trip.

gert
07-15-2003, 09:13 AM
I had one made for my shearwater (16'double ender)by a local upholstry shop that happened to have some Sunbrella left over from a previous job. First I bought some realy cheap fabric and made a full size template of the cover using hotmelt glue at the seams and simply trimming the "hem" This worked very well, I did all the grommets my self and the whole thing cost $300 Ca. If you do this don't allow for stretch cause Sunbrella doesn't. We welded little hooks onto the trailer every 14" and used a continuous shock cord laced thru the cover grommets. This holds the boat down also and we actualy only strap her down when she's going on a long road trip.

gert
07-15-2003, 09:13 AM
I had one made for my shearwater (16'double ender)by a local upholstry shop that happened to have some Sunbrella left over from a previous job. First I bought some realy cheap fabric and made a full size template of the cover using hotmelt glue at the seams and simply trimming the "hem" This worked very well, I did all the grommets my self and the whole thing cost $300 Ca. If you do this don't allow for stretch cause Sunbrella doesn't. We welded little hooks onto the trailer every 14" and used a continuous shock cord laced thru the cover grommets. This holds the boat down also and we actualy only strap her down when she's going on a long road trip.

ccmanuals
07-15-2003, 09:15 AM
You've got to be real carefull with a boat cover on a varnished wooden boat. When trailering air movement of the cover can wear or rub the varnish off of her.

ccmanuals
07-15-2003, 09:15 AM
You've got to be real carefull with a boat cover on a varnished wooden boat. When trailering air movement of the cover can wear or rub the varnish off of her.

ccmanuals
07-15-2003, 09:15 AM
You've got to be real carefull with a boat cover on a varnished wooden boat. When trailering air movement of the cover can wear or rub the varnish off of her.

Brook Hamilton
07-15-2003, 03:41 PM
Trailering covers can be tough to get right.

Personally, I would shy away from Sunbrella as it frays too easily and does not like flogging in the wind at all. 60 or 70 mph on the highway is a LOT of wind compared to what Sunbrella would receive as a mooring cover, for which it is a fantastic choice.

There are plenty of modern fabrics that are probably good, but I have used good old fashioned cotton duck. I don't remember the weight but it was a greenish colour and it was not hard on bright finishes. It more or less repelled water as well, but you didn't want to pack it away wet. However, even with careful tailoring, after a long trip (Vancouver BC to Montreal QC and back) the cover was back at the sailmakers getting fitted with extra reinforcements, leather rub patches, etc... all of which was included in the original price. Sometimes you don't know where all the wear points will be until you really use the thing.

If you are going for short trips at 20 mph and you live 5 mins from the boat ramp, maybe it would be a different story.

Brook Hamilton
07-15-2003, 03:41 PM
Trailering covers can be tough to get right.

Personally, I would shy away from Sunbrella as it frays too easily and does not like flogging in the wind at all. 60 or 70 mph on the highway is a LOT of wind compared to what Sunbrella would receive as a mooring cover, for which it is a fantastic choice.

There are plenty of modern fabrics that are probably good, but I have used good old fashioned cotton duck. I don't remember the weight but it was a greenish colour and it was not hard on bright finishes. It more or less repelled water as well, but you didn't want to pack it away wet. However, even with careful tailoring, after a long trip (Vancouver BC to Montreal QC and back) the cover was back at the sailmakers getting fitted with extra reinforcements, leather rub patches, etc... all of which was included in the original price. Sometimes you don't know where all the wear points will be until you really use the thing.

If you are going for short trips at 20 mph and you live 5 mins from the boat ramp, maybe it would be a different story.

Brook Hamilton
07-15-2003, 03:41 PM
Trailering covers can be tough to get right.

Personally, I would shy away from Sunbrella as it frays too easily and does not like flogging in the wind at all. 60 or 70 mph on the highway is a LOT of wind compared to what Sunbrella would receive as a mooring cover, for which it is a fantastic choice.

There are plenty of modern fabrics that are probably good, but I have used good old fashioned cotton duck. I don't remember the weight but it was a greenish colour and it was not hard on bright finishes. It more or less repelled water as well, but you didn't want to pack it away wet. However, even with careful tailoring, after a long trip (Vancouver BC to Montreal QC and back) the cover was back at the sailmakers getting fitted with extra reinforcements, leather rub patches, etc... all of which was included in the original price. Sometimes you don't know where all the wear points will be until you really use the thing.

If you are going for short trips at 20 mph and you live 5 mins from the boat ramp, maybe it would be a different story.

gert
07-15-2003, 04:52 PM
the reason for the template (fit) and grommets 14" oc with shock cord is to prevent flapping. The edge where the grommts go is three layers thick and quadruple stitched. My cover only has 1800 freeway miles on it so far and has not frayed in the least; maybie it was well made? Sunbrella repels water yet breaths; this is not the boats winter cover but it does very well for the seasons it's in use, so far.

gert
07-15-2003, 04:52 PM
the reason for the template (fit) and grommets 14" oc with shock cord is to prevent flapping. The edge where the grommts go is three layers thick and quadruple stitched. My cover only has 1800 freeway miles on it so far and has not frayed in the least; maybie it was well made? Sunbrella repels water yet breaths; this is not the boats winter cover but it does very well for the seasons it's in use, so far.

gert
07-15-2003, 04:52 PM
the reason for the template (fit) and grommets 14" oc with shock cord is to prevent flapping. The edge where the grommts go is three layers thick and quadruple stitched. My cover only has 1800 freeway miles on it so far and has not frayed in the least; maybie it was well made? Sunbrella repels water yet breaths; this is not the boats winter cover but it does very well for the seasons it's in use, so far.

NormMessinger
07-15-2003, 07:13 PM
A friend had a cover made for his boat by an outfit that provides covers for semi trucks. It is a moderatly heavy rubberized fabric of some sort.

NormMessinger
07-15-2003, 07:13 PM
A friend had a cover made for his boat by an outfit that provides covers for semi trucks. It is a moderatly heavy rubberized fabric of some sort.

NormMessinger
07-15-2003, 07:13 PM
A friend had a cover made for his boat by an outfit that provides covers for semi trucks. It is a moderatly heavy rubberized fabric of some sort.

Nicholas Carey
07-15-2003, 07:35 PM
Go for a tailor made sunbrella cover, but get it from a good canvas shop that understands how it's going to be used.

Aside from anything else, it will:

(1) protect that fancy varnish job from the Sun. UV kills.

(2) keep the boat clean. The amount of filth that drops out of the air is truly amazing. The Center for Wooden Boats is right by I-5. It's just amazing how fast and how dirty things get. Ah, the joys of urban boating.

Another alternative might be a product called Sunforger, a preshrunk 10 oz. 100% cotton boat canvas treated to be water-, mildew-, mold- and algae-resistant.

The rubberized truck tarp will last a long time, but it's likely to be just as hard on the finish, AND it won't 'breath'. Any water that gets in the boat will just sit their and ferment.

Get a light color fabric, whatever you do. It heats up less in the sun. I suggest a grey or brown tone—Sunbrella has some nice 'tweed' patterns that are good. They'll show dirt less—as as the cover will, like a pair of sneakers, devolve toward grey from the road filth.

Nicholas Carey
07-15-2003, 07:35 PM
Go for a tailor made sunbrella cover, but get it from a good canvas shop that understands how it's going to be used.

Aside from anything else, it will:

(1) protect that fancy varnish job from the Sun. UV kills.

(2) keep the boat clean. The amount of filth that drops out of the air is truly amazing. The Center for Wooden Boats is right by I-5. It's just amazing how fast and how dirty things get. Ah, the joys of urban boating.

Another alternative might be a product called Sunforger, a preshrunk 10 oz. 100% cotton boat canvas treated to be water-, mildew-, mold- and algae-resistant.

The rubberized truck tarp will last a long time, but it's likely to be just as hard on the finish, AND it won't 'breath'. Any water that gets in the boat will just sit their and ferment.

Get a light color fabric, whatever you do. It heats up less in the sun. I suggest a grey or brown tone—Sunbrella has some nice 'tweed' patterns that are good. They'll show dirt less—as as the cover will, like a pair of sneakers, devolve toward grey from the road filth.

Nicholas Carey
07-15-2003, 07:35 PM
Go for a tailor made sunbrella cover, but get it from a good canvas shop that understands how it's going to be used.

Aside from anything else, it will:

(1) protect that fancy varnish job from the Sun. UV kills.

(2) keep the boat clean. The amount of filth that drops out of the air is truly amazing. The Center for Wooden Boats is right by I-5. It's just amazing how fast and how dirty things get. Ah, the joys of urban boating.

Another alternative might be a product called Sunforger, a preshrunk 10 oz. 100% cotton boat canvas treated to be water-, mildew-, mold- and algae-resistant.

The rubberized truck tarp will last a long time, but it's likely to be just as hard on the finish, AND it won't 'breath'. Any water that gets in the boat will just sit their and ferment.

Get a light color fabric, whatever you do. It heats up less in the sun. I suggest a grey or brown tone—Sunbrella has some nice 'tweed' patterns that are good. They'll show dirt less—as as the cover will, like a pair of sneakers, devolve toward grey from the road filth.

Todd Bradshaw
07-16-2003, 02:36 AM
Great looking boat! It deserves a good cover made by a pro. Sunbrella is the material of choice. Properly made and reinforced it won't flap and won't fray at all. Sunforger (or any other cotton canvas - pre-shrunk or not) will still change shape in time, usually by shrinking. You will probably need a couple bows or upright "tent poles" to get a decent roof shape to shed water and keep things tight. A 12" square piece of plywood with a pole sticking out of it which nests up top in a reinforced spot or which has a pin in it's end which goes through a grommet in the cover makes a pretty good tent pole.

Having been in the cover business, I would suggest pre-rigging your trailer with a whole batch of good anchor points and then finding a cover maker who will keep the boat there while they build the cover. Making good boat covers is a matter of fitting, sewing, fitting again and making small modifications to get a good, tight, custom fit. It's much easier and the results are better if the builder can continually be working with the actual boat available and test-fit the cover any time he wants during the process.

Sunbrella needs to be backed-up where it crosses a sharp edge. I normally use Dacron sailcloth, which is both very abrasion resistant and pretty non-abrasive. Some builders use small patches of truck-tarp fabric, some use leather (which doesn't last very well out in the weather). It's certainly possible that even with a great cover, you may lose a little varnish in time from chafe. It basically comes with the package and can't be totally prevented, but it sure beats the damage that being out in the weather can do.

Todd Bradshaw
07-16-2003, 02:36 AM
Great looking boat! It deserves a good cover made by a pro. Sunbrella is the material of choice. Properly made and reinforced it won't flap and won't fray at all. Sunforger (or any other cotton canvas - pre-shrunk or not) will still change shape in time, usually by shrinking. You will probably need a couple bows or upright "tent poles" to get a decent roof shape to shed water and keep things tight. A 12" square piece of plywood with a pole sticking out of it which nests up top in a reinforced spot or which has a pin in it's end which goes through a grommet in the cover makes a pretty good tent pole.

Having been in the cover business, I would suggest pre-rigging your trailer with a whole batch of good anchor points and then finding a cover maker who will keep the boat there while they build the cover. Making good boat covers is a matter of fitting, sewing, fitting again and making small modifications to get a good, tight, custom fit. It's much easier and the results are better if the builder can continually be working with the actual boat available and test-fit the cover any time he wants during the process.

Sunbrella needs to be backed-up where it crosses a sharp edge. I normally use Dacron sailcloth, which is both very abrasion resistant and pretty non-abrasive. Some builders use small patches of truck-tarp fabric, some use leather (which doesn't last very well out in the weather). It's certainly possible that even with a great cover, you may lose a little varnish in time from chafe. It basically comes with the package and can't be totally prevented, but it sure beats the damage that being out in the weather can do.

Todd Bradshaw
07-16-2003, 02:36 AM
Great looking boat! It deserves a good cover made by a pro. Sunbrella is the material of choice. Properly made and reinforced it won't flap and won't fray at all. Sunforger (or any other cotton canvas - pre-shrunk or not) will still change shape in time, usually by shrinking. You will probably need a couple bows or upright "tent poles" to get a decent roof shape to shed water and keep things tight. A 12" square piece of plywood with a pole sticking out of it which nests up top in a reinforced spot or which has a pin in it's end which goes through a grommet in the cover makes a pretty good tent pole.

Having been in the cover business, I would suggest pre-rigging your trailer with a whole batch of good anchor points and then finding a cover maker who will keep the boat there while they build the cover. Making good boat covers is a matter of fitting, sewing, fitting again and making small modifications to get a good, tight, custom fit. It's much easier and the results are better if the builder can continually be working with the actual boat available and test-fit the cover any time he wants during the process.

Sunbrella needs to be backed-up where it crosses a sharp edge. I normally use Dacron sailcloth, which is both very abrasion resistant and pretty non-abrasive. Some builders use small patches of truck-tarp fabric, some use leather (which doesn't last very well out in the weather). It's certainly possible that even with a great cover, you may lose a little varnish in time from chafe. It basically comes with the package and can't be totally prevented, but it sure beats the damage that being out in the weather can do.

Steven R
07-16-2003, 04:34 AM
Thank you all for your advise. Very helpful.

-Steven

Steven R
07-16-2003, 04:34 AM
Thank you all for your advise. Very helpful.

-Steven

Steven R
07-16-2003, 04:34 AM
Thank you all for your advise. Very helpful.

-Steven