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Venchka
02-28-2004, 01:58 PM
Another wood question from the Lumber Challenged:

Quercus stellata (post oak) growing in northeast Texas. 10"-16" diameter at chest height x 8' to 12' long. The usual "random width and length" you see qouted by lumber yards. Air dried in my closed garage. I know, not ideal but I don't really have a choice since I'm only up there every two or three months. Shrinkage very similar to Quercus alba at 20% MC.

I told the band mill operator I wanted plain sawn, leave the bark on boards. She will cut the logs on the centerline and then cut the boards from each half. Very simple.

Here's the question: If I tell her to cut the boards 5/4 can I expect to get 4/4 boards after drying and planing? Should I go to 6/4 boards to be safe? I don't have a use yet. I just want the most boards with the most versatility for when I do decide what to do with them. I may even want to use them in a glue up to get 8/4 stock.

I expect to be able to get more logs in the future so I could have them sawn thicker, thinner, quarter sawn, etc. as my needs become clearer. For this first batch 5/4 plain sawn seemed reasonable.

Venchka
02-28-2004, 01:58 PM
Another wood question from the Lumber Challenged:

Quercus stellata (post oak) growing in northeast Texas. 10"-16" diameter at chest height x 8' to 12' long. The usual "random width and length" you see qouted by lumber yards. Air dried in my closed garage. I know, not ideal but I don't really have a choice since I'm only up there every two or three months. Shrinkage very similar to Quercus alba at 20% MC.

I told the band mill operator I wanted plain sawn, leave the bark on boards. She will cut the logs on the centerline and then cut the boards from each half. Very simple.

Here's the question: If I tell her to cut the boards 5/4 can I expect to get 4/4 boards after drying and planing? Should I go to 6/4 boards to be safe? I don't have a use yet. I just want the most boards with the most versatility for when I do decide what to do with them. I may even want to use them in a glue up to get 8/4 stock.

I expect to be able to get more logs in the future so I could have them sawn thicker, thinner, quarter sawn, etc. as my needs become clearer. For this first batch 5/4 plain sawn seemed reasonable.

Venchka
02-28-2004, 01:58 PM
Another wood question from the Lumber Challenged:

Quercus stellata (post oak) growing in northeast Texas. 10"-16" diameter at chest height x 8' to 12' long. The usual "random width and length" you see qouted by lumber yards. Air dried in my closed garage. I know, not ideal but I don't really have a choice since I'm only up there every two or three months. Shrinkage very similar to Quercus alba at 20% MC.

I told the band mill operator I wanted plain sawn, leave the bark on boards. She will cut the logs on the centerline and then cut the boards from each half. Very simple.

Here's the question: If I tell her to cut the boards 5/4 can I expect to get 4/4 boards after drying and planing? Should I go to 6/4 boards to be safe? I don't have a use yet. I just want the most boards with the most versatility for when I do decide what to do with them. I may even want to use them in a glue up to get 8/4 stock.

I expect to be able to get more logs in the future so I could have them sawn thicker, thinner, quarter sawn, etc. as my needs become clearer. For this first batch 5/4 plain sawn seemed reasonable.

Ken Hutchins
02-28-2004, 02:12 PM
If you cut the logs thru the centerline and then cut the boards from each half of the log, you will probably end up with severe edge curve in the boards due to stress in the log. Best to cut the boards all the full width of the log, taking some from the first side, flipping the log to the sawn face, then cutting the remainder, possibly needing to flip the log again during the process as any curl in the log developes during the cutting. Also as soon as they are cut, peel the bark off, any resident sritters will be in or just under the bark. As for thickness 5/4 seems good for general work.

Ken Hutchins
02-28-2004, 02:12 PM
If you cut the logs thru the centerline and then cut the boards from each half of the log, you will probably end up with severe edge curve in the boards due to stress in the log. Best to cut the boards all the full width of the log, taking some from the first side, flipping the log to the sawn face, then cutting the remainder, possibly needing to flip the log again during the process as any curl in the log developes during the cutting. Also as soon as they are cut, peel the bark off, any resident sritters will be in or just under the bark. As for thickness 5/4 seems good for general work.

Ken Hutchins
02-28-2004, 02:12 PM
If you cut the logs thru the centerline and then cut the boards from each half of the log, you will probably end up with severe edge curve in the boards due to stress in the log. Best to cut the boards all the full width of the log, taking some from the first side, flipping the log to the sawn face, then cutting the remainder, possibly needing to flip the log again during the process as any curl in the log developes during the cutting. Also as soon as they are cut, peel the bark off, any resident sritters will be in or just under the bark. As for thickness 5/4 seems good for general work.

Venchka
02-28-2004, 02:20 PM
Thanks, Ken. These are things I didn't know. I thought the bark stayed on to slow drying. I suppose I don't want critters having a free run of the garage.

Venchka
02-28-2004, 02:20 PM
Thanks, Ken. These are things I didn't know. I thought the bark stayed on to slow drying. I suppose I don't want critters having a free run of the garage.

Venchka
02-28-2004, 02:20 PM
Thanks, Ken. These are things I didn't know. I thought the bark stayed on to slow drying. I suppose I don't want critters having a free run of the garage.

Ron Williamson
02-28-2004, 06:10 PM
4/4,5/4,6/4 are rough lumber sawing dimensions.After planing 4/4,it is still 4/4(It's kinda wierd).If you want full 1" boards after drying and planing,5/4 is a good idea.
Some poorly sawed 6/4 that I've seen wouldn't plane to a clean 1".I've done a couple myself as a matter of fact :rolleyes: .
R

Ron Williamson
02-28-2004, 06:10 PM
4/4,5/4,6/4 are rough lumber sawing dimensions.After planing 4/4,it is still 4/4(It's kinda wierd).If you want full 1" boards after drying and planing,5/4 is a good idea.
Some poorly sawed 6/4 that I've seen wouldn't plane to a clean 1".I've done a couple myself as a matter of fact :rolleyes: .
R

Ron Williamson
02-28-2004, 06:10 PM
4/4,5/4,6/4 are rough lumber sawing dimensions.After planing 4/4,it is still 4/4(It's kinda wierd).If you want full 1" boards after drying and planing,5/4 is a good idea.
Some poorly sawed 6/4 that I've seen wouldn't plane to a clean 1".I've done a couple myself as a matter of fact :rolleyes: .
R

George Roberts
02-28-2004, 07:43 PM
Venchka ---

Tell the sawyer what you want to end up with after drying and planing. As others have said 4/4 should clean up at 13/16" (a bit pround of 3/4") or so.

I find 8/4 useful. I can resaw it and plane it to 2 book matched 13/16" pieces.

You should get 2-3" of quartersawn lumber in the middle of the log. (Those are small logs). I don't think it is worth while quartersawing something that small.

George Roberts
02-28-2004, 07:43 PM
Venchka ---

Tell the sawyer what you want to end up with after drying and planing. As others have said 4/4 should clean up at 13/16" (a bit pround of 3/4") or so.

I find 8/4 useful. I can resaw it and plane it to 2 book matched 13/16" pieces.

You should get 2-3" of quartersawn lumber in the middle of the log. (Those are small logs). I don't think it is worth while quartersawing something that small.

George Roberts
02-28-2004, 07:43 PM
Venchka ---

Tell the sawyer what you want to end up with after drying and planing. As others have said 4/4 should clean up at 13/16" (a bit pround of 3/4") or so.

I find 8/4 useful. I can resaw it and plane it to 2 book matched 13/16" pieces.

You should get 2-3" of quartersawn lumber in the middle of the log. (Those are small logs). I don't think it is worth while quartersawing something that small.

Bruce Hooke
02-29-2004, 11:10 AM
Does your garage turn into a 120 degree "furnace" in the summer, as many do? If so, then to put it bluntly you may end up producing a nice pile of firewood if you dry it in the garage. If the wood dries too quickly it will check all over the place. White Oaks in particular (which this is) like to dry slowly because the water cannot escape easily from it. Another option for drying it might be to stack it outside with some scrap plywood or similar material on top to keep the sun and rain off it. The early stages of the drying process are in many ways the most critical. If it dries too fast early on then it will check. If it dries too slowly then it may develop fungal stains and similar problems.

You don't really loose that much thickenss in the drying process (5-10%) so the key factor that determines what thickness wood you end up with is the quality of the sawmill and the sawyer.

Bruce Hooke
02-29-2004, 11:10 AM
Does your garage turn into a 120 degree "furnace" in the summer, as many do? If so, then to put it bluntly you may end up producing a nice pile of firewood if you dry it in the garage. If the wood dries too quickly it will check all over the place. White Oaks in particular (which this is) like to dry slowly because the water cannot escape easily from it. Another option for drying it might be to stack it outside with some scrap plywood or similar material on top to keep the sun and rain off it. The early stages of the drying process are in many ways the most critical. If it dries too fast early on then it will check. If it dries too slowly then it may develop fungal stains and similar problems.

You don't really loose that much thickenss in the drying process (5-10%) so the key factor that determines what thickness wood you end up with is the quality of the sawmill and the sawyer.

Bruce Hooke
02-29-2004, 11:10 AM
Does your garage turn into a 120 degree "furnace" in the summer, as many do? If so, then to put it bluntly you may end up producing a nice pile of firewood if you dry it in the garage. If the wood dries too quickly it will check all over the place. White Oaks in particular (which this is) like to dry slowly because the water cannot escape easily from it. Another option for drying it might be to stack it outside with some scrap plywood or similar material on top to keep the sun and rain off it. The early stages of the drying process are in many ways the most critical. If it dries too fast early on then it will check. If it dries too slowly then it may develop fungal stains and similar problems.

You don't really loose that much thickenss in the drying process (5-10%) so the key factor that determines what thickness wood you end up with is the quality of the sawmill and the sawyer.

Bruce Hooke
02-29-2004, 01:06 PM
Originally posted by George Roberts:
Venchka ---

Tell the sawyer what you want to end up with after drying and planing. As others have said 4/4 should clean up at 13/16" (a bit pround of 3/4") or so.

I find 8/4 useful. I can resaw it and plane it to 2 book matched 13/16" pieces.

You should get 2-3" of quartersawn lumber in the middle of the log. (Those are small logs). I don't think it is worth while quartersawing something that small.I like George's suggestion of going with 8/4. Thicker stock is often useful and as George noted you can slice it in half to get 3/4" stock if you want thinner stuff. It will take a good bit longer to dry but if you are going to cut more later then you might as well start with the stuff that will take longer to dry and then move to the thinner, quicker drying cuts later. Of course if you have plans in mind that would mostly call for 4/4 or 5/4 stock then there is less point in going much thicker than that.

Bruce Hooke
02-29-2004, 01:06 PM
Originally posted by George Roberts:
Venchka ---

Tell the sawyer what you want to end up with after drying and planing. As others have said 4/4 should clean up at 13/16" (a bit pround of 3/4") or so.

I find 8/4 useful. I can resaw it and plane it to 2 book matched 13/16" pieces.

You should get 2-3" of quartersawn lumber in the middle of the log. (Those are small logs). I don't think it is worth while quartersawing something that small.I like George's suggestion of going with 8/4. Thicker stock is often useful and as George noted you can slice it in half to get 3/4" stock if you want thinner stuff. It will take a good bit longer to dry but if you are going to cut more later then you might as well start with the stuff that will take longer to dry and then move to the thinner, quicker drying cuts later. Of course if you have plans in mind that would mostly call for 4/4 or 5/4 stock then there is less point in going much thicker than that.

Bruce Hooke
02-29-2004, 01:06 PM
Originally posted by George Roberts:
Venchka ---

Tell the sawyer what you want to end up with after drying and planing. As others have said 4/4 should clean up at 13/16" (a bit pround of 3/4") or so.

I find 8/4 useful. I can resaw it and plane it to 2 book matched 13/16" pieces.

You should get 2-3" of quartersawn lumber in the middle of the log. (Those are small logs). I don't think it is worth while quartersawing something that small.I like George's suggestion of going with 8/4. Thicker stock is often useful and as George noted you can slice it in half to get 3/4" stock if you want thinner stuff. It will take a good bit longer to dry but if you are going to cut more later then you might as well start with the stuff that will take longer to dry and then move to the thinner, quicker drying cuts later. Of course if you have plans in mind that would mostly call for 4/4 or 5/4 stock then there is less point in going much thicker than that.

Steve Redmond
02-29-2004, 03:17 PM
This is just my experience -- I have a 20'long by 28" sawmill outside and a 24" bandsaw in the shop.

If you are planning to resaw the dried stock it will definitely take a lot longer in every way.

1.)Drying takes longer
2.)resawing takes longer
3.)the wood really has to be be stabilized internally with uniform moisture before resawing, so add even more time.
4.)It may need stacking and drying afterward

If you get anxious and resaw too soon, the resawed halves will curl right off the blade, as the inside of the timber will be higher in moisture than the outside. More than likely you will run-out and taper the board, possibly ruining it for your purposes. Even a small moisture differential will curl things in a short time.

You might be able to get by re-stacking, and stickering the resawed stuff and waiting for it to take a straight set, and stabilize but that's even more time.

I don't find 2" boards versatile unless I actually need 2" boards. You can get "book matched" lumber off of 1" sawmill stock just as easily as off of resawed 2" stock if you're supplying the log -- adjacent faces are adjacent faces in either case and both have to be planed anyway.

Resawing a decent width of dry oak is slow work and requires a big bandsaw. Okay if you want to make a table, but not much fun for any quantity of lumber.

If you have need for both 1 and 2 inch stock, it's a lot easier to just specify both than to plan on resawing dry hardwood to get the thin stuff two plus years down the road. It would be an awful disappointment to cut it open after that time and have it curl.

Just an opinion -- perhaps others have done a better job of sawing and drying than I have. I'd be happy to learn a better way.

Best Regards,

--Steve
Steve Redmond
www.sredmond.com (http://www.sredmond.com)

Steve Redmond
02-29-2004, 03:17 PM
This is just my experience -- I have a 20'long by 28" sawmill outside and a 24" bandsaw in the shop.

If you are planning to resaw the dried stock it will definitely take a lot longer in every way.

1.)Drying takes longer
2.)resawing takes longer
3.)the wood really has to be be stabilized internally with uniform moisture before resawing, so add even more time.
4.)It may need stacking and drying afterward

If you get anxious and resaw too soon, the resawed halves will curl right off the blade, as the inside of the timber will be higher in moisture than the outside. More than likely you will run-out and taper the board, possibly ruining it for your purposes. Even a small moisture differential will curl things in a short time.

You might be able to get by re-stacking, and stickering the resawed stuff and waiting for it to take a straight set, and stabilize but that's even more time.

I don't find 2" boards versatile unless I actually need 2" boards. You can get "book matched" lumber off of 1" sawmill stock just as easily as off of resawed 2" stock if you're supplying the log -- adjacent faces are adjacent faces in either case and both have to be planed anyway.

Resawing a decent width of dry oak is slow work and requires a big bandsaw. Okay if you want to make a table, but not much fun for any quantity of lumber.

If you have need for both 1 and 2 inch stock, it's a lot easier to just specify both than to plan on resawing dry hardwood to get the thin stuff two plus years down the road. It would be an awful disappointment to cut it open after that time and have it curl.

Just an opinion -- perhaps others have done a better job of sawing and drying than I have. I'd be happy to learn a better way.

Best Regards,

--Steve
Steve Redmond
www.sredmond.com (http://www.sredmond.com)

Steve Redmond
02-29-2004, 03:17 PM
This is just my experience -- I have a 20'long by 28" sawmill outside and a 24" bandsaw in the shop.

If you are planning to resaw the dried stock it will definitely take a lot longer in every way.

1.)Drying takes longer
2.)resawing takes longer
3.)the wood really has to be be stabilized internally with uniform moisture before resawing, so add even more time.
4.)It may need stacking and drying afterward

If you get anxious and resaw too soon, the resawed halves will curl right off the blade, as the inside of the timber will be higher in moisture than the outside. More than likely you will run-out and taper the board, possibly ruining it for your purposes. Even a small moisture differential will curl things in a short time.

You might be able to get by re-stacking, and stickering the resawed stuff and waiting for it to take a straight set, and stabilize but that's even more time.

I don't find 2" boards versatile unless I actually need 2" boards. You can get "book matched" lumber off of 1" sawmill stock just as easily as off of resawed 2" stock if you're supplying the log -- adjacent faces are adjacent faces in either case and both have to be planed anyway.

Resawing a decent width of dry oak is slow work and requires a big bandsaw. Okay if you want to make a table, but not much fun for any quantity of lumber.

If you have need for both 1 and 2 inch stock, it's a lot easier to just specify both than to plan on resawing dry hardwood to get the thin stuff two plus years down the road. It would be an awful disappointment to cut it open after that time and have it curl.

Just an opinion -- perhaps others have done a better job of sawing and drying than I have. I'd be happy to learn a better way.

Best Regards,

--Steve
Steve Redmond
www.sredmond.com (http://www.sredmond.com)

Steve Redmond
02-29-2004, 03:30 PM
Also, with the price of plywood these days, why waste it covering an outdoor lumber stack?

I like tin roofing for this. It curls a little, too and sheds water better. It needs weighting. Plywood absorbs moisture. It's also too short for anything over 7 feet in length.Overlapping it doesn't work well.

Plastic holds moisture in -- I suppose sometimes there's a need for it if things are drying too fast -- depends on your weather and climate. I don't particularly like it -- it's always a pain, shredding and blowing off. Here in Vermont tin seems to work and last best.

Best Regards,
--Steve

Steve Redmond
www.sredmond.com (http://www.sredmond.com)

Steve Redmond
02-29-2004, 03:30 PM
Also, with the price of plywood these days, why waste it covering an outdoor lumber stack?

I like tin roofing for this. It curls a little, too and sheds water better. It needs weighting. Plywood absorbs moisture. It's also too short for anything over 7 feet in length.Overlapping it doesn't work well.

Plastic holds moisture in -- I suppose sometimes there's a need for it if things are drying too fast -- depends on your weather and climate. I don't particularly like it -- it's always a pain, shredding and blowing off. Here in Vermont tin seems to work and last best.

Best Regards,
--Steve

Steve Redmond
www.sredmond.com (http://www.sredmond.com)

Steve Redmond
02-29-2004, 03:30 PM
Also, with the price of plywood these days, why waste it covering an outdoor lumber stack?

I like tin roofing for this. It curls a little, too and sheds water better. It needs weighting. Plywood absorbs moisture. It's also too short for anything over 7 feet in length.Overlapping it doesn't work well.

Plastic holds moisture in -- I suppose sometimes there's a need for it if things are drying too fast -- depends on your weather and climate. I don't particularly like it -- it's always a pain, shredding and blowing off. Here in Vermont tin seems to work and last best.

Best Regards,
--Steve

Steve Redmond
www.sredmond.com (http://www.sredmond.com)

Bob Smalser
03-01-2004, 12:36 AM
8/4 oak stock will take 2 years to stabilize to the outside air...even in Louisiana.

Depends on the mill, but the carbide Lucas and the better band mills with sharp blades will allow you to cut only an 8th oversize for the thickness planer if the grain is straight. And for my own use, that's how I cut them...much easier to do at the sawmill than resawing in the shop.

If the garage climate is a summer furnace, then stacking and stickering outdoors for the hot summer months or the first 6 months is a good idea.

Tarpaper makes a fine compromize covering in terms of breathability and water resistance....just extend out the upper board decks a ways so the sun doesn't hit the lower board decks. The first pic below is an acceptable stack of DF, which isn't as sensitive to checking as oak and the sides aren't shaded. Shade the oak. The maple in the second stack is shaded by the surrounding forest.

http://pic3.picturetrail.com/VOL12/1104763/3075040/31637402.jpg

http://pic3.picturetrail.com/VOL12/1104763/3075040/40415147.jpg

Bob Smalser
03-01-2004, 12:36 AM
8/4 oak stock will take 2 years to stabilize to the outside air...even in Louisiana.

Depends on the mill, but the carbide Lucas and the better band mills with sharp blades will allow you to cut only an 8th oversize for the thickness planer if the grain is straight. And for my own use, that's how I cut them...much easier to do at the sawmill than resawing in the shop.

If the garage climate is a summer furnace, then stacking and stickering outdoors for the hot summer months or the first 6 months is a good idea.

Tarpaper makes a fine compromize covering in terms of breathability and water resistance....just extend out the upper board decks a ways so the sun doesn't hit the lower board decks. The first pic below is an acceptable stack of DF, which isn't as sensitive to checking as oak and the sides aren't shaded. Shade the oak. The maple in the second stack is shaded by the surrounding forest.

http://pic3.picturetrail.com/VOL12/1104763/3075040/31637402.jpg

http://pic3.picturetrail.com/VOL12/1104763/3075040/40415147.jpg

Bob Smalser
03-01-2004, 12:36 AM
8/4 oak stock will take 2 years to stabilize to the outside air...even in Louisiana.

Depends on the mill, but the carbide Lucas and the better band mills with sharp blades will allow you to cut only an 8th oversize for the thickness planer if the grain is straight. And for my own use, that's how I cut them...much easier to do at the sawmill than resawing in the shop.

If the garage climate is a summer furnace, then stacking and stickering outdoors for the hot summer months or the first 6 months is a good idea.

Tarpaper makes a fine compromize covering in terms of breathability and water resistance....just extend out the upper board decks a ways so the sun doesn't hit the lower board decks. The first pic below is an acceptable stack of DF, which isn't as sensitive to checking as oak and the sides aren't shaded. Shade the oak. The maple in the second stack is shaded by the surrounding forest.

http://pic3.picturetrail.com/VOL12/1104763/3075040/31637402.jpg

http://pic3.picturetrail.com/VOL12/1104763/3075040/40415147.jpg

formerlyknownasprince
03-01-2004, 01:13 AM
Bet you guys just can't wait to join the rest of the world and go metric. 13/16 and 5/4 and 8/4.

Duh?

formerlyknownasprince
03-01-2004, 01:13 AM
Bet you guys just can't wait to join the rest of the world and go metric. 13/16 and 5/4 and 8/4.

Duh?

formerlyknownasprince
03-01-2004, 01:13 AM
Bet you guys just can't wait to join the rest of the world and go metric. 13/16 and 5/4 and 8/4.

Duh?

Bob Smalser
03-01-2004, 08:36 AM
Originally posted by igatenby:
Bet you guys just can't wait to join the rest of the world and go metric. 13/16 and 5/4 and 8/4.

Duh?That'd be fine....or not....don't matter at all at this stage of my game. It is simpler, tho.

Bob Smalser
03-01-2004, 08:36 AM
Originally posted by igatenby:
Bet you guys just can't wait to join the rest of the world and go metric. 13/16 and 5/4 and 8/4.

Duh?That'd be fine....or not....don't matter at all at this stage of my game. It is simpler, tho.

Bob Smalser
03-01-2004, 08:36 AM
Originally posted by igatenby:
Bet you guys just can't wait to join the rest of the world and go metric. 13/16 and 5/4 and 8/4.

Duh?That'd be fine....or not....don't matter at all at this stage of my game. It is simpler, tho.

Steve Redmond
03-04-2004, 10:35 AM
Still counting hours by the 24 aren't you? Minutes by the 60 etc. I imagine that wonderful metric system will have to be completely re-written once time is included. A whole new set of labels, constants, and conversion factors. Oh it will be a pretty sight when consistency reigns, making life simpler for all!

Steve Redmond
www.sredmond.com (http://www.sredmond.com)

Steve Redmond
03-04-2004, 10:35 AM
Still counting hours by the 24 aren't you? Minutes by the 60 etc. I imagine that wonderful metric system will have to be completely re-written once time is included. A whole new set of labels, constants, and conversion factors. Oh it will be a pretty sight when consistency reigns, making life simpler for all!

Steve Redmond
www.sredmond.com (http://www.sredmond.com)

Steve Redmond
03-04-2004, 10:35 AM
Still counting hours by the 24 aren't you? Minutes by the 60 etc. I imagine that wonderful metric system will have to be completely re-written once time is included. A whole new set of labels, constants, and conversion factors. Oh it will be a pretty sight when consistency reigns, making life simpler for all!

Steve Redmond
www.sredmond.com (http://www.sredmond.com)

Steve Redmond
03-04-2004, 11:29 AM
By the way, a couple of tricks to help convert that I find handy enough to use without needing a calculator. These are especially useful when reading magazines or advretisements:

To convert mm to decimal inches, multiply by 4 and advance the decimal point two notches.

Example: 6mm ply.

Multiply 6 by 4 you get 24. Advance the decimal two notches you get .24".

You can do this in your head. The accuracy is within about 3%. Amaze you friends....

To convert from decimal inches to mm, do the reverse. Divide by four and move the decimal point the other way, two notches.

Note: when calculating mentally, you may find it easier to divide by two twice, than to divide by four.)

Centimeters work the same way, except move the decimal point only one notch.

Meters to feet is divide by 3 and back the decimal one notch.

Example: A 12 meter length is: 12 divided by 3, (or 4), then move the decimal one notch to yield 40 feet (within about 3%)

And of course to go the other way, reverse the process. Feet to meters is multiply by 3 and advance the decimal one notch.

Example: A 27 foot boat is 8.1 meters

You can probably work out for yourselves other conversion factors which use this family of fairly simple methods. I find it handy.

Best Regards,

Steve Redmond
www.sredmond.com (http://www.sredmond.com)

Steve Redmond
03-04-2004, 11:29 AM
By the way, a couple of tricks to help convert that I find handy enough to use without needing a calculator. These are especially useful when reading magazines or advretisements:

To convert mm to decimal inches, multiply by 4 and advance the decimal point two notches.

Example: 6mm ply.

Multiply 6 by 4 you get 24. Advance the decimal two notches you get .24".

You can do this in your head. The accuracy is within about 3%. Amaze you friends....

To convert from decimal inches to mm, do the reverse. Divide by four and move the decimal point the other way, two notches.

Note: when calculating mentally, you may find it easier to divide by two twice, than to divide by four.)

Centimeters work the same way, except move the decimal point only one notch.

Meters to feet is divide by 3 and back the decimal one notch.

Example: A 12 meter length is: 12 divided by 3, (or 4), then move the decimal one notch to yield 40 feet (within about 3%)

And of course to go the other way, reverse the process. Feet to meters is multiply by 3 and advance the decimal one notch.

Example: A 27 foot boat is 8.1 meters

You can probably work out for yourselves other conversion factors which use this family of fairly simple methods. I find it handy.

Best Regards,

Steve Redmond
www.sredmond.com (http://www.sredmond.com)

Steve Redmond
03-04-2004, 11:29 AM
By the way, a couple of tricks to help convert that I find handy enough to use without needing a calculator. These are especially useful when reading magazines or advretisements:

To convert mm to decimal inches, multiply by 4 and advance the decimal point two notches.

Example: 6mm ply.

Multiply 6 by 4 you get 24. Advance the decimal two notches you get .24".

You can do this in your head. The accuracy is within about 3%. Amaze you friends....

To convert from decimal inches to mm, do the reverse. Divide by four and move the decimal point the other way, two notches.

Note: when calculating mentally, you may find it easier to divide by two twice, than to divide by four.)

Centimeters work the same way, except move the decimal point only one notch.

Meters to feet is divide by 3 and back the decimal one notch.

Example: A 12 meter length is: 12 divided by 3, (or 4), then move the decimal one notch to yield 40 feet (within about 3%)

And of course to go the other way, reverse the process. Feet to meters is multiply by 3 and advance the decimal one notch.

Example: A 27 foot boat is 8.1 meters

You can probably work out for yourselves other conversion factors which use this family of fairly simple methods. I find it handy.

Best Regards,

Steve Redmond
www.sredmond.com (http://www.sredmond.com)

NormMessinger
03-04-2004, 12:23 PM
How many hectors in a sq. mile? or acres in a sq. kilometer?

NormMessinger
03-04-2004, 12:23 PM
How many hectors in a sq. mile? or acres in a sq. kilometer?

NormMessinger
03-04-2004, 12:23 PM
How many hectors in a sq. mile? or acres in a sq. kilometer?

Steve Redmond
03-06-2004, 12:33 PM
I think it's hectors in a troy ounce.... hectares otherwise?

Steve Rednond
wwwsredmond.com

Steve Redmond
03-06-2004, 12:33 PM
I think it's hectors in a troy ounce.... hectares otherwise?

Steve Rednond
wwwsredmond.com

Steve Redmond
03-06-2004, 12:33 PM
I think it's hectors in a troy ounce.... hectares otherwise?

Steve Rednond
wwwsredmond.com

Stiletto
03-06-2004, 03:56 PM
To convert
square miles into square kilometres multiply by: 2.589988

Acres into hectares, multiply by: 0.4046856

Acres into sq mteres, multiply by: 4046.8564

Divide to convert the other way.

Stiletto
03-06-2004, 03:56 PM
To convert
square miles into square kilometres multiply by: 2.589988

Acres into hectares, multiply by: 0.4046856

Acres into sq mteres, multiply by: 4046.8564

Divide to convert the other way.

Stiletto
03-06-2004, 03:56 PM
To convert
square miles into square kilometres multiply by: 2.589988

Acres into hectares, multiply by: 0.4046856

Acres into sq mteres, multiply by: 4046.8564

Divide to convert the other way.

Paul Scheuer
03-06-2004, 04:42 PM
If God had wanted us to go metric, there would have only been ten apostles. :D

Paul Scheuer
03-06-2004, 04:42 PM
If God had wanted us to go metric, there would have only been ten apostles. :D

Paul Scheuer
03-06-2004, 04:42 PM
If God had wanted us to go metric, there would have only been ten apostles. :D

Stiletto
03-06-2004, 07:26 PM
:D And presumably stuck with pounds, shillings, and pence? :rolleyes:

Stiletto
03-06-2004, 07:26 PM
:D And presumably stuck with pounds, shillings, and pence? :rolleyes:

Stiletto
03-06-2004, 07:26 PM
:D And presumably stuck with pounds, shillings, and pence? :rolleyes:

Venchka
03-15-2004, 02:13 PM
Bump! Life is good, so far.

The post oak and hickory logs are at the sawmill. I told them to take the bark off to avoid bringing critters home. They will stack and sticker the boards in their shed.

I got lumber in the making! :D

Venchka
03-15-2004, 02:13 PM
Bump! Life is good, so far.

The post oak and hickory logs are at the sawmill. I told them to take the bark off to avoid bringing critters home. They will stack and sticker the boards in their shed.

I got lumber in the making! :D

Venchka
03-15-2004, 02:13 PM
Bump! Life is good, so far.

The post oak and hickory logs are at the sawmill. I told them to take the bark off to avoid bringing critters home. They will stack and sticker the boards in their shed.

I got lumber in the making! :D

Wild Dingo
03-28-2004, 10:38 AM
Good one mate! :cool: Aint nuthin like havin a stack or two of timber out the front garden ;)

Bob do you use your own mill or get your timber done by a sawmill? wasnt clear in your post... mmm maybe a dumb question I guess :rolleyes: given you do all your own most things :cool:

Im planning on getting a Lucus mill to work in with a firewood bloke whos got access to a couple of govt contract but is limited to a mad frenzy of cutting two weeks a year when his brother comes over for annual "holidays" so wondered what you thought of it if you have one... as soon as this place is sold... yes its finally on the market!! yeeeflaminha! :D

Wild Dingo
03-28-2004, 10:38 AM
Good one mate! :cool: Aint nuthin like havin a stack or two of timber out the front garden ;)

Bob do you use your own mill or get your timber done by a sawmill? wasnt clear in your post... mmm maybe a dumb question I guess :rolleyes: given you do all your own most things :cool:

Im planning on getting a Lucus mill to work in with a firewood bloke whos got access to a couple of govt contract but is limited to a mad frenzy of cutting two weeks a year when his brother comes over for annual "holidays" so wondered what you thought of it if you have one... as soon as this place is sold... yes its finally on the market!! yeeeflaminha! :D

Wild Dingo
03-28-2004, 10:38 AM
Good one mate! :cool: Aint nuthin like havin a stack or two of timber out the front garden ;)

Bob do you use your own mill or get your timber done by a sawmill? wasnt clear in your post... mmm maybe a dumb question I guess :rolleyes: given you do all your own most things :cool:

Im planning on getting a Lucus mill to work in with a firewood bloke whos got access to a couple of govt contract but is limited to a mad frenzy of cutting two weeks a year when his brother comes over for annual "holidays" so wondered what you thought of it if you have one... as soon as this place is sold... yes its finally on the market!! yeeeflaminha! :D

Bob Smalser
03-28-2004, 10:49 AM
Originally posted by Wild Dingo:
Good one mate! :cool: Aint nuthin like havin a stack or two of timber out the front garden ;)

Bob do you use your own mill or get your timber done by a sawmill? wasnt clear in your post... mmm maybe a dumb question I guess :rolleyes: given you do all your own most things :cool:

Im planning on getting a Lucus mill to work in with a firewood bloke whos got access to a couple of govt contract but is limited to a mad frenzy of cutting two weeks a year when his brother comes over for annual "holidays" so wondered what you thought of it if you have one... as soon as this place is sold... yes its finally on the market!! yeeeflaminha! :D I've had an 8" Lucas with 26' of track for 6 years...and a Belsaw before that.

Lucas is an excellent choice, but look at the newer Pederson's, too, as they have some unique features designed to overcome the Lucas weaknesses.

Bob Smalser
03-28-2004, 10:49 AM
Originally posted by Wild Dingo:
Good one mate! :cool: Aint nuthin like havin a stack or two of timber out the front garden ;)

Bob do you use your own mill or get your timber done by a sawmill? wasnt clear in your post... mmm maybe a dumb question I guess :rolleyes: given you do all your own most things :cool:

Im planning on getting a Lucus mill to work in with a firewood bloke whos got access to a couple of govt contract but is limited to a mad frenzy of cutting two weeks a year when his brother comes over for annual "holidays" so wondered what you thought of it if you have one... as soon as this place is sold... yes its finally on the market!! yeeeflaminha! :D I've had an 8" Lucas with 26' of track for 6 years...and a Belsaw before that.

Lucas is an excellent choice, but look at the newer Pederson's, too, as they have some unique features designed to overcome the Lucas weaknesses.

Bob Smalser
03-28-2004, 10:49 AM
Originally posted by Wild Dingo:
Good one mate! :cool: Aint nuthin like havin a stack or two of timber out the front garden ;)

Bob do you use your own mill or get your timber done by a sawmill? wasnt clear in your post... mmm maybe a dumb question I guess :rolleyes: given you do all your own most things :cool:

Im planning on getting a Lucus mill to work in with a firewood bloke whos got access to a couple of govt contract but is limited to a mad frenzy of cutting two weeks a year when his brother comes over for annual "holidays" so wondered what you thought of it if you have one... as soon as this place is sold... yes its finally on the market!! yeeeflaminha! :D I've had an 8" Lucas with 26' of track for 6 years...and a Belsaw before that.

Lucas is an excellent choice, but look at the newer Pederson's, too, as they have some unique features designed to overcome the Lucas weaknesses.

Venchka
03-24-2005, 05:40 PM
Slightly over a year later...

The Sawmill Lady called. There are three stacks of boards sitting by the mill waiting for me to pick up tomorrow: hickory, oak and sweetgum. I have no clue if she cut the same logs I sent from my property, nor do I care at this point. The sweetgum is lagniappe. If I ever do this again I will stay with the logs/boards until they are stacked and stickered at my house.

At this rate, I'm going to have to build something. :D More good news: huge, multi-family garage sale Saturday morning. :D Better news: I get to see the grandbabies tomorrow! :D :D

Life is good!

Wayne
Leaving on a jet plane in the morning from the Swamp. :D

Venchka
03-24-2005, 05:40 PM
Slightly over a year later...

The Sawmill Lady called. There are three stacks of boards sitting by the mill waiting for me to pick up tomorrow: hickory, oak and sweetgum. I have no clue if she cut the same logs I sent from my property, nor do I care at this point. The sweetgum is lagniappe. If I ever do this again I will stay with the logs/boards until they are stacked and stickered at my house.

At this rate, I'm going to have to build something. :D More good news: huge, multi-family garage sale Saturday morning. :D Better news: I get to see the grandbabies tomorrow! :D :D

Life is good!

Wayne
Leaving on a jet plane in the morning from the Swamp. :D

Venchka
03-24-2005, 05:40 PM
Slightly over a year later...

The Sawmill Lady called. There are three stacks of boards sitting by the mill waiting for me to pick up tomorrow: hickory, oak and sweetgum. I have no clue if she cut the same logs I sent from my property, nor do I care at this point. The sweetgum is lagniappe. If I ever do this again I will stay with the logs/boards until they are stacked and stickered at my house.

At this rate, I'm going to have to build something. :D More good news: huge, multi-family garage sale Saturday morning. :D Better news: I get to see the grandbabies tomorrow! :D :D

Life is good!

Wayne
Leaving on a jet plane in the morning from the Swamp. :D