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D. Handron
05-24-2014, 07:14 AM
My son told me he wanted to build a boat.

I've been building an Oughtred designed Eun na Mara for a while now, and I've been reading the Swallows and Amazons books to him. I think he was inspired by the story where John has to build a new mast after Swallow runs aground. That's the part he has most fixated on.

There are probably other designs that would have allowed him to be more involved in more of the work, but I chose the Shellback kit for a couple reasons. First, he's only 9, and there is plenty of work to do. Second, shaping the mast is what interests him the most, and there is no epoxy involved in that part. Also, it has been a challenge for me to source materials for my Eun na Mara, and to work out just how to complete certain tasks. I've enjoyed that, but the idea of having all the pieces come in a big box has a certain appeal.

One big reason was that I thought having many of the parts arrive partly shaped - planks cut out, stems laminated, transom ready to go - would speed things along. I think that has been true for me so far, but when choosing the design, I had lot of questions. I wasn't sure exactly what the kit parts would be like, and I didn't see a lot of detailed information on the web. I thought this thread would be a valuable resource for anyone considering the kit.

I've been at it only a couple weeks, but so far I am very pleased with the kit. I haven't had any major difficulties, and when I have I've been able to get technical support that is prompt and helpful. In order to give potential builders an idea about the pace of the project, I'm going to follow my work one day at a time. Some days I've worked for hours, and some days only for a short time. Some days I haven't gotten to it at all - I'll skip those.

Next time: The kit arrives!

D. Handron
05-24-2014, 07:34 AM
Day 1: The Kit Arrives!

When you order the kit, some things are shipped from the WoodenBoat offices right away. The plans, the "how to build" book, some supplementary information about the kit, and some hardware - the rudder fittings, and a belaying pin. The rest is shipped from Chesapeake Light Craft, who cut the parts for the kit, and this takes a couple weeks. Once the kit was shipped, I got a tracking number. The shipping company's website says that for residential delivery, they will call to schedule a drop off time. On the scheduled day of delivery, though, I came home to find this:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3432_zpse8a3f157.jpg

The flat packages contain the planking, and the building frame. The long box has everything else - mast, spars, knees, breashooks, tiller, thwarts, and all the hardware needed.

Unpacked, it looks like this:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3434_zps7e799ef5.jpg

In this picture, it may be a bit unclear where the kit leaves off, and the general messiness of the shop begins, but it should give a pretty good idea. I'll get to all the different bits as I work through the kit, but if you have questions, chime in, I'll try to answer them.

Next time: The planking bench.

Doug Schultz
05-24-2014, 01:50 PM
I would send a thank you note to the shipping company for their excellent service. They almost made it to the front door. Pretty good attempt.

Rich Jones
05-24-2014, 02:53 PM
This will be a great experience for your son. He'll enjoy the boat and boating much more, knowing that he crafted some of it with his own hands. It will also teach him patience and how to use hand tools. Looking forward to seeing the progress.
If I might make one suggestion, though.... it might be time to take down the Christmas wreath from the front door.:D

D. Handron
05-25-2014, 06:52 AM
I would send a thank you note to the shipping company for their excellent service. They almost made it to the front door. Pretty good attempt.

Indeed! In fact, it's even closer to the garage... er, boatshop, which is beside the house.

D. Handron
05-25-2014, 08:04 AM
Day 2: The Planking Bench

The Shellback is 11'2" long, and the the plywood planks, which are cut from 4x8 sheets, come in two sections each, and have to be scarfed to their full length. The kit comes with the scarfs already cut, but we'll need a nice flat surface for aligning and gluing. That long box that the parts shipped in is really quite sturdy. The boys immediately recognized that it was worth using for something and had started making plans for it. They were a little disappointed when I told them it would become our planking bench.

I got a few 2x4 sheets of 1/2 inch plywood, and screwed them to the top. Three sheets make a 12' long surface which is just long enough for the longest plank. Here is the result.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3435_zpsfde2c721.jpg

It might be nice to give the bench legs, but time's a wastin'. When the planking is done, and we remake this into a spar bench, then I'll give it some legs for a more convenient working height. As it is, it can conveniently fit under the sheer of my other project, which is still bottom up. Space is at a premium when building two boats in a two car garage... or rather, 24x24 boatshop.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3548_zps7703890f.jpg

That's the sheer strake on the bench right now. The opening at the far end of the bench is actually a "tool tray." I'm using it to store the bits of hardware that I haven't gotten to use yet.

The kit comes with MAS epoxy.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3439_zps96e308e3.jpg

I've only used System Three epoxy before, so I'm glad to have a chance to try something different. So far, I've been impressed. The resin is their "low viscosity" variety, and it is lower in viscosity than System Three's "general purpose" epoxy, which is what I've used in the past. It also cures a little clearer. The MAS brand silica thickener doesn't seem to mix in as easily as the System Three silica. Using the MAS silica, I've been ending up with a lot of small (the size of a poppy seed, or a little smaller) lumps that are resistant to dissolving. Maybe I'm not being patient enough.

The pumps are calibrated to give the correct 2:1 ratio of resin to hardener. One squirt from each pump. My only complaint about these pumps is that the pump on the resin is slow to return to the top. It takes some concentration to wait until it returns fully before adding the second squirt. Not much of a complaint, really.

Next time: Bottom panel and building jig.

heavyweather
05-25-2014, 08:06 AM
I am watching.
Let us know what works where done by your son and where he needed help.

D. Handron
05-26-2014, 08:49 AM
If I might make one suggestion, though.... it might be time to take down the Christmas wreath from the front door.:D

It would have been very clever to take it down before Mr. and Mrs. Robin made it their home.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/Wildlife/IMG_3565_zpsdd8c7ced.jpg

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/Wildlife/IMG_3564_zpsfe1442b5.jpg

We've also had a fawn bedding down in our front yard.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/Wildlife/IMG_3518_zps54d397df.jpg

That's our excuse for not mowing the lawn. It's like we're living in some kind of a nature center!

But back to the boats...

D. Handron
05-26-2014, 09:18 AM
Day 3: Gluing the Bottom Panel and Setting Up the Building Jig

With the planking bench in hand, it's time to start gluing the planks together, starting with the bottom. The bottom panel is different from the others in that it of 1/2" plywood; the others are 1/4 inch. It also has an unusual stepped scarf cut into it.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3438_zpsd970a56e.jpg

Like all the materials, these scarfs are well protected during shipping, in this case by some foam padding and bubble wrap.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3440_zps4f22fdaf.jpg

The other planks didn't get the foam padding treatment, but had plenty of bubble wrap, and all survived the trip with no ill effects.

Once the resin and hardener mix, timeliness and cleanliness work against the photographer, but I have before and after photos to share. First, the two halves are laid out, with plastic sheeting separating them from the bench surface.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3443_zps801c5a8c.jpg

The mating surfaces are given a coat of unthickened epoxy, and then one side is coated with thickened epoxy. I usually shoot for a consistency between honey and peanut butter for this application. Alignment is important, but the stepped scarf makes this quite easy. It really wants to be aligned in just the right way. After everything is in place, another piece of plastic is laid over the joint, and a board is clamped across the whole thing. I also happened to have a small trash can full of rocks. It's not good for very much, but it's just right for holding things flat.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3445_zpsb21cf540.jpg

While the epoxy cures, the boys and I set up the building jig. It's made of sturdy particle board, and slots together with "egg-crate" joints. There are a couple spots that need screws. The central rails are in two pieces, and there is some bracing that holds the stem, keeping it from shifting from side to side. Also the transom must be screwed to the jig. My older boys helped align things and slide them together, then the ship's baby gave his sign of approval.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3451_zps0bb32358.jpg

I'll leave things here, with my artistic shot of the day:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3457_zpsdd52144b.jpg

Next time: Raising and leveling the building jig.

D. Handron
05-26-2014, 10:13 PM
I am watching.
Let us know what works where done by your son and where he needed help.

Thanks, heavyweather.

Just to be clear, it's really more that my kids are helping me; I'm doing most of the work. My boys are 12, 9, and 18 months. The youngest can't do what most people would consider useful work, but several times a day he insists on going out to pat the boat. He loves being part of the family project, and is very cute (at least I think so) so you may see more pictures of him.

My nine year old was the one who suggested that we build a boat. I jumped at the idea because, hey, my son wants to build a boat, just like me. Also, I'd been thinking about buying a small sailboat. My own project is dragging on, and I want to get on the water with my family. He's been a good worker, but he's nine, and he likes to do jobs where he can see progress being made. (Don't we all!) He helps with layout work, though he gets tired quickly. He's done a good deal of planing - he actually works quite hard at that.

My 12 year old has a three more years of skill. But he is also involved in a lot of other activities. He, like his brother, has been beveling planks with a hand plane. I've let him clean up some scarfs with a random orbit sander, and I think I'll let both the older boys clean up the hull with this tool.

I should note that in the interests of making this truly a family project, my wife has also had a go with the hand plane.

I've done all the epoxy work myself so far, and I think I'll continue that way. I'd consider letting the boys help mix epoxy, but applying it to the boat can get messy pretty quickly, and this is not a mess you want to make.

My strategy so far has been to identify things the boys can help with, and save those up until they are home from school and have their work done. Then, "Boys, I need help with the boat."

I thought a good bit about what design to build, and one of the factors was how much work they could do themselves. There are definitely other designs that would allow them to do more. In the end, the appeal of a well regarded design, and the kit won out. There are some drawbacks to building from a kit. If you mess something up, it's much harder to start fresh. All in all, it's been helpful in moving the project along.

That's the long answer. The short answer is: I'll definitely try to point out what I did, and what the boys did themselves.

heavyweather
05-27-2014, 06:07 AM
I also got three sons. So far they are not really helping but the oldest (5 1/2) got his own electric drill and does handplane stringer edges quite satisfactory. The second (2years last week) likes to climb on boats when they are upside down. The smallest is 6month.
I built a small canoe last year for the oldest. He also likes to sail and overtake other boats when they are tacking and we are pedalling upwind...

need to click them for a bigger version...don't want to invade your thread by posting HUGE pictures ;)
http://thumbnails108.imagebam.com/27052/a808f9270513768.jpg (http://www.imagebam.com/image/a808f9270513768) http://thumbnails106.imagebam.com/27195/4aa521271941086.jpg (http://www.imagebam.com/image/4aa521271941086)



When gluing I like to be on my own...

You should get some light boat for sailing...better go sailing than work on the boat in summer...or maybe you will habe finished the SD before July.
I love SOF cause they are built quick and you can cartop them fast.

D. Handron
05-27-2014, 08:42 AM
Day 4: Raising and Leveling the Building Jig

The building jig needs to be raised up off the ground. Even if you wanted to work on your hands and knees, the stem needs to project below the lowest point of the jig. You can raise it to whatever working height is comfortable. I wanted my kids to be able to reach to work on the highest parts, so when we get to the sheet strake, it will be a bit lower than is really comfortable for me. That's one of the sacrifices we parents make!

I don't have a lot of photos to show of this process, but you can see part of it in a picture in post #9. Behind my smiling boy, you can see a level placed across the jig, and just in front of him, a small torpedo level along the jig. The floor of my shop is uneven, so the legs are all slightly different lengths. I just clamped some short 2x4's to the jig - you can see those in the picture, too. Then I adjusted with taps from a mallet until everything was level fore and aft and side to side. Then I screwed through the jig into the 2x4's. I added a third set of legs to give support to the middle of the jig. Then I marked the locations of the feet on the floor with masking tape. That way if it slides a little bit, I can get it back to where everything was level.

I wanted to make a few comments about building from the kit vs. building from plans. I've built one other boat from a kit- a stitch and glue kayak from Pygmy Boats. For that project, no plans were provided, and none were needed. There was an instruction book that told what to do, stet by step. When you order this kit from WoodenBoat, the first thing that comes in the mail is the building plans, along with the "how to build" book. The plans really are a necessary part of the building process, even with the book.

I've referred to the plans several times in setting up the building jig: to make sure the temporary molds are in the right locations, to make sure I have the permanent frame oriented correctly (in front of the cross piece, rather than behind). Looking forward a bit, I transferred the plank land marks and baseline from the plans to the stem to make sure that was in the correct location, and I marked the sheer and location of the sculling notch onto the transom by reading them off of the plans.

I would say my experience so far in building the Shellback has been somewhere between my Pygmy kit, and the Eun na Mara that I'm building directly from the plans.

StevenBauer
05-27-2014, 05:21 PM
I'm lovin' this thread, D. I've built boats with all of my kids, the youngest one's still only half done. I also have Eun Mara plans (and molds, stems, lead and planking plywood). Keep it coming. And I agree, the little guy is the star of the show.


Steven

andrewpatrol
05-28-2014, 03:04 AM
Great thread, keep it up. My kids are a bit old now but I would have loved to built boats with them.

Sailor
05-28-2014, 05:59 AM
I'm trying to build a boat while including my son but he's living out of province with his mother now. Tough to include him but when he's at my place we work on our boat together. Catspaw. I'm not waiting for him to be here to finish though. I'd like to complet the boat at some point.

StevenBauer
05-28-2014, 07:53 AM
I like MAS epoxy a lot. But they don't carry it at Hamilton Marine anymore. So I use System Three. Their GelMagic pre thickened epoxy is awesome. No need to add thickening agents. Just mix and glue.


Steven

Willin'
05-28-2014, 08:34 AM
Great thread! I'm sure the kit includes the breasthook and quarterknees but I'm wondering if it includes material for an inwhale and are the woods suitable for finishing bright?

Keep up the good work!

D. Handron
05-28-2014, 08:33 PM
Day 5: The Stem and Cleaning up the Bottom

Wow, lots of folks chiming in. That's great!

Day five didn't see a lot of work, but it was some fun, anyway. The plans include a full size pattern for the stem, and the pattern shows where each plank should land on the stem, as well as a couple other alignment marks. The stem comes fully laminated in the kit, with the inner and outer stem bundled together. The inner stem is nicely shaped where it mates with the bottom, but unfortunately I don't have a picture of that.

I laid the inner stem over the full size pattern and transferred the lines using a "saddle square" from Veritas:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3448_zpsa95593c4.jpg

Marks are shown for the first and second plank laps, the sheer, and the 1/2 station mark and the 15" baseline (the baseline for the building jig, which is 15" above the waterline). After tracing the line up both faces of the stem, they can be connected across the side - being careful to match up the right lines!

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3447_zpsc1493c63.jpg

Aligning the stem on the building frame was a little tricky. The station 1/2 mark ought to be enough to get it aligned correctly, and in the end it would have been fine if i had done that and called it a day. I wanted to make sure the 15" mark was aligned at the same time, as a check that the jig was set up properly, and that I really knew what I was doing.

The plans show full size patterns for the station molds, and the 15" line is marked on these. The tricky bit is that the base of the building jig is not the 15" baseline. I had to mark the 15" line on the station 1/2 mold, and then transfer the line to the "nose" that points forward from the station 1/2 mold and supports the stem. At first it seemed like something was off, but it may just have been that I wasn't looking straight at the marks. In the end, everything was aligned, and I secured the stem with a screw through the "nose" into the stem.

The hardware included with the kit seems very complete, and includes a pound of deck screws for temporary fastenings, but these were not long enough for this application. I ended up using some 3" deck screws that I had to secure the stem, and the bracing that keeps the stem from moving from side to side.

Before calling it a night, I cleaned up the scarf in the bottom panel. Some of the epoxy squeezes out of the joint, and makes a splotch on the face of the panel. This is good, though. It means there is enough epoxy in the joint. But it doesn't look good. I tried a few different things, but in the end a random orbit sander with 60 grit paper worked best.

Next Time: Beveling the stem, and more layout marks.

D. Handron
05-28-2014, 08:57 PM
...need to click them for a bigger version... ;)
http://thumbnails108.imagebam.com/27052/a808f9270513768.jpg (http://www.imagebam.com/image/a808f9270513768) http://thumbnails106.imagebam.com/27195/4aa521271941086.jpg (http://www.imagebam.com/image/4aa521271941086)


I love that little T-Rex canoe!



...better go sailing than work on the boat in summer...or maybe you will habe finished the SD before July.


I have high hopes!

D. Handron
05-28-2014, 09:02 PM
I also have Eun Mara plans (and molds, stems, lead and planking plywood).

Steven

Portland's not so far from Pittsburgh. If we ever get them finished, maybe we can go for a cruise in company. That would turn some heads, I think.

D. Handron
05-28-2014, 09:08 PM
I'm trying to build a boat while including my son but he's living out of province with his mother now. Tough to include him but when he's at my place we work on our boat together. Catspaw. I'm not waiting for him to be here to finish though. I'd like to complet the boat at some point.

I'm sorry to hear that, Sailor. The boat must be a great way for the two of you to connect when you are together, though. The Catspaw is a beautiful boat.

I've been following your Brother's Shellback build thread. It looks like it's coming along nicely.

D. Handron
05-28-2014, 09:16 PM
I like MAS epoxy a lot. But they don't carry it at Hamilton Marine anymore. So I use System Three. Their GelMagic pre thickened epoxy is awesome. No need to add thickening agents. Just mix and glue.


Steven

I've been impressed with the MAS epoxy. The System Three silica is consistently making a much smoother mix, though. They have different adjectives. One is "Fumed Silica," or is it "Fused." The other is "Colloidal Silica," or something like that. Even in the tubs, the System Three product is fluffier.

Is Hamilton Marine a brick and mortar store in Maine? I only know it as an internet storefront. I've gotten some bronze hardware from them, and been happy with their service. I've been ordering my epoxy direct from System Three. The have pretty good customer support, too.

D. Handron
05-28-2014, 09:31 PM
Great thread! I'm sure the kit includes the breasthook and quarterknees but I'm wondering if it includes material for an inwhale and are the woods suitable for finishing bright?

Keep up the good work!

Thanks, Willin'.

The materials seem to be very high quality. I've been impressed. I seem to remember that the plywood is sepale. It may say that in the information in the WoodenBoat store. Most of the solid wood bits are mahogany, I think, including the breasthook, quarterknees and mast partners. There are both an outwhale and inwhale, with material for spacer blocks. These are also mahogany, as is the tiller.

The thwarts, seat supports and spars are some kind of softwood, but I'm not sure what species.

My son wants to finish the entire hull bright. The material will certainly support that. The workmanship? Well, we'll see.

Sailor's Brother
05-29-2014, 07:30 AM
Thanks, Willin'.

The materials seem to be very high quality. I've been impressed. I seem to remember that the plywood is sepale. It may say that in the information in the WoodenBoat store. Most of the solid wood bits are mahogany, I think, including the breasthook, quarterknees and mast partners. There are both an outwhale and inwhale, with material for spacer blocks. These are also mahogany, as is the tiller.

The thwarts, seat supports and spars are some kind of softwood, but I'm not sure what species.

My son wants to finish the entire hull bright. The material will certainly support that. The workmanship? Well, we'll see.


I do love a bright finish... but for me, my finish work on the hull just didn't support that... the scarph joints were not nice enouth... so I didn't bother spending time working around putting screw holes in the plywood (which I would have done if the joint was cleaner)... I did manage to keep the transom from being screwed into... so that's a small victory...

I do wonder how much less work the kit model is.. it's looking like you got done in a couple weekends what took me the first 4 years to accomplish (4 years that included 2 moves, 1 more kid, and 13 months of being a single parent while SWMBO deployed, but still 4 years)

looking forward to seeing things assemble :-) the building jig alone looks so brilliant for a kit... lightweight, easy to mass produce, but strong enough... lovely

D. Handron
05-29-2014, 12:14 PM
Day 6: Beveling the Stem and More Layout Marks

A couple days of real life separated days 5 and 6 of boat building, but I won't bore you with those...

The transom in the kit is beveled for you and the laminated frame at station 2 doesn't require beveling, but the inner stem must be beveled to create a flat surface where the planks land. The plans show a cut-away diagram showing how everything should come together. You can just see it peeking out at the top of this photo (a repeat from post #18):

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3448_zpsa95593c4.jpg

I measured the size of the corner to remove and set a marking gauge to that depth. Then I ran it down the stem on the front face, and the sides. I used a block plane to trim down to the lines. It went pretty quickly, and would have been even faster if I had planed the bevel along the whole length. I like to make a hard stop at the sheer, though. This helps me position the sheer strake, and when the outer stem is glued on, it makes a flat side, which I think is nice if, when finished, the stem will be cut off above the sheer line. I think I'm in the minority in this practice.

The block plane can't reach into that corner. A spokeshave would get closer, but not all the way, and I don't have one. So, out came the chisel. I sawed down the sheer line to the bevel lines, creating the stop at the end, and then pared down to the bevel lines with a hammer and chisel. The good news is that this all is hidden by the planking; it doesn't need to be showroom quality work. Good enough is just fine. Here I am partway through the process.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3458_zpsa7345c0a.jpg

Also on Day 6, my son helped me with the alignment marks on the bottom plank. The plans show how to layout the planks on 4x8 sheets of plywood, and included in that layout are alignment marks showing where the planks should meet the molds. The kit comes with the planks already cut out, and the reference lines needed to draw the alignment marks are not there. Instead you are instructed to measure a certain distance from the tip of the plank to each side, and connect the lines to create the alignment mark. It seems to work pretty well and helps get the plank into position. It's much easier than I've made it sound.

I also transferred measurements shown on the plans to the transom, marking the curved top and sculling notch. Marks are given for the sheer on the transom pattern, and the height above the sheer at the center line. I ran a batten along these points, and traced the edge to make the arc. The center and radius of the sculling notch are shown with respect to the sheer, and I used a compass to mark that circle. At some point I'll have to cut these out, but not yet. The waste at the top of the transom is shaped to slide right into the building frame, and put everything right in it's place.

Next Time: Finish beveling the stem, and hanging the bottom panel.

heavyweather
05-29-2014, 12:49 PM
I like watching people work with handtool. You are doing a great job!

I am lazy... Would have cut the bevel on the band saw and probably finished it with the flex and powerfile.

D. Handron
05-30-2014, 06:27 PM
Day 7: Finish Beveling the Stem and Hanging the Bottom Panel

Do you "hang" the bottom panel? I know you hang planks, but you don't hang a keel. I don't know. Oh well.

On Day 7 I finished beveling the stem, as I described before. It's one of the jobs I really look forward to, for some reason. After that, I screwed it back in place on the building jig, and then it's time to start making pieces into a boat.

With the center line and alignment marks on the bottom, I placed it on the building jig, setting the alignment marks on the station lines, but in the end, I had to scoot the bottom back a bit. I figured the width of the bottom panel should match the width of the flat on the bottom of the transom where they come together. In this photo, you can see where the alignment mark was, and where I ended up placing the panel. The bottom is lifted up off the transom here, but the two lines on either side of the screw hole mark the location of the fore and aft face of the transom.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3459_zps04b287c8.jpg

It's a weird angle - an upside down, rudder's eye view. I'm standing directly behind the transom, looking down toward the upside down boat. I clamped two pieces of scrap to the transom to help align the drill as I drill the pilot hole through the plank and into the transom. If you drill straight down into the bottom, the screw will come out the forward face, because of the rake of the transom. The "how to build" book makes this sound harder than it really is, but it's an important point to notice.

Here's the drill's eye view:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3460_zps9d315336.jpg

If I had held the bottom down onto the transom, you could have seen how everything lines up. Oh, well. Once the bottom is screwed at the transom, I lined the edges up with the laminated frame at station 2. I made sure they would match up before drilling the hole at the transom! Magically, when I did this, the forward tip lined up with the center of the stem. Or nearly so. A little nudging did the trick.

Here is the bottom panel screwed to the stem, center frame, and transom. The plans show two screws in the stem, and the book clearly describes one screw in the transom, but I didn't see a prescribed number of screws for the center frame. After counting the screws that came with the kit, and where they would be used, it seemed like four should be a good number.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3461_zps80a76fd1.jpg

The panel wanted to lift off at station 1, so I held it down with a couple clamps. I'm not sure it made too much difference in the end, but I try to keep things as close to the lines as possible.

When you drill for the screws at the center frame, take care that you avoid the limber holes! If the screw turns and turns, but never pulls tight, that may be what has happened. Don't ask me how I know. After everything is fit: unscrew, lift the bottom off, coat the mating surfaces with straight epoxy, then thickened epoxy on the stem, frame and transom. Carefully set the bottom back in place, screw it down, and let it cure.

Next Time: Beveling the Bottom

D. Handron
05-30-2014, 07:43 PM
I do love a bright finish... but for me, my finish work on the hull just didn't support that... the scarph joints were not nice enouth... so I didn't bother spending time working around putting screw holes in the plywood (which I would have done if the joint was cleaner)... I did manage to keep the transom from being screwed into... so that's a small victory...


I agree with you S.B. If it were up to me, I'd paint it white and varnish the trim and spars. Maybe a grey interior with the seats a contrasting color. But it's the kid's boat, and they want it bright. If it looks like kids built it, that's just fine. As my wife said, when they're 15, they should look at it and think, "I can do better than that, now."



I do wonder how much less work the kit model is.. it's looking like you got done in a couple weekends what took me the first 4 years to accomplish (4 years that included 2 moves, 1 more kid, and 13 months of being a single parent while SWMBO deployed, but still 4 years)

looking forward to seeing things assemble :-) the building jig alone looks so brilliant for a kit... lightweight, easy to mass produce, but strong enough... lovely

I think the kit saves a huge amount of work. I'm guessing it would take me 2 weeks to build the jig from scratch, instead of an afternoon. Add another week or more to lay out and cut the panels. Then plane the scarfs. For the interior work I don't think the time savings will be as much, but it will still be a bit shorter. It also saves the mental/emotional energy that goes toward deciding whether the thwarts should be fir, mahogany, or stair treads from the home center.

Still, I've been working pretty hard, taking advantage of some down time at work, and putting off some other jobs around the house. Not really a sustainable pace, but I'm hoping I can keep it up until we launch her. If it makes you feel any better, I've been working on my Eun na Mara for 13 years.

D. Handron
05-30-2014, 07:50 PM
I like watching people work with handtool. You are doing a great job!

I am lazy... Would have cut the bevel on the band saw and probably finished it with the flex and powerfile.

Thanks, heavyweather. I'm not primarily a hand tool user by any means. When I beveled the stem for my Eun na Mara, I used a power plane. It didn't occur to me to use the bandsaw for this, though that would have worked pretty well. In the end the stem was not that big, and the block plane just seemed easiest. I must say, the more I work with hand tools, the more I enjoy it. There is less setup; you can just pick up the tool and get to work. As they say, the mistakes happen more slowly with hand tools.

D. Handron
05-31-2014, 09:33 PM
Day 8: Beveling the Bottom Panel

The deges of the bottom panel must be beveled so that the garboard lays smoothly against it, making a good gluing surface. The "how to build" book describes how to lay a batten where the lower edge of the garboard will be, and use a straight scrap of wood to check for the correct bevel along the length of the bottom. I must say, that I was a little cavalier in how I went about this task. I didn't use the batten to check along the length. I sawed a kerf at each station, sighting along the molds, to indicate the correct depth and angle for the bevel. Then went to work. I tried to make sure the sole of the plane was parallel to each mold as it went along, and I tried to keep the exposed glue lines between the plies running relatively straight between the stations. This seemed to work pretty well.

The whole family lent a hand with the work. I showed my 9 year old how to hold the block plane and sight along the molds.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3472_zps0f0e3102.jpg

Then he had a go.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3473_zpsf8766cbe.jpg

Mom did her share of the work.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3479_zps61153ff1.jpg

And the results:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3491_zpsbc0fa215.jpg

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3492_zps5684412b.jpg

And, to finish the day, another artistic shot.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3467_zpsb43cd129.jpg

Next time: Alignment marks on the garboard and sorting screws.

potomac
06-01-2014, 08:00 AM
Pretty special stuff having the whole family involved. Looks great.

D. Handron
06-01-2014, 07:00 PM
Day 9: Alignment Marks on the Garboard and Sorting Screws

Nothing showy or flashy today. My son and I put the alignment marks on the garboard strake, just as we did for the bottom: measure back a certain distance on each side from the forward most point of the strake (72 1/4" and 71 9/16" in the case of the garboard). Then I spent some quiet time sorting screws.

The kit comes with a bag of hardware, most of it bronze screws of various sizes. 321 screws in 10 different sizes are included (not counting a pound of drywall screws for temporary fasteners. The kit includes a schedule of what size screws are to be used where. For example, the fifty #8 3/4" screws are to screw through the plank and into the guardrail. The twelve #10 1.5" screws are to screw the breasthook and stern knees to the planks. So I spent a quiet afternoon separating these to make my life a little easier down the line. There is something peaceful and zen-like about this sort of task. Or maybe that's just OCD.

Next Time: Dry fitting the Garboard

D. Handron
06-02-2014, 08:44 PM
Day 10: Dry Fitting the Garboard

With the bottom beveled, I tried the garboard in place. With the alignment mark on the garboard set at the after side of the center frame, the alignment at the transom and stem were pretty good. It took a little sliding and nudging before everything matched up just right, though. It is critical to get the edge of the plank to lay at the corner of the center frame and the transom, so that the subsequent planks will lay against it properly. If those are in the correct place, the alignment at the stem can't be too far off, either.

While this fitting is going on, I held the plank in place with a contrivance of clamps and scraps. Once everything was where it belonged, I added a screw at the center frame. Then screws at the transom to fix that end in place. Next, screws into the stem, and finally the rest of the screws at the midship frame. I did take the "how to build" books advice and saw of the excess plank at the stem before trying to place the screws at the stem.

Once that was done I took the plank off, and planed the gain at the bow end of the plank. This lets the overlapping planks lie flush at the stem post. The overlap is supposed to be 3/4", and so I set my rebate plane to that and went to work. I didn't follow the guidance in the "how to build" book, but stuck with what I've done in the past. The 1/4" plywood is 5-ply. I planed through 2 plies on the garboard, planning to plane through three plies on the broadstrake, so that at the stem there would be five plies all together. I didn't really take any pictures of this, I guess, so this is not a very good tutorial! Suffice it to say, that I learned from Iain Oughtred's "Clinker Plywood Boatbuilding Manual."

Here is the result:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3496_zps955193db.jpg

and from the stern:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3495_zpsb7a6d9ef.jpg

The astute reader will notice the telltale blob of epoxy which shows that this is no dry fit at all. This is the plank glued in place! Well, I though we needed some more pictures.

Next time: Gluing the port side garboard.

D. Handron
06-04-2014, 10:12 AM
Day 11: Gluing the Port Side Garboard

Egad! I let a day slide by. In a way, that was appropriate, because in the real world three agonizing days passed between fitting the garboard and epoxying it in place. Having worked out all the difficulties during the dry fit, there were no surprises. Well, I'm always surprised that it takes twice as long as I expect, but I'm used to that surprise.

Since I've shown all my good pictures of epoxying the garbaoard in place when I talked about the dry fit, I'll show you something now that really has more to do with the fitting. Here it is:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3501_zpsa3a43b1b.jpg


So, what is it? It's a guide to help find the locations for the screws through the plank and into the transom. The plank overruns the transom by a couple inches, and it can be difficult to figure out where to put the screws so that they will go into the edge of the transom. Here I have two pieces of plywood clamped to a longer piece of wood. The edges of the plywood are parallel, but thy are offset by the thickness of the transom. So when the edge of the plywood on the left is resting on the outboard face of the transom, the edge of the plywood on the right shows the location of the inboard face. The gap between them gives room for the plank to run past the transom. This way I can trace a line showing the projection of the transom through the plank. If the two pieces of plywood are in line with each other, it will mark the projection of the outboard face. If the screws start between the lines (and are headed in the right direction!) they will go right into the transom.

Some of these holes are angled quite steeply into the planks. The drill bit wants to skip along the plank instead of drilling in. If found it works best to drill straight into the plank to a depth about the same as the diameter of the drill bit, then move the drill to the proper angle.

D. Handron
06-04-2014, 01:12 PM
Day 12: Prepare to fit the Starboard Garboard

The next task is to fit the starboard garboard. The garboard planks overlap the bottom, and at the bow and stern, the overlap is enough to interfere with the plank on the opposite side. The garboard planks will be planed down flush with the bottom eventually, so I've started that now.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3498_zps595f05ab.jpg

There's still a bit of work to do here. This next photo is not as clear, but I've started doing the same thing at the bow.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3496_zps955193db.jpg

You can clearly see the shavings, and if you squint, you can convince yourself that you can see the beginning of the bevel.

Next Time: Fitting the Starboard Garboard.

capefox
06-04-2014, 01:50 PM
Looks a lot like the construction process for a Nutshell. Not surprising since J. White designed them both.

Sailor's Brother
06-05-2014, 06:56 AM
Day 12: Prepare to fit the Starboard Garboard

The next task is to fit the starboard garboard. The garboard planks overlap the bottom, and at the bow and stern, the overlap is enough to interfere with the plank on the opposite side. The garboard planks will be planed down flush with the bottom eventually, so I've started that now.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3498_zps595f05ab.jpg

There's still a bit of work to do here. This next photo is not as clear, but I've started doing the same thing at the bow.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3496_zps955193db.jpg

You can clearly see the shavings, and if you squint, you can convince yourself that you can see the beginning of the bevel.

Next Time: Fitting the Starboard Garboard.

Does the kit come with the rabbet we see here already planed into the plankes? or was the process of putting it in so boring that it didn't merit pictures?

D. Handron
06-05-2014, 09:38 AM
Looks a lot like the construction process for a Nutshell. Not surprising since J. White designed them both.

Yeah, I think they are very similar. The Pooduck Skiff is also like a Shellback, but two feet longer with an extra thwart. Have you built a Nutshell?

D. Handron
06-05-2014, 10:53 AM
Does the kit come with the rabbet we see here already planed into the plankes? or was the process of putting it in so boring that it didn't merit pictures?

Neither!

Aside from the scarfs, the plywood planks are straight-sided, not beveled at all. I might claim that the process of planing the rebate was so interesting that I forgot to take pictures. I think I just got on a roll, and was done before I got a chance to take pictures. I don't think I got photos of planing any of these rebates. Here is a picture from when I was planking my Eun na Mara. This is thicker plywood (9mm), but I used basically the same approach to bevel the garboard.

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-QrVi5I59ETE/ULLmPyQWvjI/AAAAAAAAAL4/WNQfCQV9VU4/s1600/IMG_1710.JPG

The Shellback plans say the plank overlap should be 3/4". I set the fence on my rebate plane to 3/4" and planed away two layers of the plywood. The next plank gets planed down to a thickness of two plies, so when they overlap at the stem they combine to the same thickness as the original plywood.

This didn't exactly work out for the Shellback. For my Eun na Mara, I had to shape each plank, and in doing so, was able to make sure that each plank overlapped by the exact amount (and thereby correcting for any errors in hanging the previous plank). I had some trouble getting a consistent overlap between the planks, and I had to plane the other gains by tacking a batten to the plank, and running the plane against that. I didn't find that as satisfactory, or as fun, but it worked.

I'll definitely point out the problem areas when I post them in a couple days.

Sailor's Brother
06-05-2014, 11:20 AM
Neither!

Aside from the scarfs, the plywood planks are straight-sided, not beveled at all. I might claim that the process of planing the rebate was so interesting that I forgot to take pictures. I think I just got on a roll, and was done before I got a chance to take pictures. I don't think I got photos of planing any of these rebates. Here is a picture from when I was planking my Eun na Mara. This is thicker plywood (9mm), but I used basically the same approach to bevel the garboard.

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-QrVi5I59ETE/ULLmPyQWvjI/AAAAAAAAAL4/WNQfCQV9VU4/s1600/IMG_1710.JPG

The Shellback plans say the plank overlap should be 3/4". I set the fence on my rebate plane to 3/4" and planed away two layers of the plywood. The next plank gets planed down to a thickness of two plies, so when they overlap at the stem they combine to the same thickness as the original plywood.

This didn't exactly work out for the Shellback. For my Eun na Mara, I had to shape each plank, and in doing so, was able to make sure that each plank overlapped by the exact amount (and thereby correcting for any errors in hanging the previous plank). I had some trouble getting a consistent overlap between the planks, and I had to plane the other gains by tacking a batten to the plank, and running the plane against that. I didn't find that as satisfactory, or as fun, but it worked.

I'll definitely point out the problem areas when I post them in a couple days.

I only asked because I do so enjoy the Stanley 78 (or 778 in your case... a newer varient I guess)... with a razor sharp blade on it, it's so much fun.. Please excuse my tool love driven threadrift..

D. Handron
06-05-2014, 05:45 PM
I only asked because I do so enjoy the Stanley 78 (or 778 in your case... a newer varient I guess)... with a razor sharp blade on it, it's so much fun..

Actually, mine is a Record 778. I guess it may be patterned after the Stanley 78. Strangely, Wikipedia has very little to say about these tools. I guess the set of hand-plane enthusiasts and the set of Wikipedia article editors have a small intersection.


Please excuse my tool love driven threadrift..

Don't mention it!

D. Handron
06-05-2014, 08:51 PM
Day 13: Fitting and Gluing Starboard Garboard

Work kept me away from the Falcon (that will be her name, when she's done) for another day, but I made up for lost time. On Day 13, I fit the starboard garboard strake and glued it in place.

As with the port side, I used some support blocks, and plywood clamps to hold things steady while I worked the plank into position, first lining up at the center frame, then the at the transom, and finally, at the stem. Once those marks fall into place, there really can't be too much misalignment at the other stations. One issue that does require some attention is that the plank wants to lift off the station molds. I had to devise a way to keep it in place, and I was mostly successful, but I did a better job with the later planks.

Once everything seems right, I put a screw through the plank into the center frame, and then a screw into the transom. After that I work out from the center frame along the lap with the bottom plank. I put a drywall screw in about every 6 to 8 inches, but no more than I have to. After each screw, I look ahead, and see where the plank starts to lift off again. That's were the next screw goes. As I work my way toward the stern, I add additional screws into the transom. I think I put 4 screws into the transom through each of the garboard planks.

As I get toward the stem, I also start adding the screws there. Here you can see the situation just before I add a screw into the stem.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3499_zps8637089e.jpg

Here you can see where I've added a permanent bronze screw into the stem, as well as some more temporary drywall screws.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3500_zps4c957914.jpg

Once everything is in place, the screws are all removed and the plank comes off. The mating surfaces are given a coat of unthickened epoxy. The bevel on the bottom and the frame, transom and stem are given a bead of thickened epoxy. The bottom is set gently in place, with one screw in the center frame ready to drive in. Then the other screws are added one at a time, along the bottom plank and then at the transom and stem. Here it is:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3515_zps82d99484.jpg

You can see a healthy amount of squeeze-out, so there must be enough epoxy in the joint. "Scrape it off now, while it's easy," I tell myself. Every time I sand epoxy, I vow to do a better job the next time I scrape off the squeeze-out. There are always globs seem much larger as I'm slowly sanding them down than they did when a quick swipe with a squeegee or tongue depressor would sweep it away. Oh, well.

Next time: Fitting the broad strakes.

D. Handron
06-06-2014, 11:36 PM
Day 14: Fitting the Broad Strakes

The broad strakes gave me some trouble. I had glued the planks to full length some time before this, and an issue came up there. I think I described in an earlier post the kit's method for aligning the planks before gluing. The tips of the plank are set on a baseline, and the distance from the baseline to the edge of the plank is given at the location of the scarf. Well, the distance for the broad strake given in the handbook is not correct. I think it was off by an inch. I wrote to the wooden boat store to ask about this, and they forwarded my message to Chesapeake Light Craft, where the kit parts are cut.

Someone there wrote back quite quickly to say that if the handbook seems that far off, just glue the plank the way it wants to align itself. The fellow there said that when he builds from the kit, he doesn't worry about measuring these offsets. He just glues them up "freehand." This confirmed what I suspected was the case, but it was definitely nice to hear from an authority. The way the scarf joints are cut, they want to align themselves. There is a little bit of movement possible, but it's pretty easy to shoot for the middle of that range. Anyway, one problem dealt with.

Next, when I tried to fit the broad strakes on the boat, I had a devil of a time getting an acceptable overlap with the garboard. When I first fit the port side, there was only about 1/4" of overlap, not the 3/4" I expected. I'm not sure what happened here. Everything else seemed to line up just fine. It hit the marks at the mid-ship frame, and the transom. It look like it lined up with the plank lap mark on the stem but that overlap just didn't come out the way it should have. I had the same problem with the starboard side, though not as severe.

I wrote back to my contact at CLC. I was prepared to make some sort of backer board for the joint near the stem (further back, the overlap was fine). He encouraged me to give it another try, which I did.

I'd like to say that when I tried again, everything was perfect. In reality, though, I guess I'd have to say that everything was "good enough." The overlap was not 3/4", but it was more than 1/2" and that seems good enough. The joint here is backed up by the stem itself, and along most of the plank, there was a healthy overlap to fill with epoxy, so I don't think there is to much to worry about here.

Now, one last issue. In the "how to build" book, they mention that if you drive the temporary screws in to tightly, you can pull the planks out of a fair curve. I had some issues with this between station 3 and the transom. When I tightened the screws to where they felt comfortable, the plank was pulled into a bit of a hollow. This happened on both sides, but more on the port side than the starboard. I guess maybe if we had done a more accurate job with the beveling, this might not have happened. I don't know.

In any case, what I did was to use the temporary screws while I got everything lined up. Once I had the plank in place and screwed at the stem, transom, and center frame, I used "Oughtred Style" plywood clamps to hold the seam together. These clamps don't let the plank slip much when it is wood-on-wood, but with the epoxy to lubricate the joint, the planks were able to relax to where the wanted to lie.

Now you may be starting to think "tl;dr." If you are, you can be glad you stuck with it until picture time. Here are some shots at an intermediate stage.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3520_zpsb073d5ae.jpg

This is the starboard side. Most of the plywood clamps are held in position by friction where the tip of the clamp holds the seam together. You can see some of the clamps are clamped to a mold or frame to help with the twist of the plank, and to keep it laying against the molds. Here's another view:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3522_zpse9e0a4ed.jpg

Next time: Gluing planks, ordering sails, and a consult.

stromborg
06-07-2014, 11:15 AM
As you are discovering, it doesn't take much movement in the scarf joint to create a substantial change in the plank's shape. I wrestled with this on my Eun Mara too and solved it by gluing the scarfs on the boat.

D. Handron
06-07-2014, 10:46 PM
As you are discovering, it doesn't take much movement in the scarf joint to create a substantial change in the plank's shape. I wrestled with this on my Eun Mara too and solved it by gluing the scarfs on the boat.

That's certainly true, and I discovered the same with my own Eun na Mara. I don't think that's quite what happened here, though. I think I had the garboard up to high on the stem. The lower edge was just about at the "plank lap" line, but maybe that is meant to mark the center or top edge of the scarf, though that seems a bit odd.

I had to trim a good bit of material from the garboard where the stem meets the bottom. The "how to build" book mentions trimming the planks to make it easier to place the screws, so I didn't think too much of it at the time. Maybe the garboard was glued wrong, though the "notched" scarf seated well and the measurements in the handbook seemed to work out. I guess it's just one of the mysteries of boatbuilding.

On my Eun na Mara, I had a few slight misalignments, but only one that I had to cut apart and scarf again. I ended up gluing that one on the boat, and I was not too happy about how it came out. I'd been using the molds to mark the locations for the scarf, so when I tried to do it on the boat, the mold interfered with the clamping. If I find myself building another glued lapstrake boat, I'll need to think carefully about how to solve this problem.

D. Handron
06-07-2014, 11:29 PM
Day 15: Gluing the Sheerstrake, Ordering Sails, and a Consult.

While I was mulling over my difficulties in fitting the braodstrakes, I wrote to CLC to see what advice they might have. I had to do something useful while waiting for an answer, though, so I glued the sheerstrakes to length. All the measurements matched up when I aligned the sheer planks, and so I set to work.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3524_zps51fec48d.jpg

Most of the scarf joints looked like the one on the right, with nice straight glue lines. The one on the left is a little funky. Here is the full length sheetstrake, after the epoxy had cured:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3548_zps7703890f.jpg

This shot also shows the harsh lighting that makes photography difficult when the garage door is open. If some photos seem too tightly framed, I'm probably trying to avoid including any of the outdoors, which throws off the exposure. Often I close the door when I'm photographing, but sometimes it doesn't seem worth it.

The joint looks pretty good after sanding:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3574_zps0f2fece7.jpg

A couple small spots need filling. When I turned the plank over, though...

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3572_zps365166a3.jpg

Yuck. I guess something must have been out of alignment when the joint was cut. That might explain the zig-zag glue lines in the previous picture. Or maybe this sheet of ply was just that little bit thinner than the others for some reason. Well, whatever the reason, I'll need to do some more filling on this side. The other plank was better, but had similar issues.

While I was working with epoxy, I took the opportunity to fill some of the screw holes in the previous work. You can see some of the tell-tale splotches in this photo:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3538_zps01f1525d.jpg

When I ordered the kit, I didn't order the sail at the same time, because I wanted to check whether my son preferred the red or white sail. I also looked into getting a tanbark sail, like Sailor's Brother. In the end the decision was made to get a white sail. Which is on backorder. Day 15 was 5/22, and when I ordered the sail is was listed as "backordered 5/23".

A few days later when a few other things I ordered came in the mail, but no sail, I checked and the site had been updated to "backordered 6/6." On 6/6, the site had changed to "backordered 6/12." I'll have to call them on Monday, to see when I might get my sail.

Next time: Hanging the starboard broad strake.

D. Handron
06-08-2014, 08:27 PM
Day 16: Hanging the Starboard Broad Strake

Having heard back from CLC about my plank alignment issues, and having been told to go back and try again, I did just that. Some scooting and nudging, some forcing and coercing (though not really too much) had both broad strakes laying a little better. So I went ahead and glued the starboard side. Here is the result:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3542_zps2bf0f572.jpg

You can see one of the drywall screws just about at station 1/2. As I mentioned before, I removed these before the epoxy cured. I used the screws to hold the plank in place while getting it into position, then before putting on the plywood clamps, I scraped up the squeeze-out from inside the hull. Then I put on the plywood clamps, and removed the screws. The plywood clamps allow the planks to relax a bit into a more fair curve. The screws really can force the planks out of position when overtightened, but the plywood clamps don't seem to have the same tendancy.

When I set the plywood clamps, I made sure to set their heads at or just below the edge of the plank so that, after removing the screws, I could scrape the squeeze out on the outside of the hull. The broad strake overlaps the garboard by a bit, and this narrow V is meant to be filled with epoxy, so I went back along, filling the V where needed, and then went 'round once more with a squared off tongue depressor to smooth the epoxy and remove the excess.

Next time: Hanging the port broad strake and planing the garboard flat.

Sailor's Brother
06-08-2014, 09:19 PM
Day 15: Gluing the Sheerstrake, Ordering Sails, and a Consult.

While I was mulling over my difficulties in fitting the braodstrakes, I wrote to CLC to see what advice they might have. I had to do something useful while waiting for an answer, though, so I glued the sheerstrakes to length. All the measurements matched up when I aligned the sheer planks, and so I set to work.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3524_zps51fec48d.jpg

Most of the scarf joints looked like the one on the right, with nice straight glue lines. The one on the left is a little funky. Here is the full length sheetstrake, after the epoxy had cured:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3548_zps7703890f.jpg

This shot also shows the harsh lighting that makes photography difficult when the garage door is open. If some photos seem too tightly framed, I'm probably trying to avoid including any of the outdoors, which throws off the exposure. Often I close the door when I'm photographing, but sometimes it doesn't seem worth it.

The joint looks pretty good after sanding:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3574_zps0f2fece7.jpg

A couple small spots need filling. When I turned the plank over, though...

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3572_zps365166a3.jpg

Yuck. I guess something must have been out of alignment when the joint was cut. That might explain the zig-zag glue lines in the previous picture. Or maybe this sheet of ply was just that little bit thinner than the others for some reason. Well, whatever the reason, I'll need to do some more filling on this side. The other plank was better, but had similar issues.

While I was working with epoxy, I took the opportunity to fill some of the screw holes in the previous work. You can see some of the tell-tale splotches in this photo:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3538_zps01f1525d.jpg

When I ordered the kit, I didn't order the sail at the same time, because I wanted to check whether my son preferred the red or white sail. I also looked into getting a tanbark sail, like Sailor's Brother. In the end the decision was made to get a white sail. Which is on backorder. Day 15 was 5/22, and when I ordered the sail is was listed as "backordered 5/23".

A few days later when a few other things I ordered came in the mail, but no sail, I checked and the site had been updated to "backordered 6/6." On 6/6, the site had changed to "backordered 6/12." I'll have to call them on Monday, to see when I might get my sail.

Next time: Hanging the starboard broad strake.


oh wow, a shout-out on the forum... I feel so special :-)

D. Handron
06-09-2014, 11:24 PM
Day 17: Hanging the Port Side Broad Strake and Planing the Starboard Side Garboard

With the starboard side broad strake hung, it's time to move to the port side. The procedure is the same, with one exception. With all the fitting and refitting that was done on the port side, there are now several sets of screw holes in the plank edge. A screw in the wrong one could force the plank out of place. I carefully marked which holes should be used
Here is the result:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3543_zps1416a94f.jpg

With the epoxy curing, the best thing would probably be to leave the boat alone. But we couldn't do that! The garboard strakes need to be planed flush with the bottom panel. So with epoxy curing on the port side, we started work planing the starboard garboard. As with our other planing adventures, the whole family turned out. Here are the two big boys going at it:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3545_zps3010b722.jpg

My 9-year old looks angry, but I don't think he was. The two of them got into a groove, with one planing forward while the other pulled his plane back. Very seamanlike.

In the background, you can see that my Eun na Mara has been reduced to serving as a shelf. <sigh>

D. Handron
06-10-2014, 11:07 PM
Day 18: Planing the Garboard, Beveling the Broad Strakes, and Building a Spar Bench

Lots of planing today. More work on the garboards, bringing them flush with the bottom. We also worked on beveling the edges of the broad strakes, so we can hang the sheer strakes. Here is some of that work:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3553_zps592cfef9.jpg

The Ship's Baby knows the clamp is good for something around here:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3555_zpsc905b9fd.jpg

And he knows where to drill for screws:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3558_zps555282df.jpg

In addition to all that work, and with the gluing up of the planks complete, I dismantled the planking bench and began turning it into a spar bench. The 2'x4' plywood overlapped the 14" packing case for use as a planking bench, but for spar work, I cut 10" off each one, so now the top is flush with the sides. The packing case is 12'2" long, so there was a little gap at the end. Maybe I'll cover that later, for the sake of neatness.

I also made some legs to raise it up to a comfortable working height. Well, comfortable for my 9 year old. The top is 23" off the ground, and the supports I have planned for the spars will raise the work a few more inches. It's a little short for my 12 year old, and rather uncomfortable for me to work at. That's good, though, as it will keep me from doing too much of the work.

Here it is so far:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3569_zps2fb6a295.jpg

And from the other end:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3570_zps4a0c8aab.jpg

You can see that I've immediately put it to use as a place to hold tools, materials, and anything else I need to get off my workbench!

It is very sturdy, and will be a great platform for working on the keel of my Eun na Mara, and on the deck, once it is turned over... Someday.

Next time: Odds and ends

Sailor's Brother
06-11-2014, 08:36 AM
Day 18: Planing the Garboard, Beveling the Broad Strakes, and Building a Spar Bench

Lots of planing today. More work on the garboards, bringing them flush with the bottom. We also worked on beveling the edges of the broad strakes, so we can hang the sheer strakes. Here is some of that work:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3553_zps592cfef9.jpg

The Ship's Baby knows the clamp is good for something around here:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3555_zpsc905b9fd.jpg

And he knows where to drill for screws:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3558_zps555282df.jpg

In addition to all that work, and with the gluing up of the planks complete, I dismantled the planking bench and began turning it into a spar bench. The 2'x4' plywood overlapped the 14" packing case for use as a planking bench, but for spar work, I cut 10" off each one, so now the top is flush with the sides. The packing case is 12'2" long, so there was a little gap at the end. Maybe I'll cover that later, for the sake of neatness.

I also made some legs to raise it up to a comfortable working height. Well, comfortable for my 9 year old. The top is 23" off the ground, and the supports I have planned for the spars will raise the work a few more inches. It's a little short for my 12 year old, and rather uncomfortable for me to work at. That's good, though, as it will keep me from doing too much of the work.

Here it is so far:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3569_zps2fb6a295.jpg

And from the other end:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3570_zps4a0c8aab.jpg

You can see that I've immediately put it to use as a place to hold tools, materials, and anything else I need to get off my workbench!

It is very sturdy, and will be a great platform for working on the keel of my Eun na Mara, and on the deck, once it is turned over... Someday.

Next time: Odds and ends

That spar bench looks like it will be a perfect platform for standing on later :-)

nice to see the re-purposing of shipping materiels... (other than the hours of fun you get popping those little bubble things...)

D. Handron
06-11-2014, 10:58 PM
nice to see the re-purposing of shipping materiels...

Yeah, I bought 3 2'x4' sheets of plywood at the orange store, and I had some 2x4 and 2x6 scraps around for legs, but that sturdy box made it all a snap.



(other than the hours of fun you get popping those little bubble things...)

The bubbles are fun, but the styrofoam peanuts are always a nuisance.

D. Handron
06-11-2014, 11:40 PM
Day 19: A Lot of Little Jobs

We didn't achieve any major milestones today, but we did accomplish quite a bit. We continued beveling the broad strakes, and planing the garboard flush with the bottom. With the kids, doing a little bit every day works better than trying to power through it, and besides, We're not quite ready for the next steps anyway. I took a random orbit sander to the glued scarfs in the sheer strake. I showed those once before, but here they are again:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3571_zpsea1f76f4.jpg

The one on the left is ugly, but it's not as glue starved as it looks. I'm not sure what happened to cause this. It looks much nicer on the other side.

I finished up the spar bench, with supports to hold the work. They are just 2x4 scraps with a notch cut into them, which are screwed to the plywood top. Here they are with the boom ready for work:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3649_zps7ed3169e.jpg

I seem to have lost track of when I marked and sawed the profile of the boom, but here you can see it is marked for 8-siding. I've seen measurements for marking gauges before, but the "how to build" book describes a more geometric approach. Never one to let my high school geometry go to waste, I got out my compass and went to work:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3575_zps20ae34d9.jpg

Shamefully, I did not erect the perpenduculars by construction. I used a square. The square is just larger than the side of the mast blank. Using dividers, I transferred the measurements to a scrap of wood, and drilled four holes for two dowels and two pencils.

The final thing we did today was to begin fitting the sheer strake, but we ran into some trouble with that. The three temporary frames have a little notch giving the location of the sheer. But the notch in station 1/2 seems to be out of place. It took a while to realize this, and there was some consternation when the plank, set into the notches, would not lie correctly, and overlapped the broad strake by 3 inches at the stem. "Maybe I have it upside down," I thought. Nope. "Maybe I've mixed up the fore and aft ends." Nope. "Both?" No.

At some point I noticed that if I ignored the notch at station 1/2, everything worked better. "So, where does the sheer really belong?" thought I. measuring from the plans, 17 1/2" above the waterline. Well, where is that on the mold?

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3546_zpsfd8a8727.jpg

Well, it looks like that notch has to go. I started to cut one off, and then thought, "Maybe I should check before I do this." And so I ended the day by sending an email to CLC.

Next time: Fitting the sheer strakes.

D. Handron
06-12-2014, 01:56 PM
A few days ago I complained a little bit about the sail being back ordered at the WoodenBoat Store. Well the very next morning I found a shipping notification in my email inbox, and yesterday afternoon the UPS man brought a package to my door. The sail had arrived, and it looks great. Now all I need are some spars to lace it to, and a boat to hoist it in.

D. Handron
06-12-2014, 09:05 PM
Day 20: Fitting the Starboard Sheer Strake

The fellow I've been conversing with at CLC has told me that when he builds from the kit, he let's the plank run over that notch on the station 1/2 frame. So I went ahead and cut it off. I had treated myself to a ryoba saw the last time I was at Rockler (http://www.rockler.com/takuma-240mm-ryoba-saw). I had intended to break it out when we trimmed the planks flush with the transom, but it seemed like the right tool for this job. It worked like a charm.

After that, the sheer strakes fell right into place. So I finished beveling the broad strakes, and fit the starboard sheer strake, drilling holes for the bronze screws at the center frame, stem and transom.

Sorry for the lack of pictures lately. I guess I got caught up in the actual building of the boat. I'll work on taking more pictures as I go.

Next time: Hanging the starboard sheer strake.

D. Handron
06-13-2014, 09:50 PM
Day 21: Hanging the Starboard Sheer Strake

With the Sheer strake screwed in place, I could finally mark the locations of the plank lands at the stem, and plane the gains. This is different from the way I did the gains for the garboard/broad strake lap. There I did it the way I've done it in the past, with less than stellar results. This time, I used the method from the "how to build" book. I can't believe I didn't take any pictures of this either!

With the sheer strake screwed in place, I traced the top edge of the sheer strake onto the broad strake. I also reached underneath to trace the lower edge of the broad strake onto the sheer strake. Then I removed the sheer strake, and tacked a batten above the line I traced on the braod strake. This became the guide for the rebate plane to follow, instead of trying to use the fence on the plane. Like before, I planed part of the gain on each strake. The half of the gain on the sheer strake was done the same way, but on the bench, rather than floating in mid-air.

How did it work? Well, the result is better than before. I didn't like working this way very much, though. Working on the bench it was a balance between keeping the plane flush against the batten and no pushing so hard that the brads pull out and let the batten move. Working on the boat, it was all that and more. Well, it's done now.

After that, It was time to hang the plank. I didn't use any temporary screws this time, just the permanent screws at the stem, mid-ship frame and transom, and the plywood clamps in between. After all the fitting and refitting of the port broad strake, I have enough screw holes to fill to last me through my next two boats! Everything went smoothly. The result:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3576_zps465bd7da.jpg

Next time: fitting the port side sheer strake.

D. Handron
06-14-2014, 08:36 AM
Day 22: Preparing to Hang the Port Sheer Strake

We're coming up on a big milestone, and I'm anxious to get there. I knew I wouldn't be able to finish the planking today, but I wanted to be able to be able to mix epoxy first thing when work started the next day. This meant: planing bevels, a first fit of the plank, getting the permanent screws in place, marking the plank lands at the stem, plank off, planing gains, both on and off the boat, and a final dry fit. Again, not much in the way of photos of these events.

We did do some sanding on the hull. I've been going back to fill screw holes and such, using left over from gluing planks. We took a random orbit sander to some of these. It is very satisfying to see the epoxy "splotch" become a subtle round dot on the hull. Here is my 9-year old at work:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3577_zpscef19114.jpg

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3578_zps74bd1da2.jpg

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3580_zps1cf69b70.jpg

In this last photo, you can see all the screw holes that I made in the port side broad strake. It's like Swiss cheese, there at the edge.

Next time: Hanging the last plank.

D. Handron
06-15-2014, 06:15 AM
Day 23:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3583_zpsa4e2ee9c.jpg

D. Handron
06-15-2014, 07:57 AM
Yesterday was, apparently, "National Get Outdoors Day" here in the U.S. In keeping with that, we took the family to Moraine State Park, which surrounds Lake Arthur. This is where I expect we'll do most of our sailing once Falcon is launched.

They had a whole bunch of activities set up, many of which were interesting, and all of them free. It was a fun day. One of the activities was kayaking, which the boys and I did. It was sort of 'stand in line for 20 minutes, then paddle for 10.' It was fun as far as it went, but seeing all the sails out on the lake has made me more determined than ever to get out on the water this summer. And I was pretty determined before.

It was a beautiful day, and a lot of boats were out. I saw a couple lug sails, which I thought was interesting. All so tantalizingly close. Bound, indeed, is boatless man.

D. Handron
06-16-2014, 01:15 PM
Day 24: Filling and Sanding, Trimming the Plank Ends

Well, here she is:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3588_zps52a5209e.jpg

Time to fill all those screw holes, and scrape and sand all the excess epoxy. But first, I'll trim the planks at the bow. I used a powerplane, and then a random orbit sander when the planks got close to the stem, to smooth the planks. My goal was to bring the plank ends just flush with the stem, but not to remove any of the material from the stem. I did a pretty good job, I think.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3589_zps5d07f433.jpg

Oh, one thing you might want to keep in mind: Don't let the screws get too far forward on the stem. They will come back to bite you.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3586_zpsa7059cfb.jpg

Actually, the screws seem to have been on the receiving end of most of the biting. That can't have done my planer blades any good, though. We also trimmed the planks at the transom:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3604_zps8fb37843.jpg

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3608_zps6fe9a7f3.jpg

I put packing tape on the transom so it wouldn't get chewed up by the saw teeth. Also some tape along the planks prevented some splintering. This was one of the tasks I'd been looking forward to, and I hardly got to do any of it. The boys were clamoring to have another turn. We may have to build another, just to trim the planks again!

In the end I have to get on the the scraping, sanding, filling treadmill. After an afternoon, things are looking much nicer:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3623_zps71a63fa5.jpg

Next time: More sanding and filling, and the outer stem.

D. Handron
06-17-2014, 02:07 PM
Day 25: Fitting the Outer Stem, and More Sanding and Filling

Well, more sanding and filling today gets the hull looking pretty good.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3624_zps942fbe07.jpg

Now it's time to fit the outer stem. I screwed in place first, taking the screw locations from the plan set. I marked the extend of the bevel on the front face of the stem, leaving enough of a flat to accommodate the brass half-oval strip. Then I went at it with a block plane. The grain in the laminations was a bit inconvenient, so I switched to a random orbit sander with 60 grit paper after a while. After things got pretty close to where I wanted, I decided it was time to glue it in place.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3626_zpsa2a48559.jpg

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3627_zps739c79db.jpg

Thereby making another mess that needs scraping and sanding. Ugh. Back on the treadmill.

The stem will need a little more shaping, too. But I was doing all that work on the boat. The outer stem itself is lightweight and awkward to hold in any conventional way. It might have been better to do an initial pass with the band saw before using hand tools, but that would have had it's own problems. In any case, it's part of the boat now!

Sailor's Brother
06-17-2014, 06:28 PM
Day 25: Fitting the Outer Stem, and More Sanding and Filling

Well, more sanding and filling today gets the hull looking pretty good.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3624_zps942fbe07.jpg

Now it's time to fit the outer stem. I screwed in place first, taking the screw locations from the plan set. I marked the extend of the bevel on the front face of the stem, leaving enough of a flat to accommodate the brass half-oval strip. Then I went at it with a block plane. The grain in the laminations was a bit inconvenient, so I switched to a random orbit sander with 60 grit paper after a while. After things got pretty close to where I wanted, I decided it was time to glue it in place.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3626_zpsa2a48559.jpg

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3627_zps739c79db.jpg

Thereby making another mess that needs scraping and sanding. Ugh. Back on the treadmill.

The stem will need a little more shaping, too. But I was doing all that work on the boat. The outer stem itself is lightweight and awkward to hold in any conventional way. It might have been better to do an initial pass with the band saw before using hand tools, but that would have had it's own problems. In any case, it's part of the boat now!


This is pretty much where I had my biggest screw-up... I cut the outer stem too short... I'd recommend waiting until the last moment for that...

D. Handron
06-18-2014, 12:52 PM
This is pretty much where I had my biggest screw-up... I cut the outer stem too short... I'd recommend waiting until the last moment for that...

That's right, I remember reading about that. Your skeg actually split near the glue line, right? I'll definitely try to avoid that!

D. Handron
06-18-2014, 01:10 PM
Day 26: The Turnover!

There are no pictures of the turning itself, as everyone had a hand in the process. But here she is:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3637_zps2cd114d7.jpg

I couldn't resist setting the thwarts in place, just to see what it would look like. The thwarts are just as they were shipped, with the ends cut at an angle. They are a little over length, though, and will need to be scribed to the correct shape, and beveled. And don't worry, you didn't miss any posts about the centerboard trunk. That's just the parts for the trunk taped together. That is still on my to-do list. The ship's baby took a few moments to dance a jig

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3630_zps1992b420.jpg

and then I took the thwarts out and started sanding the interior laps. I got the port side done before calling it a day.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3639_zps57996071.jpg

Bonus photo:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3638_zps5ccea523.jpg

Next time: More scraping and sanding, begin fitting out the interior.

D. Handron
06-19-2014, 07:37 PM
Day 27: Scraping and Sanding, Breasthook, and Quarter Knees

Well, I've finished scraping and sanding the interior plank laps.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3645_zpsa5acbf22.jpg

She still needs more filling and sanding, but I'll do that in small doses. Right now, I'm keen to start working on more interesting things. The next things to tackle are the breasthook and quarter knees. Here they are as they come from the factory:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3633_zps6e3e2876.jpg

And after "unwrapping" them:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3634_zpsf36610cf.jpg

The plans show full size patterns for these pieces, and indicate a bevel angle for each edge. The quarter knees fit perfectly in place, as delivered. The two halves of the breasthook need to be beveled where they meet the stem:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3647_zpsb9db76bd.jpg

I used the ryoba saw to make these cuts. Then I turned to the band saw to make the second cut. Of course this doesn't work at all! The end of the cut is angled in such a way that to finish the cut on one side, you saw into the work piece on the other side. Which you don't notice until it's too late. So you have to go back to the ryoba saw for the other side. Oh, well. Not the first mistake in this boat, nor the last, I'm sure.

The two pieces are cut slightly oversize, so they have to be sawn so that they meet on the center line. After that, things are looking pretty good.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3651_zps9b546fca.jpg

You can see that I have locations marked out for some screws. That will have to wait for tomorrow.

Next time: Screwing in the breasthook, sawing out the boom, finishing the spar bench.

Larks
06-19-2014, 08:24 PM
Looking good, I've been enjoying watching this little gem come together. Do you have a name for her yet?

Sailor's Brother
06-19-2014, 10:25 PM
Day 27: Scraping and Sanding, Breasthook, and Quarter Knees

Well, I've finished scraping and sanding the interior plank laps.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3645_zpsa5acbf22.jpg

She still needs more filling and sanding, but I'll do that in small doses. Right now, I'm keen to start working on more interesting things. The next things to tackle are the breasthook and quarter knees. Here they are as they come from the factory:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3633_zps6e3e2876.jpg

And after "unwrapping" them:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3634_zpsf36610cf.jpg

The plans show full size patterns for these pieces, and indicate a bevel angle for each edge. The quarter knees fit perfectly in place, as delivered. The two halves of the breasthook need to be beveled where they meet the stem:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3647_zpsb9db76bd.jpg

I used the ryoba saw to make these cuts. Then I turned to the band saw to make the second cut. Of course this doesn't work at all! The end of the cut is angled in such a way that to finish the cut on one side, you saw into the work piece on the other side. Which you don't notice until it's too late. So you have to go back to the ryoba saw for the other side. Oh, well. Not the first mistake in this boat, nor the last, I'm sure.

The two pieces are cut slightly oversize, so they have to be sawn so that they meet on the center line. After that, things are looking pretty good.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3651_zps9b546fca.jpg

You can see that I have locations marked out for some screws. That will have to wait for tomorrow.

Next time: Screwing in the breasthook, sawing out the boom, finishing the spar bench.


Wow, that's looking awesome, very clean and neat inside. way to go

D. Handron
06-20-2014, 11:19 PM
Wow, that's looking awesome, very clean and neat inside. way to go

Thanks, S.B. There's a lot that the camera doesn't show... Overall, though, I'm pretty pleased with how things are going.

D. Handron
06-21-2014, 12:05 AM
Day 28: Screw Breasthook in Place, Saw out Boom, and Finish the Spar Bench

Well, I've got the breasthook screwed into place now.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3653_zps77e1c455.jpg

The blue clamp keeps things lined up correctly. Without it, the two halves want to be a little out of alignment. To make it easier to get the alignment right, I cut a scrap of wood to the correct angle...

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3656_zpsadee8af1.jpg

... and clamp everything in place.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3657_zps309e1578.jpg

When I glue the two halves together, I'll have to be careful to put a piece of plastic between the breasthook and the scrap!

Today, I also sawed out the boom. I didn't get a good before picture, but in the kit, the spars come as laminations of 3 or 4 layers of sitka spruce. They're solid, square in section; just a bit larger than the maximum finished diameter, and a couple inches over length. The plans show diameters at the ends, and at one or two points along the length.

I marked out a center line, and marked the diameters at the appropriate points. Then the kids helped me spring a batten along the marks, and trace the line to cut. The first attempt was not good. The batten we used was not sufficiently straight and uniform. In the end, we used the material supplied for the guardrail, clear straight grained mahogany. This proved to be perfect.

So on one face, we marked two cut lines, then I sawed them out on the band saw. Then we marked out two more cut lines on one of the newly exposed faces. These are not straight, there is a curve, but not too severe.

After the boom is cut out - "4-sided" - we marked the guide lines for 8-siding the boom. Finally, I screwed the supports in place on the spar bench. Here is everything ready to go:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3650_zps8f1cb33b.jpg

Next time: spar work.

timo4352
06-21-2014, 07:23 AM
Man! Slow down - I can't keep up!
The kit goes together fast. Looking really good. Y>

D. Handron
06-21-2014, 12:48 PM
Man! Slow down - I can't keep up!
The kit goes together fast. Looking really good. Y>

I've been working pretty hard on this, at least two or three hours a day, I'd say, and sometimes more. The kit really does speed things along. I've been making use of some down time at work while the kids are still in school. The "family" nature of the project also makes it easier to justify working when everyone is around.

Also, I'm really just excited about the prospect of going sailing again. It's been too long.

It you'd like a more balanced view of my boatbuilding tempo, you can look up the thread for the Eun na Mara I'm building, which I haven't posted to in several months. I started work on that in 2000, and I hope to get her turned over this summer. If I can get the Shellback finished in good order.

D. Handron
06-21-2014, 01:28 PM
Day 29: Working on the Spars

Today we started planing the boom to an 8-sided shape.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3659_zps7ff17f55.jpg

On the bench next to it is what will become the mast. We did a lot of work planing, but it basically all looks just like this, so only one picture.

We also marked and cut out the yard. As before, we marked a center line, and and the diameter at the marks noted in the plans.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3663_zps61d482e5.jpg

You can see the plans call for 1 5/8" diameter 4' 8 1/2" from the end. So the dividers are set for half of that, 13/16". I think those measurements are actually for the boom, not the yard, but you get the idea.

Then a brad marks each of these points, and a batten is laid against them and traced. This give the line to cut.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3665_zps04d2154e.jpg

Then over to the band saw. The waste is cut off the sides, then we mark again to cut the waste at the top and bottom. I drilled the hole in the spar while it was still square. Lacking a drill press, I had to eyeball it. It seems like it went through pretty straight.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3667_zpsc9860c2b.jpg

Next Time: More spar work.

stromborg
06-21-2014, 05:25 PM
If using hand tools I really like to use a spokeshave to rough in the faces of the spars, finishing up with a low angle block plane. Faced with the prospect of hand planing eight spars for my Eun Mara I sprung for a power plane, much better. I still finished up with the block plane, much more control even at very small cutting depths.

D. Handron
06-22-2014, 03:40 PM
If using hand tools I really like to use a spokeshave to rough in the faces of the spars, finishing up with a low angle block plane. Faced with the prospect of hand planing eight spars for my Eun Mara I sprung for a power plane, much better. I still finished up with the block plane, much more control even at very small cutting depths.

Really? Does the spokeshave bring it down faster than a bench plane? I don't have a spokeshave, but I'd like a reason to get one...

When I get to the spars for my Eun na Mara, I will definitely bring out the power plane. I've been tempted to get it out for this job, but haven't so far. I want to bring the kids into this build as much as possible, and my son specifically mentioned wanting to make the mast as an interest. They're not ready for the power plane - I'm not always sure that I am! If I'm going to tell them that the hand plane is the way to do the job, I should be willing to do that too, I figure. The boom has gone pretty quickly. The mast is taking a lot longer, but we're getting there.

stromborg
06-22-2014, 04:17 PM
I felt like the spokeshave was faster.

D. Handron
06-22-2014, 05:24 PM
I felt like the spokeshave was faster.

Well, I may have to stop at Rockler on my way home from work tomorrow.

D. Handron
06-22-2014, 06:03 PM
Day 30: More Spar Work

Spar work continued today. We marked and sawed out two sides of the boom. This was the same as for the other spars, but bigger.

Marking the diameters:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3670_zpsa3f72b86.jpg

Getting the band saw set up:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3671_zps9626daa5.jpg

I use two roller supports to help with long pieces. It took a little effort to find just the right place for them, so that the boom would be balanced at all times. It also required a little straightening up of the shop, so that the stands could be put in those places!

The blank for the mast is just a bit larger than the maximum diameter of the mast. My band saw took a nice thin slice off the edge. Not quite paper thin, but a pretty fine cut.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3673_zpsadfe670e.jpg

You will notice that I've only shown one of the offcuts. There's probably a reason for that...

I cut the mast to length while there were still two square sides. I could have used the miter saw to do this, but I don't have a permanent set up for it, and it's a hassle to get it out and set up for just a couple cuts, so I used the ryoba saw again. It's definitely making itself worthwhile. I've used a trick I picked up watching "The Woodwright's Shop." I use a knife to scribe the cut line. Then carve a little groove on the offcut side. Just a millimeter or so wide, and not even that deep. That makes a path for the saw to follow, and keeps the cut clean. Start at a corner, and work the saw kerf down one side, and then the other. Then start sawing straight in from the corner. The saw wants to follow the cuts you already made in the faces. It's easier to do than to describe. This technique is shown in many of the episodes. If you watch for a few weeks you'll see it done. Here is the setup:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3676_zps94b56316.jpg

We also worked some more on 8-siding the boom. The ship's baby is very enthusiastic about this job, which is clearly very important. He knows the shavings are the plane go together. Sometimes he pulls the shavings out of the plane. Sometimes he puts them back. He's a great helper.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3678_zpscf61dae2.jpg

Next time: More filling and sanding, and yet more spar work.

D. Handron
06-23-2014, 02:38 PM
Day 31: Filling the Plank Lands, and Yet More Spar Work

Today I put a fillet of epoxy in the interior plank lands, to (eventually) make a smoother interior surface. Here is the result:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3674_zps77473342.jpg

This picture is from a day or two later, and I've already scraped and sanded the seams forward of the midship frame. Here's a picture from the bow looking aft.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3675_zps4fea5f42.jpg

You can clearly see that I still have to fill the screw holes on the interior. I used a countersink bit in the screw holes so that the epoxy filler would leave uniform circular marks. Not really necessary, but I thought that would be a little nicer with the bright finish. The seams will need a little more attention, too.

But not today. We finished 8-siding the boom today, which was nice. We also cut the remaining two sides of the mast. That is the end of the band saw work on the spars. The rest is planing and sanding to bring them down to 8-sided, 16 sided and then round.

Next time: sanding and filling, again.

D. Handron
06-24-2014, 11:15 PM
Day 32: Still More Sanding and Filling

I spent a day away from the boat between days 31 and 32.

I'm afraid I don't have any pictures to post today, because, let's face it, it's not really that photogenic. I finished sanding the interior plank plaps, and I went back to fill the screw holes with a fairing compound made by mixing "phenolic microballoons" into the epoxy. I don't think these are available on System Three's website anymore. I ordered some of their current offering - glass microspheres or something like that. The microballoons are a sort of reddish brown color that looks nice with the wood. the glass mocrospheres are white. I haven't had a chance to try using them, yet.

I think that's all the scraping and sanding, and sanding and filling that I can stand for a while. I'll have to shift back to more interesting things.

Next Time: Working on the quarter knees.

D. Handron
06-24-2014, 11:19 PM
I felt like the spokeshave was faster. I did get myself a spokeshave. I'll need to work with it a bit to get the hang of it. Sometimes it makes a nice spiral shaving, but other times, it just skitters along. When it works, though, it does seem to work faster than the plane.

Rich Jones
06-25-2014, 06:51 AM
I'm enjoying the thread, especially with your children getting involved. I've got some very old pictures of my three year old son "helping" with one of my builds.
I find spar building to be very satisfying. Something about taking a square piece of wood to round with nothing but a handplane gives me great joy. Well, a handplane once my power saw has gotten it to eight sided. Some folks here have built themselves spar lathes to speed things up when multiple larger spars are needed. You might want to consider that for your larger boat. Check out John Hartmann's "An Ilur in Vermont" thread for that.

D. Handron
06-25-2014, 11:50 PM
Day 33: Sanding Screw Holes, and Preparing the Breasthook and Quarter Knees for the Inwales

Those screw holes I filled yesterday? Well, I sanded them today. I think they need another round of filling and sanding; there were some places where the filler was below the level of the plywood. But that will wait for another day.

Some days I go out to the boat with no real plan. Sometimes these days are unproductive, without any focus. Other times I end up doing the repetitive work that is available in abundance - filling and sanding or planing the mast, though I've been saving most of the spar work for the boys. Occasionally, though, I discover I've made some real progress without realizing it was happening. That was the case today.

I was looking at fitting the breasthook and quarter knees, and thinking about how to integrate them with the inwale. The plans don't include the inwale, and these parts are cut to the patterns in the plans. They need to be modified so that the inwale can run into them. I started sketching on the parts, and when I found what I liked, I scribed it with a knife:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3813_zps9de48085.jpg

When I do this type of hand work, I usually scribe with a knife to get a good crisp edge, then trace it with a pencil, so that I can see it better. That's what you see here.

Next I use the "Woodwright's Shop" technique, which I described once before. I pare away a little on the waste side of the line, to make a groove which guides the saw teeth.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3814_zpsebebc3e5.jpg

Then start sawing into a corner, working the kerf down one side from the corner, then down the other. After doing that for the four corners in this cut, saw down to the lines. The saw will easily follow the kerfs you've made in the edges. Here the waste has almost been released:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3817_zps1d7e36f7.jpg

Just a little more, and the waste comes out:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3819_zps3e84fd00.jpg

I've traced the edges with a pencil, to make them more visible in this photo. The faces need to be cleaned up a bit with a rasp, but they will be buried in epoxy, so I won't knock myself out.

Anyway, that was a satisfying bit of work, and moved things along noticeably.

Next Time: More epoxy fillets, and gluing the breasthook.

D. Handron
06-26-2014, 12:16 AM
I'm enjoying the thread, especially with your children getting involved. I've got some very old pictures of my three year old son "helping" with one of my builds.
I find spar building to be very satisfying. Something about taking a square piece of wood to round with nothing but a handplane gives me great joy. Well, a handplane once my power saw has gotten it to eight sided. Some folks here have built themselves spar lathes to speed things up when multiple larger spars are needed. You might want to consider that for your larger boat. Check out John Hartmann's "An Ilur in Vermont" thread for that.

Thanks, Rich. I've been following that thread, and noted his spar lathe with interest. I'm definitely considering the spars for the Shellback as a trial run. How easy is it to round the spars by 8-siding, 16-siding and so on. It seems like the spar lathe would be a good way to get a nice round mast. I've never done any turning before, though. That seems like jumping in at the deep end.

Then, I'm also debating birdsmouth vs box section vs solid. After this smaller trial run, I'll have a better idea of what I'll want to do with the Eun na Mara.

Incidentally, I noticed a lot of familiar places in the Ilur thread. I drive past Lake Bomesean in the winter, on my way to Mad River Glen - across Rt 4 from New York, then up 30 to Rt 7 and 17.

Rich Jones
06-26-2014, 08:43 AM
Rounding a spar by hand is satisfying, but has to be done very exactly. If you let it get away from you, you'll never get it back to round. Don't ask me how I know this, just that I never let anyone near my spars with a pair of calipers!

What you see from Rt. 4 is the "skinny" end of the Lake Bomoseen down by the marina. That goes for about a few hundred yards and then opens up into a nice sized lake. Not too big, not too small.

Next winter, just keep going straight on Rt. 4 to Rutland and we can meet together at Killington or Okemo. Great skiing!

D. Handron
06-27-2014, 10:02 AM
Day 34: More Epoxy Work, and Gluing the Breasthook

A couple days ago I put a fillet of epoxy in the interior plank lands, but I ran out of epoxy and time with a little bit left to do in the bow. Today I finished those up. It made sense, since I was already mixing epoxy to glue the two halves of the breasthook together. "Mix once, glue twice." Isn't that how the old adage goes? Something like that, anyway.

The "how to build book" doesn't mention it, and the kit doesn't include it, but the plans show a 1/4" bronze rod embedded in the joint in the breasthook. I don't have a local source for threaded bronze rod, but I got a 6" stainless steel rod from the Blue Box store. (Actually, now that I think of it, we have a West Marine. They might have had the bronze rod. Too Late Now!) I only needed 2 1/2", but the stainless steel yielded to a hack saw without too much difficulty.

I drilled into one side of the breasthook - tentatively, carefully - but the bit never did break through the top surface. Whew! Then I used a dowel center to line up the whole on the other side:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3820_zps3d834d14.jpg

The dowel centers are easy, fast, and accurate, but my drill bit was not. It wandered some, but I was able to open up the hole with a larger bit, and then everything worked out all right.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3821_zps9465632c.jpg

Then slather the joint with eopxy, making sure to fill up the holes, and join the pieces together, with the threaded rod in place. Then screw and clamp in the boat to cure. I made sure to line the stem with packing tape, so the epoxy wouldn't stick to it. I also put some tape along the bottom of the joint, so my clamping block wouldn't stick either.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3829_zps7feb8952.jpg

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3830_zpse830164a.jpg

That looks pretty good to me.

Next time: Thwarts and guardrails.

D. Handron
06-27-2014, 05:50 PM
Day 35: Preparing for the Guardrails and Fitting the Bow Thwart

After the epoxy had cured in the breasthook, I took it out of the boat, and gave it a bit of a sanding, slightly rounding the top surface. After removing the tape from the stem, I put it back in the boat, just to see how it looked:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3831_zps7ae67efc.jpg

Not too bad at all. In preparing for the guardrails, I also did some more shaping of the stem. You can see that some of the epoxy mess has been sanded away where the stem meets the sheet strake. Unfortunatley, I got a little too aggresive in sanding here, and I made the front face of the stem too narrow. I'm not sure it's still wide enough to support the brass half-oval that is meant to finish off the stem. I'm not sure what to do about that. I could end the half-oval lower on the stem, or I could fill in behind it with epoxy. I have some offcuts from the spars that are the same wood as the stem (sitka spruce!). Can I fill in with that somehow? I don't know...

I also started fitting the bow thwart. The thwarts provided with the kit are cypress, 1" by 8". They are cut on an angle to fit the sides of the hull, but they are not beveled. There is a little bit of extra material, too. I started by scribing the cut line on the thwart:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3832_zps67959d42.jpg

After that, I used a bevel gauge to find the correct bevel and, as in the "how to build" book, cut the bevel at the band saw.

The boat is also a good place for bedtime stories:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3823_zps58175800.jpg

Three Wise Men of Gotham
Went to sea in a bowl.
And if the bowl had been stronger
My song had been longer.

Next time: Laying out locations for the inwale spacer blocks.

D. Handron
06-28-2014, 10:32 PM
Day 36: Laying Out the Inwale Spacer Blocks

Today, I realized that I have been putting off a job that really needed doing. In the "how to build" book, fitting the thwarts comes after finishing with the breasthook, quarter knees, and guardrail. I realized that fitting the guardrail will likely change the shape of the hull slightly, and that this should be finished before fitting the thwarts. There are some questions that need to be answered before this can be done.

Since I didn't know the answers to these questions, I did something else that I knew needed doing. I started trimming the center frame to accept the inwale. First I clamped a scrap piece of 2x4 against the sheer to support the ryoba saw

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3833_zpsac41f6ad.jpg

and then I went to work

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3834_zps02df54a5.jpg

After trimming off the excess, there was a tedious bit of marking out the thickness of the spacer blocks, and their "sided" dimension, and carefully sawing away a corner of the frame, so the inwale will lie nicely against the remainder, just as if it were an extra spacer block. That mostly went without difficulty, until the saw seemed to stop making progress. And what is that noise?... Oh. Right. Better get a hack saw.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3835_zps789ffc43.jpg

I thought I was so clever when I placed that screw where the guardrail would cover it. I forgot about this bit, though. Oh, well.

At this point, I realized I was still just putting off the inevitable.

Let me say now, that I was surprised by the number of permanent screws included with the kit. Reading Iain Oughtred's "Clinker Plywood Boatbuilding Manual" left me with the impression that hardly any screws are required, and those are mainly to relieve anxiety than to give strength to the hull. The kit specifies 50 screws for joining "plank to guardrail" and 40 screws for "inwale to guardrail." There is no indication in the plans or book about the spacing of these screws. The plans don't show an inwale at all, and the book describes the process of fitting the inwale, but doesn't give specifics about the size of the spacer blocks, or their spacing. The kit provides inwales that are over length by about 2', and an extra 4' of material of the same dimension. This is meant for the spacer blocks.

Before I can attach the guardrail, I need to know where to put the screws, and before I can figure that out, I need to know where the inwale spacer blocks will be. I don't want to interfere with them or their screws. So before I can go any further, I need to lay out the locations of the inwale spacer blocks.

Okay: 40 screws, one each through the breasthook and quarter knee, port and starboard. So 36 screws are left, 18 for each side. I figure 1 1/4" is a good length for the spacer blocks. Eighteen 1 1/4" spacer blocks per side, and giving an allowance for the saw kerf, adds up to... much less than the material provided. Okay, no problem. So I just have to lay out their positions.

This I did by trial and error, using dividers. I end up with 8 blocks aft of the center frame, and 10 forward. They are spaced about 4 1/2" on center. There is about 1/8" difference in this spacing between fore and aft. Nice.

Next Time: Fitting the guardrails.

heavyweather
06-29-2014, 11:28 AM
Looking good.
How are the spacer blocks shaped in the book? I like to lengthen them with a forstner drill to get them a concave shape. Saw that somewhere on the net. It works best by drilling the holes first and cutting the blocks out with the band saw or table saw. Did that on our last boat and it looks so much nicer than the blunt blocks.

I believe all those screws just add weight, the rod in the stemplate too. Where should all that stress come from in that little boat and why shouldn't the epoxy be enough to handle that? Just wondering if all my boats will come apart soon...only 16 stainless 16mm in the rubrail on the Mippet.

heavyweather
06-29-2014, 11:32 AM
http://www.michneboat.com/Gunwales.htm
and here
http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthread.php?156630-Finishing-a-spaced-gunwale
That's what I was trying to describe in poor English :)

D. Handron
06-30-2014, 05:01 AM
Looking good.
How are the spacer blocks shaped in the book? I like to lengthen them with a forstner drill to get them a concave shape. Saw that somewhere on the net. It works best by drilling the holes first and cutting the blocks out with the band saw or table saw. Did that on our last boat and it looks so much nicer than the blunt blocks.


I've seen that, too, and I like the look. The book shows the spacer blocks cut square, and recommends using a round file to give some shape to the ends after it is all together. I just cut them square. Another time on another boat, I would try to make the rounded ends with a forstner bit.

One factor in my decision is that this is meant to be my kid's boat, and their first boat - something that can be improved upon. Another consideration is the additional time that the rounded ends would require. The deciding factor, though, is that I don't have a working drill press.

D. Handron
06-30-2014, 05:14 AM
I believe all those screws just add weight, the rod in the stemplate too. Where should all that stress come from in that little boat and why shouldn't the epoxy be enough to handle that? Just wondering if all my boats will come apart soon...only 16 stainless 16mm in the rubrail on the Mippet.

I think you are probably right. The only thing I can think is that the plans show a date of "Jan 1989." Maybe 25 years ago all the benefits of epoxy were not fully understood. For the most part, I've been including all the specified screws. I figure if I don't and somewhere down the line there is some problem, boy wouldn't I feel like an idiot. They all came with the kit, so it's no additional expense.

The screws also help give the pieces a precise position when epoxying. I can clamp things in place while dry, and screw them. Then when I glue them together, I don't have to worry about everything sliding around. The screws bring everything right back where it was. Admittedly, I'm using many more screws than are necessary for that purpose.

D. Handron
06-30-2014, 05:46 AM
Day 37: Fitting the Guardrails

Today, I fit the guardrails, and screwed them in place. This was not hard. Just a few hand clamps to hold things in place, and then drilling and screwing. The only hard thing was figuring out where to put the screws. I had written to CLC when I was mulling over the placement of the spacer blocks, and my contact commented that he doesn't use any screws for the inwale, just epoxy. On his advice, I'm content to skip those screws.

My plan had been to screw the inwales through the spacer blocks and plank and into the guardrail, and to screw through the plank and into the guardrail between the spacer blocks. My first thought now is that I can hide the plank-to-guardrail screws under the spacer blocks. I didn't end up doing that, though.

The guardrail is 5/8" thick, and the planking is 1/4" The screws provided for this application are 3/4". That leaves 1/8" between the tip of the screw and the surface of the guardrail. That seems fine. But the head of the screw is rounded over, so it would need to be countersunk deeper than normal, say another 1/16". That leaves only 1/16" between the tip of the screw and the surface. Not much margin for error if, say, the collar on the drill bit slips. It makes sanding for refinishing a bit more of a concern, too.

In the end, I left the screws between the spacer block locations. In retrospect, this was probably a mistake. Instead, I ought to have used a forstner bit to create a little hollow on the back side of the spacer blocks to accommodate the screw heads. Or something like that. In any case, here they are:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3852_zps801833e3.jpg

If you look carefully, you can see the locations of the spacer blocks marked between the screws with an "|X|." Here's another shot

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3853_zps7cc1fd3f.jpg

The light caught this at just the right angle to highlight the cascade of sawdust beneath each screw hole. I though that was sort of neat.

Next time: Tapering the guardrails.


Edited for spelling.

D. Handron
06-30-2014, 09:41 PM
Day 38: Tapering the Guardrails (Bow)

I decided to taper the guardrails at the bow and stern. At the bow they will taper to 3/4 of their full height (sided?) and 1/2 of their full thickness (molded?). This entails removing 5/16" in each direction. I used the inwale material as a batten to draw the taper.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3856_zps81b8f47e.jpg

After sawing to the this line on the band saw, I planed them smooth.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3857_zpsbdcaaef8.jpg

One of the guardrails had these two marks, they look like nail marks, but who knows.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3858_zps90d70f82.jpg

I meant to make sure they were hidden on the inside. It would have been easy to do... if only I had remembered at the critical time to check. Oh, well. It will add character. Right?

Next time: Tapering the guardrails at the stern and trimming the starboard side center frame.

D. Handron
07-01-2014, 11:13 PM
Day 39: Tapering Guardrails and Trimming Frames

I tapered the guardrails at the stern, only in the molded dimension, the sided dimension stayed the same. (I think I got that right - molding sticks out from the wall...) I used the same approach as at the bow, with similar results. Here is the taper as seen on the boat:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3867_zpsbdb81645.jpg


I also trimmed the starboard side center frame:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3859_zpsfde76f41.jpg

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3860_zpsce001e8d.jpg

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3861_zpse32c97c7.jpg

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3862_zps86703ed9.jpg

I did cut this notch for the inwale, but didn't take an "after" picture. You'll have to use your imagination.

The Ship's Baby knows that it is important to use screwdrivers to work on the boat.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3864_zps8b868514.jpg

Says the wife, "If the boat can't stand up to that, I'm not going sailing in it!"

Next time: Rounding over the breasthook, quarter knees, and guardrails.

D. Handron
07-02-2014, 11:19 PM
Day 40: Rounding Over the Breasthook, Quarter Knees, and Guardrails

I removed the breasthook, quarter knees and guardrails one more time, so I could round over the edges. First, I sanded the faces with a random orbit sander, removing the layout lines that are visible in some of yesterday's pictures. Then I set up my router in it's home made table. I didn't take too many photos, but I do have before and after shots of one of the quarter knees.

Before:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3868_zps682801e6.jpg

After:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3869_zpsa568f5cd.jpg

I think I used a 1/4" round over bit for most of the work, but these pieces are cut with a 7 degree bevel. On the obtuse edge, the guide holds the bit away from the work, and so I had to put in a 3/8" round over, and then finish up with some hand sanding. It turned out pretty well.

I didn't take photos of the guardrails. I used the same 1/4" round over for those. It was a bit tricky to control those long pieces, but I managed with some roller supports. I did have one mishap, though. At the ends, the counter sunk screw holes were at the same height as the guide bushing. That let the bit move inward, and make a deeper cut. So there are a couple divots near the bow. Them's the breaks. Next time I'll know.

Next time: Glue breasthook, quarter knees, and guardrail.

D. Handron
07-03-2014, 11:15 PM
Day 41: A Change of Plans

When I went out to the shop today I fully intended to glue the breasthook, quarter knees and guardrails into the boat. By the time I was done, I had shaped the transom.

Before I assembled the building jig, I penciled in the shape of the transom. The plans show the height above the sheer at the center of the transom. I sprung a batten through this point and the sheer and traced the curve. The sculling notch is a circle, 2 3/4" diameter, who's center is just a bit below the top of the transom. To cut the sculling notch, I thought a hole saw would be the best bet. Someday I will work on a project where I already have the right size hole saw. Today, I added a new one to the collection.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3872_zps6c6e58b9.jpg

It's a good thing I measured twice! I measured from the wrong line initially, and had too little crown. The hole saw did the job:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3875_zps1ab64f49.jpg

To cut the rest of the curve, I thought a jig saw would be the best. I know many people complain about jig saws not cutting straight, but I've always had good luck with mine. I could set the angle of the base so the top of the transom will be level, cut just a bit above the line, and smooth everything with a belt sander.

I was wrong. Here is the second bit that I broke:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3876_zpse4a9c521.jpg

I just didn't have enough hands to hold both the saw and the boat steady. The reciprocating action of the blade caused the whole boat to vibrate, and... It just didn't work. I was able to finish the cut with my ryoba saw.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3878_zps9bda1e75.jpg

I used the ryoba saw to cut the other side too. It can't cut curves, but I cut a straight line close to the curve (closer than I intended) and then sanded everything down to the line. Here's the result:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3881_zps2e18ff74.jpg

That looks pretty good. I'll round over the edges later on, and sand inside the sculling notch.

Next time: Epoxy the breasthook, quarter knees, and guardrail - for real.

Sailor's Brother
07-04-2014, 07:48 PM
Day 36: Laying Out the Inwale Spacer Blocks

Today, I realized that I have been putting off a job that really needed doing. In the "how to build" book, fitting the thwarts comes after finishing with the breasthook, quarter knees, and guardrail. I realized that fitting the guardrail will likely change the shape of the hull slightly, and that this should be finished before fitting the thwarts. There are some questions that need to be answered before this can be done.

Since I didn't know the answers to these questions, I did something else that I knew needed doing. I started trimming the center frame to accept the inwale. First I clamped a scrap piece of 2x4 against the sheer to support the ryoba saw

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3833_zpsac41f6ad.jpg

and then I went to work

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3834_zps02df54a5.jpg

After trimming off the excess, there was a tedious bit of marking out the thickness of the spacer blocks, and their "sided" dimension, and carefully sawing away a corner of the frame, so the inwale will lie nicely against the remainder, just as if it were an extra spacer block. That mostly went without difficulty, until the saw seemed to stop making progress. And what is that noise?... Oh. Right. Better get a hack saw.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3835_zps789ffc43.jpg

I thought I was so clever when I placed that screw where the guardrail would cover it. I forgot about this bit, though. Oh, well.

At this point, I realized I was still just putting off the inevitable.

Let me say now, that I was surprised by the number of permanent screws included with the kit. Reading Iain Oughtred's "Clinker Plywood Boatbuilding Manual" left me with the impression that hardly any screws are required, and those are mainly to relieve anxiety than to give strength to the hull. The kit specifies 50 screws for joining "plank to guardrail" and 40 screws for "inwale to guardrail." There is no indication in the plans or book about the spacing of these screws. The plans don't show an inwale at all, and the book describes the process of fitting the inwale, but doesn't give specifics about the size of the spacer blocks, or their spacing. The kit provides inwales that are over length by about 2', and an extra 4' of material of the same dimension. This is meant for the spacer blocks.

Before I can attach the guardrail, I need to know where to put the screws, and before I can figure that out, I need to know where the inwale spacer blocks will be. I don't want to interfere with them or their screws. So before I can go any further, I need to lay out the locations of the inwale spacer blocks.

Okay: 40 screws, one each through the breasthook and quarter knee, port and starboard. So 36 screws are left, 18 for each side. I figure 1 1/4" is a good length for the spacer blocks. Eighteen 1 1/4" spacer blocks per side, and giving an allowance for the saw kerf, adds up to... much less than the material provided. Okay, no problem. So I just have to lay out their positions.

This I did by trial and error, using dividers. I end up with 8 blocks aft of the center frame, and 10 forward. They are spaced about 4 1/2" on center. There is about 1/8" difference in this spacing between fore and aft. Nice.

Next Time: Fitting the guardrails.


I did the exact same thing with my frame.. hope you ryobie saw fared better than mine did. It will never be the same again...

D. Handron
07-05-2014, 11:08 AM
I did the exact same thing with my frame.. hope you ryobie saw fared better than mine did. It will never be the same again...

Well, I'm glad to know I'm not alone.

D. Handron
07-05-2014, 11:53 AM
Day 42: Epoxy the Breasthook, Quarter Knees, and Guardrail

After shaping the transom, I had to take a day off, but when I got back to things, it was time to take care of the breasthook, quarter knees, and guardrails. Well, except for one little problem.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3884_zpse908f679.jpg

I think this needs to be straightened up before I do anything else. Does it seem like I'm putting something off? Maybe, but it can't be put it off for ever.

Things went more or less as you would expect. I marked where the various pieces would mate to the hull, and coated both of the mating surfaces with thin epoxy.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3886_zpse6fe02c4.jpg

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3887_zpsb7e37de9.jpg


I made sure to coat the inside of the screw holes with epoxy, to seal them up well. After that, well, epoxy demands haste and constant attention in addition to a not insignificant degree of messiness. Pictures were not taken during the process. Here is how things turned out.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3888_zpsd05e504f.jpg

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3889_zps3f993dae.jpg

I though I'd share a few comments and obsevations that folks may find interesting or useful:

(1) I've started using pastry bags to spread beads of epoxy. I've tried using zip-lock bags before and gave up. The sharper angle at the tip of the pastry bags makes a huge difference. At least to me. Last summer I spent a lot of time using tongue depressors and yellow squeegees to make fillets in the plank laps of my big boat. It would have been much better if I'd used pastry bags to spread a bead of epoxy.

After filling the bag with epoxy and cutting off the tip, lay it on a flat surface and use the edge of a tongue depressor to push the epoxy toward the tip. If you do it right, there will be very little left behind. After that, I roll the large end of the bag around the tongue depressor and use that to help push the epoxy out. Squeezing everything up as you go along, there is very little waste left in the bag.

(2) I do still use tongue depressors - for mixing, some for spreading epoxy on surfaces, and for clean up. I cut one in half straight across, and then I cut one end at a 45 degree angle. These are good for scraping epoxy squeeze out from most sized corners.

(3) After I collect the squeeze out in the mixing bowl, it can usually be put back in the same pastry bag to be used somewhere else. The only limit is how quickly you can work. Once it starts to go off, it doesn't squeeze very well. I hate throwing away unused epoxy.

(4) Even though I clean the squeeze out as best I can, I always have found there are little ridges left some where or drips in hidden places. I've started wiping everything with a disposable dust-free cloth after scraping. That's reduced this quite a bit.

(4) This is getting a bit ahead of things, but I am a recent convert to the heat-gun-and-scraper approach to cleaning cured epoxy mess. I don't know why it's taken me so long to come around. It's dead easy, though it does need to be followed by a bit of sanding.

(5) I still haven't tried masking things with tape. I don't know why. I probably should.

Well, that was a good day's work. Four hours of mixing, spreading, fitting, screwing, scraping, wiping, mixing, spreading,...

Next time: Clean up and fitting thwarts.

D. Handron
07-05-2014, 11:32 PM
Day 43: Scraping and Sanding, and Fitting Thwarts

After yesterday's big epoxy marathon, there is a considerable amount of cleanup to to. I didn't do all of the cleanup today. I left the guardrails; I'll clean those up after I glue the inwales. I did clean up all the screw holes. Here is an instructive photograph I took to illustrate my technique:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3890_zps7c05ab72.jpg

On the left, you can see how we begin, the screw is in the center of the epoxy ring created when I sealed the screw hole. To the right of this, you can see where I've removed the screw. To the right of that one, I've scraped the epoxy around the screw hole, softening it first with a heat gun. Next I give it a pass with a random orbit sander to clean what the scraper leaves behind. Finally, on the right, I've put the screw back in place.

Okay, class is over. There will be a quiz on Monday.

With that behind me, I'm back to working on the thwarts. In the "how to build" book, the thwarts are fitted to the hull before the seat supports are in place, but that seemed to be giving me trouble, so I've decided to jump ahead to the supports. The kit comes with material for the seat supports, but it requires a bit of work to get their final shape. Here is how it comes in the mail:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3891_zps19df203f.jpg

Well, it comes as two pieces taped together. I forgot to take a picture before cutting it to the lengths I pulled off the plans. I used a compund miter saw for this, though there are no tricky angles to cut. The pieces have bevel cut into them already.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3892_zpsad3bd429.jpg

At the bow, the planks have enough of a twist that the blocks need some shaping to sit against the hull without rocking. They don't need much. I used a belt sander laying on it's side and worked on one end at a time, holding the other end very carefully. Once that was done, the supports were spot on. The bevel was just right.

I wanted to angle the end cuts, rather than have them at 90 degrees to the planking, so I carefully marked the location of the cuts:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3894_zps075e8209.jpg

I prepared to cut with a hand saw by whittling a groove to guide the saw blade.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3897_zps226d5e46.jpg

Then I cut the end off:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3898_zps257371c5.jpg


I had found the location of the top edge from the plans, measuring down from the plank lap, and out from the stem. I traced the correct location for the seat support and then I screwed it in place through the plank, and then got out the thwart.

I had already started shaping the bow thwart, but set it aside when I realized I needed to do this other work first. With the seat supports to keep the thwart from sliding too much, it was easy to get the final fit.

We also found time to work on the mast some more today. There's always more time to work on the mast.


Next Time: More work on the thwarts.

D. Handron
07-06-2014, 07:40 PM
Day 44: Seat Supports and Fitting the Stern Support

There is much less curvature in the planks at the center and stern thwarts. The center seat supports didn't need any shaping to fit the hull, and the aft supports only needed a little bit. But these supports did need to have a different bevel cut to fit the seats. I found the correct bevel using a bevel gauge and a small level. Then I checked this against the plans. Everything agreed, so I set the band saw to the correct bevel (you can see the bevel in the photo below) and went to work. I cut the ends at a slight angle, just like the forward seat supports. You can see they've been screwed to the planking in this picture:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3900_zps1404bf78.jpg

After that was done, I began fitting the stern thwart. Here she is with the stern thwart set in place:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3901_zps7227fda2.jpg

Next Time: Disaster!

Falcon1
07-06-2014, 07:57 PM
Very tidy work, sir! Don't know how I've missed this. I've got the Able-bodied-seaman helping me occasionally. Got to get him going with a hand-plane like your big guy!

Cheers,
Mike

https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3867/14568984356_2ba4fb8458_b.jpg

D. Handron
07-07-2014, 01:19 PM
Thanks, Mike. I hadn't seen your Whilly Boat thread either. I'm slowly digesting it now. Looks great. Your A.B. looks like a good worker, too.

D. Handron
07-07-2014, 01:50 PM
Day 45: Disaster!

Well today was my first really big screw up. I made a pattern for the center thwart. It's much easier than the others, because there is very little curvature to the hull here, and the ends of the thwart are just about at right angles to the edges. I laid out the pattern on the surfaced 5/4 cypress board and marked the ends. Then I took the bevel off the boat, and checked that against the plans. Everything matched up, so I marked the bevel on the edges of the board, set the table of the band saw to the correct angle, and sawed the ends to the correct length. I set the thwart in place on the boat and... I had marked the bevels in the wrong direction.

Instead of sloping out along the planking, the ends of the thwart angled inward, leaving a terrible gap at the ends of the plank. Strong words were said. Repeatedly. And forcefully. Time to step away from the boat before a bad situation is made worse.

Well, what can I do. The only down side to building from a kit (at least from a construction point of view) is that there is no excess material, and so very little leeway for mistakes of this kind. There are two options: find suitable replacement material, or find a way to reuse what I have.

I happened to notice that my local Rockler store stocks surfaced 4/4 cypress, but this is only 3/4" thick. Possibly I could glue two pieces and plane them to thickness. Wasteful. Would need to buy a thickness planer, which I had planned to do. But I hadn't planned to do it this week. Or maybe I could just glue a reinforcing rib down the center line of the underside. That would work, but it would be different from the other seats. And that would put the rowing position 1/4" lower. Would that matter? No, not for us, anyway.

An internet search turned up one source for 5/4 cypress lumber. In the 8" width that I need. "We can arrange for shipping," whatever that means. Guess I'll have to call them. How much to ship one board from Georgia?

A ripped to width, planed down 2x10 from the lumber yard? In a pinch, that would get us sailing.

Would CLC be able to ship another center thwart to me? If I asked nicely? Probably. But again, how much is it to ship one board. I guess it could just go by UPS; length + girth is only 66".

I suppose I'll have to follow up on some of these ideas tomorrow.

What about reusing what I've got. The only way to do that is to glue the cutoffs back on. Will that work? It's basically a 1:1 scarf joint, which is not ideal. But it doesn't need to bend, and there is no way to get much leverage on the joint. I guess there's only one way to find out. Mix up some epoxy. The unthickened epoxy soaks into the end grain nicely, that's a good sign. Some thickened epoxy. Clamp together, good squeeze out, not too tight. And take a look at it in the morning.

Ugh. This is not how today's work was supposed to go. It was supposed to be a triumphal final fitting of the last thwart. Rats.

Next Time: Regroup, and refocus.

Dave Gray
07-07-2014, 02:11 PM
I would think 4/4 cypress would work. Isn't the thwart supported by the daggerboard? I am using 4/4 cedar on my center thwart for the pooduck and it is definitely adequate.

Roy Morford
07-07-2014, 06:12 PM
Would it work if you flipped it port for starboard. In my minds eye this would put the (former) bottom of the thwart on top and vice versa and the bevels in the right place. Or am I tripping again?

Paul Scheuer
07-08-2014, 08:08 AM
Assuming that you cut the bevel under the short dimension, and that flipping the thwart would still leave you short, you could still save the piece by making special risers to fill the gaps. I'm thinking of thicker risers either shaped to suit, or incorporating the offending cutoffs.

Rich Jones
07-08-2014, 08:30 AM
Congratulations on your first screw up. It goes to prove that you're human like the rest of us.:) I once made a wrong cut on a complicated goose-neck piece for a staircase rail. That was a $100 mistake. Like you, strong words were uttered. If you look through my Building the Hvalsoe13 thread, you will see actual pictures of my mistakes being feed into the woodstove last winter. My advice is to just take a deep breath, let this misfortune go and replace the piece of wood. Trying to fix what you've got won't make you happy (unless you're going to paint the wood to hide any joints). A replacement from the original kit builder will produce the best results as far as matching the wood.

Cogeniac
07-08-2014, 09:08 AM
UPS can ship up to 6 feet, I think, as long as it is not heavy. I have had numerous single boards shipped from Rockler. The cost is not generally too high.

The worst was green white oak for bending ribs. That came on a a pallet by truck. Each board weighed about 100 Lb. Total shipping cost for that was about $250..nearly the cost of the wood itself!

Interesting observation about building from a kit..No room for errors!

heavyweather
07-08-2014, 09:24 AM
You are only short 2-3cm i guess.
Make the support wider and carve a wooden fillet above. Hides your joint and will not be noticed. It looks to me that the joint in the board will also be hidden behind the central frame when looking from the bow?

D. Handron
07-08-2014, 09:38 AM
Wow, lots of great ideas. I'm always impressed with the readers of this forum.


I would think 4/4 cypress would work. Isn't the thwart supported by the daggerboard? I am using 4/4 cedar on my center thwart for the pooduck and it is definitely adequate.

That's good to know. I'd always thought that, when building bookshelves, 3' was the longest span. Maybe that's for plywood, or maybe people don't weigh as much as a 3' shelf of books. The thwart is supported by the daggerboard case, but only about 1" at the forward edge. I worried that the thwart would twist under a load, but now that I think about it again, maybe I shouldn't.

D. Handron
07-08-2014, 12:43 PM
Would it work if you flipped it port for starboard. In my minds eye this would put the (former) bottom of the thwart on top and vice versa and the bevels in the right place. Or am I tripping again?

Interesting, that had not occurred to me. I bet that would work. The seat would be an inch lower than designed, and it would notch into the daggerboard trunk, rather than being supported by it. It would still give lateral support to the trunk. Something to consider.

D. Handron
07-08-2014, 12:47 PM
Assuming that you cut the bevel under the short dimension, and that flipping the thwart would still leave you short, you could still save the piece by making special risers to fill the gaps. I'm thinking of thicker risers either shaped to suit, or incorporating the offending cutoffs.

Yes, I made the pattern to match the underside, so when set into place the bottom of the seat extends out to the hull, but there is a V shaped gap between the seat and the hull. When flipped, the top surface just barely sits on the existing seat supports. Maybe that can be filled with the offcuts.

D. Handron
07-08-2014, 12:49 PM
You are only short 2-3cm i guess.
Make the support wider and carve a wooden fillet above. Hides your joint and will not be noticed. It looks to me that the joint in the board will also be hidden behind the central frame when looking from the bow?

Yes, just under an inch at each end. Something like that will work. The center thwart is actually notched to fit over the center frame, so it will need something there, too.

D. Handron
07-08-2014, 12:53 PM
UPS can ship up to 6 feet, I think, as long as it is not heavy. I have had numerous single boards shipped from Rockler. The cost is not generally too high.

The worst was green white oak for bending ribs. That came on a a pallet by truck. Each board weighed about 100 Lb. Total shipping cost for that was about $250..nearly the cost of the wood itself!

Interesting observation about building from a kit..No room for errors!

The last time I checked, there limit was that length (the longest dimension) plus girth (distance around the shorter sides) could not exceed 108". This board, even with packing material, would not exceed that. And it wouldn't be all that heavy, either. I think that shipping would not break the bank. Thankfully, though, I did find a local supplier.

D. Handron
07-08-2014, 05:27 PM
Day 46: Recovery and Daggerboard Case

Okay, one phone call in the morning confirmed that I have a local supplier of cypress. Mars Lumber (in Mars, PA) has 5/4 cypress in stock. A visit there later in the day revealed that they don't have much, but they did have just what I needed: 5/4 cypress, surfaced on 4 sides, 1"x8.25"x5.5'.

At home, I notice that, while cypress, it's not a good match for the other seats. It's color is a little streaky, not like the more uniform dark and light yellow grain of the material supplied in the kit. It's amusing how quickly I have turned from desperate for any solution to picky, picky, picky.

This is fueled by the fact that the end that I glued back on to the original piece seems to be quite solid. I didn't do any destructive testing, for obvious reasons, but it was not coming off by hand. If I glue the other end back on, I can cut the bevels so that a solid piece will span the gap between the seat supports. There will be glue lines visible at the ends of the seat, but those will stay there as reminders to be more careful next time.

So that is my plan for now. If it doesn't work out for whatever reason, I've got the extra board for backup.


While the epoxy is curing on the other end of the thwart, I sort out the daggerboard trunk. The kit provides two plywood trunk sides, pre-milled bedlog material and material for spacer blocks at the ends. The bedlogs are basically L shaped, the plywood fits into the corner of the L, and the top of the L is cut with a slope, so that water will drain easily on either tack. The bedlogs and spacer blocks are both supplied in a single length and must be cut. I measure twice, three times... one more time to confirm that there is easily an extra two inches of material, and if I cut each piece in the middle, there will be no problem whatsoever. I make the cut with a compound miter saw - no fancy hand too techniques today.

After the case is put together, the spacer blocks, which protrude past the bedlogs, must be notched to fit into the hole I will cut in the bottom of the boat. Here is the "exploded view"

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3999_zps53cf8e78.jpg

And the case all put together

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3998_zps8eb25f5d.jpg

Here's a close up of the notch in the spacer blocks

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3990_zps47e23fa8.jpg

which must be rounded forward and aft

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3991_zps99b903c3.jpg

It looks like I used my special "blurring rasp" on this piece.

Next time: More work on the center thwart.

heavyweather
07-08-2014, 06:32 PM
You could always drill some holes in the sides and knock dowels in the thwart if you don't trust the glue.

Sailor's Brother
07-08-2014, 08:20 PM
hmmm angling the top to allow water to drain off on either tack... very good idea, I'll have to post it in the "next time" bin... it's already full of brilliant ideas (and some duh moments) that's just too late to fix now...

D. Handron
07-09-2014, 07:44 AM
Day 47: Fitting the Center Thwart

Well, the ends are glued back onto the center thwart. I used the pattern I made and very carefully laid out the bevels. I cut outside the lines at first, and then creep up on a snug fit. So far so good.

This thwart is meant to fit around the center frame; the forward 1" lies in front of the frame. So I will need to cut out a notch with a beveled bottom, to match the bevel of the frame, which is slightly different from the bevel of the planking. The layout is not so bad. I can cut most of the edges with the band saw, and finish up with the ryoba saw. I don't have any tool that will make that angled cut at the bottom, though.

In the end, I used a chisel. This wasn't as hard as it sounds, but it didn't leave the cleanest surface. And I cut it just a little too tight. After some drudgery with sandpaper backed up by a piece of scrap (I don't have a rasp that fits in that notch) I've got a reasonable job of it.

Here's the result from forward

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3988_zpsd0f036df.jpg

and aft

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3989_zpsa03a5053.jpg

You can see the glue lines if you look carefully. A single piece of wood is supported by both seat supports. The screws that hold the seat in place (no glue) will pass through the glue line. I don't have too much worry about the strength, but I've still got Plan B if something goes wrong.

Next Time: Daggerboard work, and screwing the thwarts in place.

Incidentally, I'll be in a secluded location the rest of this week, so I won't be able to post any more updates until this weekend. See you all then!

D. Handron
07-13-2014, 11:08 PM
Day 48: Daggerboard Slot, and Screwing Seats in Place

Well, I've returned from the Back of Beyond. When I started this thread, I promised to present a day's worth of work on the boat each day. I think I've kept to this, prior to this most recent absence, at least on average. I'm a couple days behind, now, but I'll try to catch up this week.

I've reached another point where I have to work backward to figure out what to do next. The next logical thing would be to glue the daggerboard case. That's the sequence shown in the "how to build" book. The case has to be scribed to fit the bottom of the boat, though. The pegs that I carefully rounded, and which protrude through the bottom would complicate the scribing if I glue everything up now. Well, not the scribing itself, but shaping the bedlogs to fit the curve. Instead I'll scribe the curve on the screwed together case, disassemble the case, cut the bedlogs to the correct profile, reassemble the case, and then shape the spacers to match the now profile of the bedlogs.

In order to do that, I'll need to cut the centerboard slot. So that is the next item on the agenda.

The slot is off center, so the daggerboard will pass beside the keel. After carefully measuring the offset from the center line drawn on the bottom panel a long, long time ago, I use a brace and bits to drill a 9/16" hole at each end. I don't have a spotter handy to tell me when the lead screw comes through the bottom, so I drill in a little bit, and then drill a small hole in the center. I use the hole from the lead screw to center this small hole, and drill all the way through. The exit hole shoes where to set the lead screw to drill through from the other side.

Okay, but several attempts to turn the boat over by myself are unsuccessful. It would be easy to do on a beach, or in the front yard, but not in a crowded shop with just enough room to walk around the boat. So, I have to wait for the crew to assemble and turn the boat over. Then I finish drilling the two holes from the bottom.

Next I draw two lines connecting the holes, one on each side, tangent to the cut-out circles. I use my jig saw to cut as close to those lines as I can. I get pretty close, but they'll need to be cleaned up after the case is glued in place. The crew are still all nearby, so we turn the boat back over. This picture is from a little later, when I'm gluing the case into place, but it clearly shows the slot.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4001_zps2d0a71cb.jpg

Next I try to fit the case into the slot. It takes a little bit of work with a rasp to shape the pegs on the case so that everything will come together. Once that's done, I can use a pencil, as shown in the "how to build" book, to scribe the shape of the bottom onto the bedlogs.

Also today, I screwed the seats in place. I tried to place the screws as shown in the plans, measuring of the screws from the end of the seat, and from the forward or aft edge of the seat. Thankfully, this proceeds with little drama. None of the screws miss the seat supports or come out through the hull.

Next Time: Gluing the seat supports.

D. Handron
07-14-2014, 07:40 AM
Day 49: Gluing Seat Supports

Today, I glued the seat support blocks in place. There was nothing tricky about this; they'd each been fitted to the hull and secured in the correct location with two screws. I just had to keep track of which was which while I coated the mating surfaces with straight epoxy. Well, I did trace around them before removing them, so I would know where to put the epoxy. I put thickened epoxy on the hull. Then I held each block just above the epoxy while I got the screws started. Tightening the screws pulled everything together with a minimum of mess. Plenty of squeeze out to clean up, though. Here is the result:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3996_zps67818de5.jpg

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3993_zpsd68f25c5.jpg

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3994_zps955914bd.jpg

Next Time: Gluing the daggerboard case, and some other things.

D. Handron
07-16-2014, 09:32 AM
Day 50: Daggerboard Case, Thwarts, Inwale Spacer Blocks, and Mast

We did a lot of different things today. The biggest, though not the most time consuming, was gluing the daggerboard case together. Here it is:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4000_zpsa94b059e.jpg

It was relatively painless. The screws located all the parts, so there was no worry about them shifting our of alignment under clamping pressure. I coated the inside of the case with epoxy (before assembly!) but no glass cloth or anything of that sort. Nothing of the sort is mentioned in the plans or "how to build" book. I guess it would be overkill on a boat of this size.

My son helped sand the thwarts:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_3997_zps6324ed3c.jpg

And then I remounted them on the newly-glued-in-place seat supports. I ran into a little trouble here. Some of the screws through the seats interfered with the screws holding the seat supports to the planking. Removing some of the screws from the supports revealed some drill marks in a few of them. Some of the screws holes for the thwarts must have nicked these screws. When I epoxied the supports in place, the screws got all mixed up. I tried to solve the problem by re-drilling the holes, but this didn't seem to work. I don't know why this was a problem now and not before. The solution was simple, though. The screws aren't really necessary to hold the supports in place, so out they come. I'll fill the holes with epoxy later on.

My son also helped plane the mast some more. This is taking longer than really necessary, but slow and steady wins the race. Right?

The last thing of the day was to sand the inwale spacer blocks. I cut them a few days ago with my compound miter saw (overkill, but quick). I gave each of the 36 blocks a quick sanding, with special attention on the cleaning up the saw marks and the edges that were cut. Tedious, but a good way to finish up a long day in the shop. Mistakes happen when I'm tired, but there's not many mistakes to make in this job.

Next Time: Installing the daggerboard case.

D. Handron
07-16-2014, 02:03 PM
Day 51: Installing the Daggerboard Case

Today was a big event, though not really a long day. I glued the centerboard in place in the boat. First, I outlined where the case would sit, then I coated that area with unthickened epoxy

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4002_zpsa23fcb87.jpg

and coated the bottom of the case with epoxy

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4004_zps9a8d9205.jpg

and then spread some thickened epoxy on the hull and set the case in place, gently tapping it home so I can get the six screws that hold it in place while the epoxy cures.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4005_zpsc7988155.jpg

You can see there was a generous amount of squeeze out. I checked carefully to make sure that the case was perpendicular to the hull. I knew from trial fitting that it had a tendency to lean to port, so I tightened the starboard screws first. That did the trick. Here's a wider view:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4006_zps20f7b26d.jpg

Next Time: Notching the center thwart, mast step and partners, spacer blocks, and beveling thwarts.

andrewpatrol
07-16-2014, 04:23 PM
You disappoint me Mr Handron, I was about to praise you for a very clean build and you went and left that mess around the daggerboard case. Shame on you. Seriously though you make it look very neat, well done..

John How
07-16-2014, 04:52 PM
You disappoint me Mr Handron, I was about to praise you for a very clean build and you went and left that mess around the daggerboard case. Shame on you. Seriously though you make it look very neat, well done..

I agree with you Andrew, I see several projects here on the forum that look like they were just screwed together. You don't see even a smear of glue anywhere. I don't know how they do it. I certainly can't.

Looking good D.Handron!

Sailor's Brother
07-16-2014, 08:21 PM
Very nice build, you're moving at a pace that just amazes me...

Quick question, what's the kit come with for the tiller to rudder attachment? plans and book call for 1/4 inch ply... recent experience has shown me that this is insufficient... just wondering if the kit upgrades this part???

Sailor's Brother

D. Handron
07-16-2014, 10:05 PM
You disappoint me Mr Handron, I was about to praise you for a very clean build and you went and left that mess around the daggerboard case. Shame on you. Seriously though you make it look very neat, well done..

It's a coping mechanism. If I leave that big mess, I can pretend I don't see all the little bits here and there that will need to be cleaned up before finishing the hull.

D. Handron
07-16-2014, 10:09 PM
Quick question, what's the kit come with for the tiller to rudder attachment? plans and book call for 1/4 inch ply... recent experience has shown me that this is insufficient... just wondering if the kit upgrades this part???


I'll have to double check, but I think it comes with 1/4 ply. I read about your misadventure. I'm thinking maybe I have some 3/8 inch meranti ply that would give a sturdier connection.

D. Handron
07-17-2014, 07:45 AM
Day 52: Notching the Center Thwart, Mast Step and Partners, Spacer Blocks, and Beveling Thwarts

Well, this was a long day in the shop, and I got a lot done. The first thing was to cut a notch in the center thwart where it rests on the daggerboatd case. The notch is not as deep as it is meant to be. I had a little mishap when I was sanding the top of the daggerboard case. I wasn't paying attention to the angle of my belt sander. I ended up sanding the top at an angle. Not too dramatic, but noticeable. Leveling this off made the case a bit shorter than intended at the aft end - less than 1/8", maybe 3/32". So the center thwart is really only notched 1/16" or so. I think it will still help stiffen that connection. It was fun work to chisel it out, anyway.

Next up, was drilling the mast hole in the forward thwart. This hole is drilled at a slight angle. I wasn't confident in my ability to sight "vertical" and "not quite vertical" in two different directions while running the hole saw, so I made a guide hole. First I drilled a hole vertically into a piece of scrap - by hand, I don't have a drill press at the moment.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4009_zps76d9feb4.jpg

Then I trimmed the bottom at the angle picked up from the plans. I had to cut the end at the angle of the mast, and then draw a line perpendicular to that to get the correct angle.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4011_zpse6cf5ccd.jpg

The result is a guide hole that is pretty close to the correct angle.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4012_zpseb0fdebd.jpg

I laid that block in place and used it as a guide to drill a pilot hole for the hole saw to follow.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4014_zps4f0a9bc0.jpg

Incidentally, the hole is the same diameter as the sculling notch in the transom, 2 3/4". So I didn't need to buy a new one. That was a nice surprise.

I still tried to sight down the bevel gauge while I drilled, but the pre-drilled hole gave me some extra confidence.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4016_zps36a17875.jpg

I've got a lot more pictures from today's work, so I'll have to finish in a follow up post.

To Be Continued...

D. Handron
07-17-2014, 07:58 AM
Day 52: Continued

Next up was the mast step. The kit provides a pre-milled block for the step

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4017_zps7a64e591.jpg

which needs to be rounded over and sanded

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4018_zps5dd46111.jpg

and it needs a way to drain any water than gets inside the step. I used my router in a home made table for that.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4022_zpsf66adb5b.jpg

The step is located on the bottom by a sort of fussy method described in the "how to build" book. I'm thankful it's described, though. It would have been difficult to do without those directions.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4022_zpsf66adb5b.jpg

I installed the mast partners, and starboard side spacerblocks, too:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4028_zps1a86235d.jpg

I finished up by making the bevels on the underside of the forward and aft thwarts. Used the spokeshave for that. Worked nicely.

Next time: Gluing the port side spacer blocks

Garth Jones
07-17-2014, 08:27 AM
Great thread! I look forward to seeing your pretty boat out on Lake Arthur. I built a Ness Yawl several years ago and Lake Arthur is my boat's regular summer home so hopefully we'll run into each other (well, not literally) some time. My boat is cream with a wide red strip on the shear and red sails. Her name is Goldberry.

You have gotten past your thwart problem, but if something like that comes up again I'd be happy to joint/plane a plank for a fellow boat builder. I design and build custom furniture and I have a fairly well equipped shop. Mars Lumber, which is where I buy most of my wood, is great, but much of what they sell is not surfaced.

Cheers,
Garth

D. Handron
07-17-2014, 04:18 PM
Garth, I'm glad to hear from you. I've seen your pictures of Goldberry on your website. I'd love to see her up close sometime. I have hopes of being on the water before very long. I'll keep an eye out for you.

Thanks for your offer of help. It's much appreciated. One other question for you: Mars Lumber only stocks hardwood, if I'm correct. Do you know of a good source in the area for softwoods like fir, cedar or spruce?

D. Handron
07-17-2014, 04:28 PM
Day 53: Gluing the Port Side Spacer Blocks

Well, I took things a little slowly today. I was physically tired after all the crawling under and around the boat that was required yesterday. I glued the port side spacer blocks. I don't seem to have taken any pictures, so here are a couple more of the starboard spacers.

One side coated with unthickened epoxy:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4024_zpsc69416b7.jpg

A whole lot of clamps in use:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4026_zps75e7cea3.jpg

I usually don't like these spring clamps so much; I prefer C-clamps. They were just right for this job, though.

Next Time: Fitting the inwales.

Garth Jones
07-17-2014, 06:14 PM
D.,

Mars Lumber has had some soft woods in the past. I've gotten some nice long (20') pieces of 4/4 Douglas Fir for them (all of Goldberry's spars are made from that) but I don't know how much they stock. They do generally carry Western Red Cedar, both 4/4 stock and 2x material. I made two Greenland style kayak paddles from cedar 2x4s that came out well - very nice wood. Anyway, give them a call. They are great guys and have always been very helpful to me. Other possible sources are Babcock Lumber and West Elizabeth Lumber (I haven't dealt with them in some time because driving down there is painfully slow from my shop). As far as I know finding Sitka Spruce around here is impossible.

There is a small but growing community of wooden boat builders at Lake Arthur. In addition to my Ness Yawl there are a few CLC boats and wood kayaks (all CLC kits, as far as I know). Your wee ship will be a lovely addition. Hopefully we can meet up on the water sometime soon.

Cheers,
Garth

D. Handron
07-19-2014, 08:14 AM
Day 54: Fitting the Inwales

Hmm. Seems like I forgot my camera for this event. It's not really that photogenic, though, I guess. A lot of clamping in place, marking, removing, cutting, and clamping again. It was acutally much easier than I expected. I was ready with my compound miter saw to carefully match the angles in two directions. In the end, a 45 degree cut straight across the piece fit almost perfectly for all but one end. That needed a little attention with a rasp, and that's all. Still, there was a bit of back and forth to ensure I didn't cut them too short. You can't really set the piece in place to measure until it's cut short, but you can't cut it short until you put it in place to measure.

I also rounded over the inner edges with my router table setup. Everything is ready to glue these in place now.

Next Time: Gluing the starboard inwale.

D. Handron
07-19-2014, 05:23 PM
Day 55: Gluing the Starboard Inwale

Well, that about covers it. Today I glued the starboard inwale. In real life, four days passed between the fitting and the gluing. It was the four days last week when I was unable to post. My son and I were at Cub Scout Camp, and had a great time. Nonetheless, I was glad to get back to the boat.

The glue up went pretty smoothly, I think. I started clamping in the center then got the ends in place, and then started clamping in between. I would get each clamp loosely in place, holding the inwale against the spacer block. Then I'd feel with my thumb and index finger whether they were lined up evenly. Usually they were, but sometimes I'd have to loosen the clamp and give things a push up or down. Then I'd wipe my hands and go get the next clamp. I struggled with a few, but for the most part everything fell into place. Here it is while the epoxy cured:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4033_zps7ce5320f.jpg

You can also see the center thwart all ready to have its underside beveled. You can see the template I made to create a nice curve for the end of the bevel.

Next Time: Glue port side inwale, 16-side the yard, begin shaping the daggerboard.

D. Handron
07-20-2014, 11:23 PM
Day 56: Glue Port Side Inwale, 16-side the Boom, Begin Shaping Daggerboard

Today I glued the second inwale. I used the same procedure as the starboard side, but I'll elaborate a little bit. I put the thickened epoxy on the spacer blocks and then ste the inwale in place. To work cleanly, it is necessary to get the inwale in the correct position without dragging it through the epoxy. Here is how I did that:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4090_zps66e1101b.jpg

I've got five of these quick-grip hand clamps. I clamped two near each end before putting the inwale in place, then clamped the inwale at the center (which I had cleverly marked ahead of time!). The clamps at the ends hold the inwale away from the epoxy while I get things lined up in the center. The picture shows a dry run; in practice it's just the same - but with epoxy.

Next I took the two hand clamps nearest the center and, while aligning the inwale with one hand, clamp about half way between the center and the end of the boat, one forward and one aft. Then I used the last two clamps to clamp the inwale in place at the breasthook and quarter knee. At that point the inwale is fairly well positioned. There's now time to add a clamp at each of the spacer blocks.

With that done, I turned my attention to the spars. They have all been 8-sided at this point, so I began 16-siding the yard. This is tricky. It only takes a couple passes with the plane to take the corners down. It seems to get into a state of "too round to take off corners, but not round enough to use sandpaper." That being the case, I decided I ought to do some kind of 8-siding at the ends, to make them nicely rounded.

I marked out the 45 degree angle I wanted to bring them down to, and thought the random orbit sander would be a good way to do this. That worked like a charm, until the sanding pad disintegrated - again. This happened to me a couple years ago. I'd had the tool over a decade at that point, much more. When I looked online to order a replacement, I discovered that it had been recalled for this reason. It seemed easier just to order a replacement pad, which I did. It cost $25, and by the time I'd paid for shipping and tax - probably destination charges and restocking fees, too - I'd paid almost $50. I'm not excited to do that again. A Stanley surf form took will do the rest of the job, and not with that much more effort.

Lastly, I began shaping the daggerboard. Here you can see the edges of the bevel marked on the board:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4092_zps37808e2d.jpg

I've started in on one edge with a block plane, but I switched to my spokeshave pretty quickly. That tool was a good purchase. Thanks for the tip Steve (stromborg).

Next Time: Shaping the daggerboard, sanding the aft thwart and yard.

D. Handron
07-21-2014, 01:23 PM
Day 57: Sanding the Gunnels, Shaping the Daggerboard, Sanding the aft Thwart and Yard

I didn't do much cleanup after gluing the guardrails, since I knew that gluing the inwales would make more mess in the same place. With the inwales now in place, I'm anxious to see how it will look without the epoxy splotches. I had been intending to use my random orbit sander to do this, but after yesterday, I guess that's out. I opted to gently, very carefully, go over the gunnels with my belt sander. I found my finest grit belt, and set it to a slow speed, and checked my progress often. Everything worked out fine. I'm not sure why I don't have a picture. That seems like the sort of triumphal moment I'd want to document. I'll have to take a picture and add it later.

There's still plenty of scraping and sanding to do on the under side of the inwales, but I can't see that right now, so I'm trying not to think about it either. I'll have the boat turned over soon to put the keel in place, so I'll take care of it then.

I also finished shaping the daggerboard. I got everything mostly shaped with a spokeshave, and then smoothed it up with the belt sander - again, very carefully.

I had previously shaped the bevels on the underside of the aft thwart. I used my router table to round over the top edges with a 1/4" bit. Then I hand sanded the whole thing.

Having decided that the thwarts really needed a machine's touch, and not wanting to press my luck with the belt sander, I moved on to the yard, which I had 16-sided not long ago. I tried a few approaches to this, but in the end, the most straight forward worked best for me. I put on a leather work glove and grabbed a sanding belt. With the belt in the palm of my gloved hand, I took hold of the spar and started sanding along the grain, turning the spar and moving along it's length as I worked. The sitka spruce is soft and sands easily, but it is also... I don't know... fluffy. Sawing and planing the spar left a lot of "hair" on the surface. Not just at the edges, as happens with a lot of wood, but all over the surface. This fluff was difficult to sand smooth. In the end, whatever small problems elbow grease couldn't solve were taken care of by laziness.

I think the yard turned out pretty nice. Nitpickers will have a field day, but I think it meets the 10-foot rule (i.e. looks good from ten feet away). If I ever find that the level of craftsmanship is not satisfactory, I suppose I could go back at it again with the sandpaper.

I can see my way through to the end of the project now. I'm excited and motivated, but also tired. I've been going at this pretty hard since May and it's starting to take a toll. I'm also getting to parts of the project that I haven't been able to work through in my mind - finishing, rigging - and that is making me apprehensive. Also there are practical considerations that are consuming mental energy. How will I transport her when she's done? Should I get a registration, or just a DCNR use permit? What if I want to sail her in another state?

Oh, well, back to the boat shop.

Next Time: 16-side the boom, sanding the yard boom and thwarts and then finishing with D1.

D. Handron
07-21-2014, 10:58 PM
Day 58: 16-side the Boom, Sanding the Yard, Boom, and Thwarts and then Finishing with D1

Well I bought a new random orbit sander. My old one was a Makita; the new one is from H****** F******. Yeah, I know, but the cost was the same as the replacement pad for the Makita. If it lasts two years of moderate use, then it's apparently cost effective. It seems to do a pretty good job. I put it to work right away sanding the thwarts.

Then I started 16-siding the boom. That went as quickly as the yard. When it came time to round and smooth it, I tried something different. I set the boom on two sawhorses and rolled it back and forth while running the random orbit sander over it. Much less labor intensive than the hand sanding I did before, and it came out almost as nice. Not quite as round, I don't think. It may be that we didn't go far enough in 8-siding the boom, or maybe this technique just isn't as good as the other. I don't know what I'll do for the mast yet.

We also started finishing the pieces that are complete: thwarts, yard, and boom. We're using Deks Olje. There are two components to this system. D1 is an oil based finish that is applied wet on wet until the wood doesn't soak up any more. This dries in 24 hours, and takes 3 days to fully cure. We gave these bits 5 coats of D1, with everyone lending a hand. I passed out solo cups with an inch of D1 in the bottom and a chip brush, and we went to work. We'll finish the whole hull with D1. D2 is a gloss finish that is applied over the D1. I may do some of the "trim" type bits of the boat with this, but we'll see how it turns out with the D1. Here is the action:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4093_zps08e28a25.jpg

Next Time: Working on the Rudder.

Paul Scheuer
07-22-2014, 09:09 AM
Just as a tip, and it may be too late, as rapidly as you and your team works. I've had good results when doing final coats on oars, paddles, etc, to hang the pieces vertically. Working from top to bottom it allows for a wet edge on the circumference while you rotate the piece from below. Fewer drips and if there are any they're harder to see. The bugs much prefer horizontal varnish, I've found. Wonderful thread, by the way. I'm impressed with the photography.

heavyweather
07-22-2014, 09:47 AM
I guess there is no perfect method for varnishing. I like to use Coelan (guess some will say it is no real varnish) on oars and spars. Vertical applied with a gloved hand, unthined one coat.

D. Handron
07-22-2014, 02:53 PM
Just as a tip, and it may be too late, as rapidly as you and your team works. I've had good results when doing final coats on oars, paddles, etc, to hang the pieces vertically. Working from top to bottom it allows for a wet edge on the circumference while you rotate the piece from below. Fewer drips and if there are any they're harder to see. The bugs much prefer horizontal varnish, I've found. Wonderful thread, by the way. I'm impressed with the photography.

Thanks, Paul. You're not too late at all. The mast is still laying, 8-sided, on the spar bench. It glares at me every time I go into the shop, saying "what about me?!?" Hanging the spars vertically was my first thought. Their length makes it a little tricky, though, and there is really not much room in my shop at the moment, so I ended up with the arrangement shown in the picture. The D1 isn't varnish, it's basically an oil finish, so drips and runs don't seem to be too much of a problem. I may decide to use D2 on the spars, though, and if I do I'll try to hang them vertically.

D. Handron
07-22-2014, 02:58 PM
I guess there is no perfect method for varnishing. I like to use Coelan (guess some will say it is no real varnish) on oars and spars. Vertical applied with a gloved hand, unthined one coat.

I've never heard of this product before. I guess you have had some success with it? I'll have to take a look at it when my next project gets to that point.

D. Handron
07-22-2014, 03:10 PM
Day 59: Working on the Rudder

I'd been putting off work on the daggerboard and rudder for a while. The daggerboard went well the other day, so I thought I'd get started on the rudder today. For whatever reason, I'm having a tougher time with this. The spokeshave isn't behaving as nicely as before. I don't know if it is because the rudder has more curved edges, and so more changes in the grain, or if the grain of the wood is just running differently, but I'm getting a lot more tear out. There is also a very funky section of plywood in one part - it looks like a void was filled, or a veneer laid down incorrectly. This left a spot with a lot of very hard glue.

I switched to the belt sander, but that was also giving me more trouble than before. Maybe my memory of beveling the daggerboard is overly rosy. I thought it best to take a break before going back at it. That makes a short day, but that's probably for the best.

Next Time: Shaping the rudder, oarlocks.

heavyweather
07-22-2014, 03:27 PM
The guys from Bambooride also use it on their frames.
Some people here on the board have also used it successfully.
http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthread.php?19248-Coelan-wood-finish

There is also not very much other stuff available here apart from this marina finish from Germany. We don't have a sea either. Also good for metal and other materials. Fills gaps. If it wasn't that expensive I would try it on a skinboat... would be interesting if anybody ever did. There is some pu goop that seems to be much like Coelan but 2k.


Edit: reminder to myself..google before posting questions to myself...
Check: Coelan seems to be great for nylon skin boats. https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/Yost-Skin-On-Frame-Boats/conversations/messages/160

D. Handron
07-23-2014, 01:10 PM
Day 60: Beveling the Rudder, Oarlocks

Well, I finished beveling the rudder. At least I think so. I may come back and hit it again, but I think it looks pretty good. I'll have some more pictures of that later on.

I also started working on the oarlock pads. Four of them come with the kit, with a bevel cut on each end, like this.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4096_zps8e833607.jpg

They need to be shaped to match the curve of the gunwale (guard rail + inwale = gunwale, right?) The curve is slight, but noticable. I traced the curves onto the bottom with pencil. I just sanded down the outside curve with my belt sander. It has a flat on it's left side, so I can hold it on that side, and operate the trigger with my left hand, while holding the workpiece in my right hand. It's much more stable and much less ridiculous than it sounds. I cut the inner curve on the band saw and used a sanding block to smooth it out. Here is how that goes:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4094_zps188d84bb.jpg

I tried to rise to the challenge posed by Willin' and recess the rowlocks into the pads. I'm not sure if I really qualify, though, because I left them a little bit proud of the surface. I did this partly because I though if they sat above the surface it would look better then if I accidentally recessed them below the surface. Mostly, though, I was lazy and in a hurry. Maybe I'll come back later and finish this job.

Next Time: More oarlocks, rudder, and daggerboard work.

D. Handron
07-25-2014, 06:58 PM
Day 61: Installing the Oarlocks, Gluing the Cheeks on the Daggerboard and Rudder

Well, I finished the other three oarlock pads. I wasn't completely happy with the way I mounted them on the guardrail, but I can't see any better way. The axle on which the rowlock horns turn (shaft? stem? shank?) is just the right size to fit between the inwale and the sheer plank, but the rowlock socket is deeper than the rowlock pads, and so I had to drill into the guardrail to make room for them. I put the pads in place by measuring from the plans, and that set one pair of rowlocks partly over a spacer block, so I had to drill there also so I could insert the horns.

I used the rowlock pads as a guide for a forstner bit to drill for the socket, then used the socket for a regular twist bit to drill for the horns. The real issue I had was that the placement of the screws securing the pads is very fussy. They are #12 screws, and at each end of the pad one goes into the 1/2" inwale, the other into the guardrail. If I had it to do again, I would plan ahead for the location of the rowlocks, and make the guardrail solid in those locations. Then I might dispense with the pads altogether. In my opinion, they have the appearance of an afterthought. But then, I'm not much of a rower. Maybe there is good reason for doing it this way. Anyway, here they are:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4097_zpseb329ca4.jpg

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4098_zps1df3f3c1.jpg

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4099_zpsa3234285.jpg

I also glued the cheeks onto the rudder today, and the cheeks at the top of the daggerboard:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4100_zpsceb70bf5.jpg

The weight of the clamps was causing the cheeks to slide down the rudder. If you look carefully, you'll see that the lowest clamp is not on the cheeks. It's just keeping them from sliding. Another bar clamp goes from front to back of the rudder, to keep the cheeks from sliding that way.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4101_zpsabb44929.jpg

Next Time: Preparing the keel, and gluing the daggerboard case top.

Sailor's Brother
07-25-2014, 07:51 PM
Day 61: Installing the Oarlocks, Gluing the Cheeks on the Daggerboard and Rudder

Well, I finished the other three oarlock pads. I wasn't completely happy with the way I mounted them on the guardrail, but I can't see any better way. The axle on which the rowlock horns turn (shaft? stem? shank?) is just the right size to fit between the inwale and the sheer plank, but the rowlock socket is deeper than the rowlock pads, and so I had to drill into the guardrail to make room for them. I put the pads in place by measuring from the plans, and that set one pair of rowlocks partly over a spacer block, so I had to drill there also so I could insert the horns.

I used the rowlock pads as a guide for a forstner bit to drill for the socket, then used the socket for a regular twist bit to drill for the horns. The real issue I had was that the placement of the screws securing the pads is very fussy. They are #12 screws, and at each end of the pad one goes into the 1/2" inwale, the other into the guardrail. If I had it to do again, I would plan ahead for the location of the rowlocks, and make the guardrail solid in those locations. Then I might dispense with the pads altogether. In my opinion, they have the appearance of an afterthought. But then, I'm not much of a rower. Maybe there is good reason for doing it this way. Anyway, here they are:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4097_zpseb329ca4.jpg

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4098_zps1df3f3c1.jpg

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4099_zpsa3234285.jpg

I also glued the cheeks onto the rudder today, and the cheeks at the top of the daggerboard:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4100_zpsceb70bf5.jpg

The weight of the clamps was causing the cheeks to slide down the rudder. If you look carefully, you'll see that the lowest clamp is not on the cheeks. It's just keeping them from sliding. Another bar clamp goes from front to back of the rudder, to keep the cheeks from sliding that way.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4101_zpsabb44929.jpg

Next Time: Preparing the keel, and gluing the daggerboard case top.


I had the same issue with my oarlock sockets, I couldn't put them centered where visually I wanted too, as they would then require removing a portion of the sheer strake and making a hole in the boat... I guess I could have use thicker spacer blocks, but visually....

D. Handron
07-25-2014, 11:51 PM
Day 62: Keel Prep and Daggerboard Case Top

There are only a couple pieces that have yet to be attached to the boat - the keel and the top of the daggerboard case. It's time to start on those. I rounded over the edges of the keel with a 1/4" bit in my router table. Then I wanted to drill the hole for the "keel bolt," a 1/4" machine screw, while I can still have it on my workbench. I have a drill with a level built into the top, so I drew a line where the screw should go, and set it up level on my workbench.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4102_zps51b71733.jpg

I used a long bit (12" I think) and kept it aligned with the pencil mark, while also keeping an eye on the level. I drilled half way from one side and halfway from the other to meet in the middle. Everything went smoothly. When I have a helper, I can get the keel dry fit, and screwed in place before removing it and mixing epoxy.

There is a mahogany cap that covers the top of the daggerboard case. It comes like this:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4103_zps5d76cf5e.jpg

I trimmed the ends to the correct length. When the front end is aligned with the daggerboard slot, the aft end is just short of the center thwart. Then I rounded over all the edges, again with a 1/4" bit in the router table. I took two scraps of 1/2" stock and wrapped them with packing tape. These spacers keep the top aligned with the slot; the tape is to keep them from being bonded in place by the epoxy. A 15 lb piece of lead holds the top in place while the epoxy cures.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4104_zps55a81bcb.jpg

All right. We're getting there. I have a few fun jobs remaining, and some real chores, but it won't be long before she touches water.

Next Time: Daggerboard, scraping and sanding, fitting the keel.

Rich Jones
07-26-2014, 07:16 AM
It's coming along nicely. You'll be hearing the gurgle of water racing under your keel in no time.
Your oarlock pads came out looking good. In my quest for the "perfect" oarlock pad, a few of them ended up in the woodstove before I was satisfied with the result.

Sailor
07-26-2014, 09:36 PM
Those pads are one of the details that if you don't get just right, the eye will never forgive you. Yours look great. :)

D. Handron
07-28-2014, 08:36 AM
Day 63: Daggerboard, Scraping and Sanding, Fitting the Keel

Today I cleaned up the dagerboard, scraping the squeeze out where I glued the cheeks on. I also smoothed the cheeks and rounded their corners. But that was not the main event.

Turning the hull right-side up was a major milestone. Today we turned it back upside down. Not as big a deal, but still exciting. First we carried it out of the shop.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4108_zps7d6895b4.jpg

"Hey! Where did it go?" Oh, it's over here in the grass.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4105_zpsf4752093.jpg

After a quick sweep up in the shop, we brought the boat back in and set her upside down on some sawhorses. The next big task is fitting the keel, but I need to clean out the bottom of the daggerboard trunk before we do that. When I cut the slot, I made sure to stay inside the lines. Now that the trunk is in place, and the hull is upside down again, I can use a flush-trim bit in my router to make the slot align exactly with the bedlogs. This wasn't quite as straightforward as it sounds. The epoxy squeeze out made the slot too narrow for the bit's roller guide. It's a 1/2" bit in a 9/16" slot, so there's not a lot of clearance. I ended up using a drill bit to open up enough room for the bit. Also, the bit is not very tall, only just 1/2" of cutting edge to clean up the 1/2" plywood. It took a little adjusting to get it set just right. But once I did, it worked like a charm.

The next thing was to trim the excess off the outer stem. My ryoba saw did this nicely.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4111_zpsf1aa687c.jpg

Hmm. Am I going to miss that screw?

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4112_zps4300ed48.jpg

Well, sort of. There's plenty room now to fit the keel. I'd drilled the screw holes from the inside before turning the hull upside down. We need one person to drill and screw into the hull from below while another holds the keel in place from above. Who is going to do what? In the end, my nine year old held from above, while I drilled and screwed. It came out looking nice.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4120_zps8fca42aa.jpg

Next time: Gluing the keel.

D. Handron
07-28-2014, 08:42 AM
Day 63: Bonus Features

Big brother and little brother sit under the boat and learn about the drill.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4115_zps67f45e90.jpg

Big sister and little sister wait for their next steps.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4118_zps0a30c975.jpg

D. Handron
07-28-2014, 10:15 AM
It's coming along nicely. You'll be hearing the gurgle of water racing under your keel in no time.
Your oarlock pads came out looking good. In my quest for the "perfect" oarlock pad, a few of them ended up in the woodstove before I was satisfied with the result.


Those pads are one of the details that if you don't get just right, the eye will never forgive you. Yours look great. :)

Thanks, Rich and Sailor, for your vote of confidence. I hear that water racing every time I look at her. It won't be long now before she's gets her feet wet.

Sailor's Brother
07-28-2014, 11:57 AM
I flinch as I was the photo of you cutting off the excess stem.. my biggest mistake... looks like you got your just right though... :-) looking good... wish I had a 2 car garage to build 2 separate boats in... I can barely fit my shellback into my garage... (it's sized for a smart car nothing else.. just so the builder can up the price by saying it has one...)
Oh well one day a 30x40 shop...

post 153... looks like someone's been playing in the paint :-) or maybe it's just sidewalk chalk :-)

D. Handron
07-28-2014, 01:33 PM
I flinch as I was the photo of you cutting off the excess stem.. my biggest mistake... looks like you got your just right though...

That incident was very much on my mind! I just laid the ryoba saw flat on the bottom and used that to guide the cut. Seems like it worked out okay. I put a screw right at the front of the keel, just in case, though.





post 153... looks like someone's been playing in the paint :-) or maybe it's just sidewalk chalk :-)

Actually he is one of the "Indians" at Adventures in Pioneer Living camp.

D. Handron
07-28-2014, 01:59 PM
Day 64: Gluing the Keel

First of all, guess what came in the mail today!

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4122_zps61b86ec5.jpg

Jamestown Distributors had "synthetic" oars "for those interested in price alone." For only $30 more, I got these varnished spruce oars. They are definitely still "economy" oars. You can see marks in the varnish where they were hung to dry, and the blades have some uneven grain:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4123_zps57c8ed16.jpg

That photo was shot with the light making it look it's absolute worst. They mostly look fine, which is good enough for me. After all, as Captain John says, "No one wants to row, who has ever sailed." These should get us home if necessary.

Now, as for gluing the keel, I made a point of stopping to take pictures during the process. First, I traced the edges of the keel, and then removed it. I put a coat of thin epoxy between the lines, and on the keel itself, and then a bead of epoxy in the center. I think I mentioned it before, but I strongly recommend using icing bags for this purpose. I'd tried plastic bags with the corners cut off before, and the smaller angle made a huge difference for me.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4125_zpsc9422295.jpg

You can see I made a little "bridge" to keep the forward end out of the epoxy while I positioned and began screwing the aft end. Once it was secured with screws, there was ample squeeze out.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4130_zpsa2058c07.jpg

I use cut off tongue depressors to clean up the squeeze out.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4131_zps52a17bcd.jpg

The result:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4132_zps041f3f57.jpg

So that's good.

On another note, I discovered an issue with my rudder. It's too thick for the rudder hardware. The plans call for a 1/2" core with 3/16" cheeks, or a 3/8" core with 1/4" cheeks. The kit supplies a 1/2" core with 1/4" cheeks. If I'd noticed this before gluing them on, I'd have planed them down on the "glue side." As it is, I'll have to rout or chisel out a recess for the hardware. Not too bad, but a bit of a setback time-wise when I am making a big push to get Falcon in the water.

Next Time: More work on the keel and rudder, filling and sanding.

Falcon1
07-28-2014, 04:10 PM
Looks good! I had the chance to row a shellback last week. Real nice. Then a guy in my class took one out for a sail. That thing moved! A great all-around boat, and it looks like you're doing a great job building. Also like the name...;)

Willin'
07-28-2014, 05:14 PM
The rudder thickness problem was a design issue, not a kit issue. I built my rudder exactly to spec and likewise the tiller. I had to mortise out some rather unsightly slots for the Dyer gudgeon arms. Also, I could just barely get the tiller cheeks over the rudder and the fit was so tight I didn't dare take it off for years.

I corrected the tiller issue once the cheeks failed by adding a thin shim of basswood, but hopefully you've checked yours before you glued it up.

Very nice looking work. Hope the kids are digging it, too.

D. Handron
07-29-2014, 10:02 AM
Day 65: Work on the Keel, Rudder, and Daggerboard; Filling and Sanding

The keel having been epoxied in place, I now fared its forward end into the stem. All my good shaping tools got to come out and play: plane, spokeshave, belt sander, sandpaper. I guess the power plane was left out.

With the boat upside down again, I went over the exterior with a microballoon mixture of epoxy, filling all the screw holes that needed filling, along with any other spots that needed it. I also crawled under the boat to scrape and sand the underside of the inwale. This was too awkward to do when the boat was up side up. It's still a bit awkward, but not as much so. I also drilled the holes near the stem for the painter. I debated skipping this, and devising some sort of cleat arrangement. The idea of drilling holes in the topsides is a bit unsettling, but then I figured this is a time-tested design, and I shouldn't go mucking around with it. So holes drilled.

I also gave the daggerboard a coat of epoxy.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4148_zps7077becd.jpg

It's a light coat. I poured a little on and then worked it in with a scraper. I'll go back over it again with another coat after it cures.

Taking note of Sailor's Brother's misadventures, I used the 1/4" ply tiller cheeks as patterns for new cheeks of 9mm meranti I happened to have lying around.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4134_zpsb062be2a.jpg

I've hung onto these oddly shaped scraps for a while, knowing that I'd find a use for them someday. Don't worry, though. I still have plenty of awkward scraps of plywood if I ever need more! I cut close to the line with the band saw, and after clamping them together, sanded down to the line with the belt sander set on it's side.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4140_zps57099cea.jpg

Not bad.

At this point I realized that in addition to being too thick for the rudder hardware, the cheek is too narrow where the lower gudgeon is meant to attach. Well, I figured, I have this extra bit of 1/4" ply, now. I can use that to make an extended base for the gudgeon,

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4147_zps33767bf7.jpg

which I then epoxied in place.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4149_zpsb06d01d9.jpg

It was only after this that I asked Sailor's Brother about his experience. He very helpfully informed me that I ought to have trimmed the tangs on the lower gudgeon so that they would fit.

Oh.

Next Time: Fitting the gudgeons on the rudder.

Sailor's Brother
07-29-2014, 02:01 PM
Day 64: Gluing the Keel

First of all, guess what came in the mail today!

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4122_zps61b86ec5.jpg

Jamestown Distributors had "synthetic" oars "for those interested in price alone." For only $30 more, I got these varnished spruce oars. They are definitely still "economy" oars. You can see marks in the varnish where they were hung to dry, and the blades have some uneven grain:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4123_zps57c8ed16.jpg

That photo was shot with the light making it look it's absolute worst. They mostly look fine, which is good enough for me. After all, as Captain John says, "No one wants to row, who has ever sailed." These should get us home if necessary.
.


Got the same oars from the same place... I was amazed at he packing, or overpacking, bubble wrap (enough to keep 2 kids occupied for an 8.5 hour trip from Ottawa Canada to Washington DC USA), plastic bags, cardboard... They are indeed total economy wood oars, leather or otherwise protect them.. I didn't and regret it already...
but Captain John is totally right... why row when you can sail... and I found she sails very well, even in the lightest of breezes I had steerage way...

D. Handron
07-29-2014, 10:40 PM
Day 66: Fitting the Gudgeons on the Rudder

A bit of a short day today. I was working on fitting the gudgeons to the rudder. The space between the tangs of the gudgeon is 7/8", while the rudder is just under an inch thick, something like 31/32". That's not too much to take off, but I still did the bulk of it with a router. I made a cardboard template of the area I need to rout out, and traced it onto the rudder. I used a combination square to ensure it was perpendicular to the edge, and I used a saddle square to follow the lines across the edge of the rudder and onto the other side, and lined up the template again and traced it. In the end, I was impressed with how well everything lined up.

After a few test cuts I got the router depth set just right. I made the test cuts in the area that the gudgeon would cover, so if any cuts were too deep they would not be visible, but in the end I crept right up on the correct depth without overshooting. Then I routed up the center and worked my way along the edges. Rather than go right up to the line, I stayed a little way inside, maybe a millimeter or a bit less. Then a couple taps on a chisel (one on the line, and one to lift out the waste) left a clean crisp edge.

I was called away for other duties before I finished, but it seems to be going well.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4163_zps87812c8a.jpg

Next Time: Filling, scraping, and sanding; completing the mast.

D. Handron
07-30-2014, 07:55 AM
Day 67: Filling, Scraping, and Sanding; Rounding the Mast

It's a Saturday, and the rest of the family is out of town, so I got a looong day of work in. Mostly filling scraping and sanding the hull, preparing it for finishing. I scraped and sanded all the spots I filled yesterday on the exterior, and then did a final sanding of the whole hull with 100 grit in the random orbit sander. Before turning the hull over, I put a coat of unthickened epoxy on the edges of the planks, taking great care not to mar any other part of the hull.

While that cured, I turned my attention to the mast, which has been sitting - 8 sided - next to the boat for some time now. I took it to 16 sides with a bench plane as described in the "how to build" book. I drew pencil lines around the mast every couple feet, and then started to plane down the corners. Take a couple passes on one corner, then turn the mast and work on the next. The corners all come down together gradually. This creates blank spaces in the pencil lines. When the blank spaces are the same length as the remaining pencil lines, the mast is 16-sided.

For the other spars, I went right to sandpaper at this point. The mast is bigger, and so I kept going. I 32-sided the mast, at least in principle, and then kept working around the mast, knocking down any edge I could see. Then I started working on the mast in 2 foot sections (roughly - the length of a pass with the plane). I would take four or five passes with the plane at different angles, and then rotate the mast a bit and repeat. This gave the mast a nice rounded appearance. After a while I switched to a block plane, to try to reduce the tear-out I was getting in a couple places. I got everything as round as I could before moving on to sanding. This, naturally, reduced the amount of sanding needed considerably.

I didn't get any pictures of the process, but I did capture the results.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4165_zpsd9443f79.jpg

And a closeup.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4166_zps9dec228c.jpg

I've saved a big bag of tinder for next winter's fires. Wood shavings will seem much more homey than newspaper, I imagine. Of course, I had to take a glamor shot.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4167_zpsf4f4045d.jpg

That's looking like a sailboat!

After scraping and sanding some drops epoxy at the plank edges, I managed to roll the boat off the sawhorses and onto the floor by myself, and went to work on the interior. I started scraping around the daggerboard case, mast step, and seat supports. I'd hit the seat supports once already, while the boat was upside down, but they needed more attention. I wish now that I had done this as I as was working along. It was hard work, and awkward, even with the boat on the ground. It was a little easier to reach, though, and much more stable than when the boat was propped up on the backbone. It gets harder as it goes. Once you scrape and sand all the squeeze out you can find, your eye picks up on more of it. You can see not only the smaller bits left behind, but other blemishes - in other parts of the boat - that you thought you had cleaned up. It seems like I'm developing the Super Power of seeing ever smaller blemishes, even the slightest discoloration.

At first this is a rewarding step. The hull begins to look more complete, less like a work in progress. But it's hot. My arms are tired. After a lot of breaks I decide that it's reached my exacting standard of "good enough." Before it's ready for finishing, though, there is one more thing that needs to be done.

As on the exterior, I want to coat the plywood edges with epoxy. The top of the sheer strake, the forward and aft ends of the daggerboard case, and the top of the transom all get a coat. Here it is:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4168_zpsd7ac3d7f.jpg

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4172_zps77a77bdb.jpg

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4170_zpse064fa8b.jpg

That's a good day's work.

Next Time: Finishing the hull with Deks Olje D1.

D. Handron
07-31-2014, 05:43 AM
Day 68: Finishing the Hull with Deks Olje D1

Well, but first I realize there are still some screw holes that aren't completely filled. So I give them a dollop of epoxy with microballoons. It's Sunday morning, so I can go to mass while that cures.

After mass (and lunch) the epoxy is still a bit rubbery, so I go back to the mast. The plans show a very sharp taper at the foot of the mast, I forget the dimensions exactly but it's something like 2 7/8" at the thwart, and 1 1/4" at the step. I thought that looked a little odd, and my batten wouldn't spring that much, so I gave it a much more gentle taper. But I still have to fit the mast into the hole in the step. My plan is to cut a round tenon at the bottom of the mast.

First, I scribe a line to mark the shoulder of the tenon. I made this about 3/16 less than the depth of the mortice in the mast step. Then I pared down to it on the waste side.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4176_zpsab49d3ed.jpg

Then I mark the depth of the cut on my saw

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4178_zps9b9b5dfb.jpg

and cut to that depth around the mast.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4180_zpsc3b349ae.jpg

Next, I chiseled away most of the waste.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4182_zps57e5271d.jpg

That was very satisfying. Then a rasp to smooth things up.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4183_zps036c5f67.jpg

You can see the tenon is a little out of round. That's partly because the mast is not exactly round. There's about 1/8" difference between the short diameter and the long diameter. More, though, it that my cut wasn't the exact same depth all around. I went several rounds of testing the fit in the boat (the mast conveniently fits up between the roof trusses) and trimming with the rasp and sometimes the chisel. When I was satisfied, I smoothed everything with 60 and 100 grit sandpaper.

Finally I decided the hull was ready for it's last final sanding. I used the random orbit sander where I could, and hand sanded where I had to to smooth the last round of filled screw holes. Then I began with the Deks Olje.

The plan is to coat the hull repeatedly, until it stops soaking up the finish. It has to sit for 15 minutes between coats. I can do about 1/4 of the interior in that time, so there is a bit of a scramble trying to keep up. In the end though, I have the whole interior saturated, and I wipe off the excess. Just in time to go out to dinner with my in-laws.

After dinner, my wife helps me turn over the hull, and I do the same again on the exterior. I think it was about midnight when I finished. This was a get-it-done-today task, since the oil finish has to cure for 3 days before going in the water. I'm intent on getting falcon wet as soon as humanly possible.

Here is the finished interior:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4200_zpscbdb5648.jpg

The D1 darkens the sapele planks and really makes the frame and stem pop. The effect is exaggerated here by the glare from the open garage door behind the photographer.

Next Time: More progress on the rudder, finishing the oarlock pads and belaying pin, holes in thwart for belaying pin.

heavyweather
07-31-2014, 05:37 PM
Shaping the mast sounds like a lot of work but fun. It's looking good though. (I am a lazy guy so I just use bamboo poles for mast, spar and tiller and all my shavings are from the thickness planer. :rolleyes:)

D. Handron
07-31-2014, 11:15 PM
Shaping the mast sounds like a lot of work but fun. It's looking good though. (I am a lazy guy so I just use bamboo poles for mast, spar and tiller and all my shavings are from the thickness planer. :rolleyes:)

Sometimes this sort of job can seem like a chore or distraction. "I finally finished rounding the mast, and now I've got to do this?!?" Often when I work on a big project, I get the feeling that the final 10% of details end up taking 90% of the time and effort, and distract (in terms of my effort) from the big picture of the project.

This particular detail I found immensely satisfying. I can't quite say why.

Actually, I've found nearly every part of this project to be very enjoyable. I make only one exception, and one partial exception. (1) I find scraping and sanding very uappealing, and (2) when we finished with the planking, I was glad to be done with it. This, I think, had more to do with the state of progress on my bigger boat, where I'd also just finished planking.

D. Handron
08-01-2014, 11:46 AM
Day 69: Rudder Progress, Holes in Thwart for Belaying Pin, Finishing Holes and Belaying Pin

Today I finished routing the recesses in the rudder for the gudgeons. Here s a trial fit of the rudder hardware:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4191_zpsa7571842.jpg

It's not what I would have designed from scratch, but I don't think it looks too bad. I'm thinking of an episode of Parks and Recreation wherein the crew are trying to furnish a restaurant to meet a deadline. One character, Ron, is building hand made chairs. After he smashes one, the others ask why he did that. Ron replies, "It was too perfect. It looked machine made!" Now I won't have to worry about that. (If that were ever a concern.)

After that, I gave the rudder a complete sanding. While all that was going on, I was also maintaining an every-15-minute schedule with the Deks Olje D1. Though I had drilled the mast hole in the forward thwart, I never drilled the hole for the belaying pin. So that needed doing. The plans show one hole just to port of the mast. I drilled a second one just to starboard. It seemed like that would be useful to allow the sail to be set up on either side of the mast.

The inside of hte holes needed to be finished with D1. The end grain in the mast step also needed a little more, too. I put five or six coats in the holes, and also on the belaying pin itself. The hardest part: remembering to restart the 15 minute timer after each coat.

Next Time: Finishing the oarlock pads, fitting the tiller to the rudder, attaching the pintle to the transom.

Roy Morford
08-02-2014, 11:23 AM
Looking good. Can you tell us where you obtained the rudder hardware? Thanks.

D. Handron
08-02-2014, 10:13 PM
Looking good. Can you tell us where you obtained the rudder hardware? Thanks.

Thanks, Roy. The rudder hardware came with the kit, but you can buy it separately from the Wooden Boat Store. It's at http://www.woodenboatstore.com/product/Rudder_Mounting_Hardware.

It's really quite clever. The lower gudgeon has a split end, so you can turn it sideways and slide it onto the rod, and when you turn the rudder vertical, it locks in place and you can slide the upper gudgeon onto the rod.

D. Handron
08-02-2014, 11:44 PM
Day 70: Finishing the Oarlock Pads, Fitting the Tiller to the Rudder, Attaching the Pintle to the Transom

Ugh. The internet ate my first iteration of this post. Forgive me if this seems a little terse.

The oarlock pads got the D1 treatment today. I removed them from the gunwale for finishing. I didn't epoxy them in place. They didn't seem like they wanted it.

I also gave the belaying pin several more coats with D1. The oil must have soaked in over night, as it was looking dried out in places.

I also attached the pintle to the transom.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4198_zps6cb22d7d.jpg

The most interesting thing I did was work on the tiller. The tiller is detachable from the rudder. A screw through the tiller cheeks sets into a notch in the tiller, and when the tiller is set down over the head of the rudder, everything is locked in place until the tiller is lifted again. A piece of copper pipe protects the rudder from the threads of the screw.

First I had to enlarge the notch in the tiller, so the pipe could fit all the way in. A forstner bit and rasp took care of that.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4192_zps3120adec.jpg

Then I drilled the screw holes in the tiller cheeks and lined everything up, clamping the cheeks to the tiller.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4193_zps6571ddbf.jpg

That looks good, so I mark the position of the cheeks on the tiller.

Next it's time to begin shaping the tiller. First I use my makeshift router table to "8-side) the tiller, using a beveling bit.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4194_zpsfd55a75c.jpg

Then I set about rounding things off, with a spokeshave and then sandpaper.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4195_zps62a35891.jpg

That looks pretty good. I think it is not quite there, but it is getting late, and I think it's best to stop for now and sleep on it. Otherwise I'm pretty sure mistakes will happen.

Next Time: Completing the rudder and tiller, setting up the rig, fitting the brass rubbing strip on the keel.

Roy Morford
08-03-2014, 09:40 PM
Thanks for the info on the rudder hardware. Now you've explained it I can see how it works. I was stumped at first.

D. Handron
08-04-2014, 06:27 AM
Day 71: Rudder, Tiller, Rig, and Rubbing Strip

A long day of work, today. I started with a coat of epoxy on the daggerboard. It had one coat, very thin, applied with a scraper, so the grain of the wood could still be felt. One more coat will help it stand up to abuse. The rudder also gets a coat of epoxy at the same time.

After giving the tiller a little more thought, I just marked a line around the tiiller, just in forward of the cheeks, and evened up the bevels.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4196_zpsf4aa08da.jpg

I'll sand to round over the edges after I glue the cheeks on, making a nice transition from square section at the rudder, to 8-sided, and then to round. One last bit of work on the tiller cheeks: Just like I routed a groove for the rudder hardware to fit over the rudder I used the router to pare down the inside of the tiller cheeks where they extend past the tiller handle, which is slightly narrower than the rudder head. This will allow the tiller to slide easily over the rudder. I take away about 1mm from each 9mm cheek, which should still leave it stronger than the 1/4" (6mm) ply that others have found undersized.

While all that is curing, I turn to the rig. I've read this section to the "how to build" repeatedly. I've never had any experience with a lug rig before, so I'm not quite sure how it will go. I've got everything ready. I don't have Ashley's Book of Konts, but this book has all the knots I really need.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4221_zps1bf15fb8.jpg

We carry the boat out into the yard.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4206_zpsfa32e6fa.jpg

She gets her thwarts back

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4207_zpsd6b03355.jpg

and her oarlock pads

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4207_zpsd6b03355.jpg

and even her oars!

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4209_zps9fbacec5.jpg

Rich Jones
08-04-2014, 06:43 AM
Well done!! Did you notice that once the oarlock pads were installed and the boat officially finished, that she was immediately christened with sunlight? A very good omen, indeed!

D. Handron
08-04-2014, 06:58 AM
Day 71: Continued

I get the spars and sail are ready in the boat.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4211_zpsd551c7ac.jpg

And I start following instructions. It makes more sense when I have everything in front of me, and I don't run into any major snags. Except the weather. I take a few rain breaks as i work.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4212_zps85cec665.jpg

But the sun comes back quickly. Before long, we're ready for the magic moment.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4214_zps7dfc60de.jpg

And there is a fully rigged Shellback Dinghy.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4220_zpse2bc62b5.jpg


While I'm waiting for the epoxy I applied earlier to finish curing, I drilled out the holes in the gudgeons. They were too small for the copper nails to fit through. Once epoxy has cured, I turn back to the rudder and tiller.

The tiller has all the epoxy glop scraped and sanded off. I don't even need the heat gun, since it's still at the softer, "green," stage of curing. That's a nice treat. I'd taken a moment earlier to bevel the edges of the tiller cheeks, and now I give a final sanding to smooth and round everything. It's ready for it's D1 finishing. I start the 15-minute cycles while I finish up everything else. I also give the belaying pin a few more coats. It seems to soak up as much as I'm willing to put on it.

The rudder hardware is a tighter fit, now that there is a coat of epoxy on the rudder, but I coax it into place. Then I get out my big box of metal working stuff.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4224_zps133fbdf0.jpg

It has a picture of a sailboat on the top, to remind me what I'm doing. I drill through the rudder for the copper nails, trim them to length with a hack saw, and rivet their heads with a ball peen hammer. Strangely, I neglected to take a photo of the result.

With the evening drawing to a close, I remember the brass rubbing strip. There are two pieces to make up the needed length, one about 10 feet long, and another about two and a half feet. After wrestling with it for a while, I begin with a screw in the aft end.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4227_zps9fdf6530.jpg

From here I bend the strip around the hard turn of the keel, and begin screwing every 5 1/2" or so. There is a lot of going back and forth with drill bits: one bit to drill the hole through the brass for the shank, one to counter sink for the head of the screw, and a third to drill the keel for the threads. If I had it to do a second time, it would go much more smoothly. When I get to the transition from the longer strip to the shorter, which occurs pretty close to the waterline at the stem, I realize that it would have been clever to put the shorter piece aft, hiding the joint well under the water, and making the awkward work of fitting the strip to the keel a little more comfortable.

In the end, though, it's done.

Next Time: The flight of the falcon.

D. Handron
08-04-2014, 07:00 AM
Well done!! Did you notice that once the oarlock pads were installed and the boat officially finished, that she was immediately christened with sunlight? A very good omen, indeed!

You're right. A ray of light shining through the clouds, just like in the movies!

Garth Jones
08-04-2014, 07:50 AM
She's looking great. Are you going to be sailing on Lake Arthur next weekend? I am hoping to be up there on Saturday.

D. Handron
08-04-2014, 11:27 PM
Day 72: July 31, 2014.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4231_zps89f88bff.jpg

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4235_zps48c95084.jpg

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4249_zps3b5e3321.jpg

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4234_zps41b246db.jpg

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4247_zpsa4834f5c.jpg

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4257_zps1435e337.jpg

Sailor's Brother
08-05-2014, 07:09 AM
Y>

Looking good :-)

D. Handron
08-05-2014, 09:46 PM
She's looking great. Are you going to be sailing on Lake Arthur next weekend? I am hoping to be up there on Saturday.

We were out at Moraine last Thursday and Saturday. We'll be traveling this weekend, but I'll let you know when we're going back to Lake Arthur.

Larks
08-06-2014, 12:02 AM
Fantastic!!! Congratulations on the launch!

Does she have a name? Not the "Handron Collider" perhaps (or is that a stale joke?) |:)

heavyweather
08-06-2014, 06:40 AM
The name is "falcon" I believe.

Congratulations on the launch!

Steamboat
08-06-2014, 06:56 PM
Beautiful job & congrats on the launch! Crew looks happy too!

D. Handron
08-08-2014, 09:55 AM
Thanks for the well wishes everyone. Her name is Falcon. That name still needs to be painted on her transom. There are a few other things that were overlooked in the final run-up to get her in the water before the end of July.

(1) I put the brass half-oval on the keel without any bedding compound. I'm thinking of sailing her that way for the rest of the season, and bedding it properly over the winter. Is that a terrible idea?

(2) Likewise with the oarlock pads. They are just screwed to the gunwales, not glued or bedded. I don't remember seeing anything in the "how to build" book about either glue or bedding compound. How have other builders handle this?

(3) I never cut the stem to any particular shape. There is interest among the crew in having some sort of falcon inspired carving, but I haven't come up with anything I'm really pleased with yet. Nor do I have any experience with wood carving. I'm not sure the laminated stem, with it's inconsistent grain pattern, is a great place to start...

(4) I finished the whole boat with Deks Olje D1. I think over the winter I may apply the glossy second phase, D2, to the thwarts and spars. From the instructions on the can, I don't think this will have any issues. I'll touch them up with D1, and then proceed to D2, as per the instructions.

There may be a few other thinks that were put off. These are the big tickets, though.

Junkyard Dog
08-08-2014, 01:25 PM
Congratulations on the launch! Well done.

Re. the Deks Olje, your plan ahould work fine. No problemo.

timo4352
08-08-2014, 03:56 PM
congratulations on the launch and a job well done.
this was really a fast build.

D. Handron
08-11-2014, 10:49 AM
Okay, I've been out on Falcon a few times now, and I've got some updates for you all. First of all, there was a discussion on Sailor's Brother's thread about floatation. Here's what I've been using for floatation for our first few times out.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4264_zps17630442.jpg

They are water resistant stuff sacks filled with trash bags stuffed with bubble wrap and styrofoam insulation. I stuff the larger one under the center thwart, and the smaller under the stern. My guess is that they are not sufficient to float the boat above the daggerboard case. I'll try to do some kind of test the next time we're out and see how much more is required.

I've also been working on some toggles to retain the rowlocks. For our first few outings, I've been using this

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4397_zps2d67e490.jpg

Effective, but not elegant or easy. It's some nylon line with loops in each end. First it has to be tucked through the inwale and the end is tucked through the smaller loop. Then it has to be stuffed up through the oarlock socket, through the hole in the end of the rowlock, and then looped around, as shown.

This is the revised version:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4398_zpsdd8176f0.jpg

The dowel slides into the rowlock socket, and then the cord and rowlock follow. If the rowlock is removed, the dowel keeps it from going far, but it can easily be slipped out again. It's a tight fit, I should probably use a slightly smaller dowel for the other side.

Now, on a less positive note, I will tell you all that if you beach the boat while forgetting the the rudder has not been unshipped, the rod mounted to the transom can bend out of shape.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4260_zps2de2bde9.jpg

When I got home, though, I was able to rig up a straightening apparatus:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4262_zps90d7fc05.jpg

This straightened it out pretty well. The rudder slip on or off, with only a little more difficulty than before. I may have another go at making it a little straighter.

Here it is back in action:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4263_zpsda806b9b.jpg

The washers that you see on the pintle in these photos are to correct for another problem. I must have mismeasured something, because when the rudder is set in place without them the tiller passes straight through the sculling notch, limiting the motion of the rudder. I don't think that is what was intended. The washers lift the tiller high enough to clear the transom top, and give a full range of motion. That's something else I'll have to revisit during the winter refit.

Sailor's Brother
08-11-2014, 11:48 AM
Okay, I've been out on Falcon a few times now, and I've got some updates for you all. First of all, there was a discussion on Sailor's Brother's thread about floatation. Here's what I've been using for floatation for our first few times out.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4264_zps17630442.jpg

They are water resistant stuff sacks filled with trash bags stuffed with bubble wrap and styrofoam insulation. I stuff the larger one under the center thwart, and the smaller under the stern. My guess is that they are not sufficient to float the boat above the daggerboard case. I'll try to do some kind of test the next time we're out and see how much more is required.

I've also been working on some toggles to retain the rowlocks. For our first few outings, I've been using this

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4397_zps2d67e490.jpg

Effective, but not elegant or easy. It's some nylon line with loops in each end. First it has to be tucked through the inwale and the end is tucked through the smaller loop. Then it has to be stuffed up through the oarlock socket, through the hole in the end of the rowlock, and then looped around, as shown.

This is the revised version:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4398_zpsdd8176f0.jpg

The dowel slides into the rowlock socket, and then the cord and rowlock follow. If the rowlock is removed, the dowel keeps it from going far, but it can easily be slipped out again. It's a tight fit, I should probably use a slightly smaller dowel for the other side.

Now, on a less positive note, I will tell you all that if you beach the boat while forgetting the the rudder has not been unshipped, the rod mounted to the transom can bend out of shape.

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4260_zps2de2bde9.jpg

When I got home, though, I was able to rig up a straightening apparatus:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4262_zps90d7fc05.jpg

This straightened it out pretty well. The rudder slip on or off, with only a little more difficulty than before. I may have another go at making it a little straighter.

Here it is back in action:

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4263_zpsda806b9b.jpg

The washers that you see on the pintle in these photos are to correct for another problem. I must have mismeasured something, because when the rudder is set in place without them the tiller passes straight through the sculling notch, limiting the motion of the rudder. I don't think that is what was intended. The washers lift the tiller high enough to clear the transom top, and give a full range of motion. That's something else I'll have to revisit during the winter refit.

you're looking at about 3 cubic feet of volume there in flotation... that will certainly bring it close, at least for an emptie boat... people/gear/sails... not a bad idea thogh to go with the stuff sacks, much cheaper than the designed flotation sacks and god knows SWMBO has ordered enough off amazon to keep me in packing peanuts for the remainder of my life...

I do like the purple bailing device you have shown in the first picture (bottom right corner)... While I'm sure it can clear the gunwhales of water... I suspect that it would take a LONG time to empty the boat fully...

I have also not managed to get the rudder in once or twice while coming in to a beach... I found in all those occasions that the rudder was lifted out of the pintle the breaking waves saw to that... was it a fast entry on relatively smooth water? curious that it bent...

D. Handron
10-14-2014, 03:03 PM
Well, I've had a chance to do some sailing in Falcon, though not too much recently. The weather and my schedule have both taken a turn fort he worse. I hope to get out this weekend. The lake where I've been sailing closes their ramps at the end of October, so there aren't too many more chances.

Here's some photos I've taken on the water:

On the Great Sacandaga Lake in upstate New York.
http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4340_zps5f7e235b.jpg

On Lake Arthur, in Moraine State Park in western Pennsylvania.
http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_4464_zps2e83087b.jpg

Another from Lake Arthur. This is the best/closest lake for sailing from my home base.
http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_1417_zps285a563e.jpg

I got off the water just in time that day!

Here are a couple "Action Shots"

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_1405_zps669fe7ec.jpg

http://i1255.photobucket.com/albums/hh638/handron/IMG_1411_zps42bc6a28.jpg

Did you pick out the difference between those two photos? If not, read on...

This is my first experience with a lug rig. It's been taking some getting used to. I really have to work on not pointing too high. A GPS track from one of my days early in August showed I was sailing about 75 degrees off the wind - pointing too high and making a lot of leeway. The last time I had a GPS going, I made an effort not to pinch the wind so much. The track showed I was traveling about 65 degrees off the wind. A lot better, but still room for improvement, I think.

The plans and the "How to Build" book show only three control lines for the sail: halyard, sheet, and downhaul. I've seen other lines prescribed by others. I've seen a line or ring to hold the yard close to the mast. I don't think that's necessary unless I take a reef, which I haven't had a reason to do yet. I suppose if I find I need it, I'll really need it. The one that interests me more is the one shown in the second action shot, holding the tack close to the mast. Without it the boom really wants to drive forward. (This is accentuated by my crew's inexperience with tensioning the halyard.) The arrangement I had that day helped some, but didn't seem to make a big difference.

Here's another thing I've noticed. When I hoist the sail, I get a wrinkle that goes from the tack to where the halyard attaches to the mast. Forward of this, there is less tension on the luff of the sail, and it tends to... well, luff, but earlier than I think it ought to. I tried shifting the halyard forward 4-6 inches on the yard, to see if the lever action of the rest of the sail would pull the luff tighter, but it didn't seem to make much difference. It did raise the sail a bit, which was nice for visibility and head bonkability, but I guess must increase the heeling moment. I'm not sure that's a big concern, though. At least it hasn't been.

Well, what do you think? Is the wrinkle I've observed a normal thing, or a problem? What about the extra lines to hold the tack and yard close to the mast? Are they necessary, or too much of a bother for a boat so small? I'm keen to hear any advice or ideas. With luck I can try them out this weekend and report back.

Falcon1
10-14-2014, 04:53 PM
Great photos, and a beautiful boat. I love the first Lake Arthur one! I'd like to try some fresh water sailing someday.

Cheers,

Mike

heavyweather
10-14-2014, 05:17 PM
I like "bonkability" :)

Willin'
10-14-2014, 06:04 PM
Regarding the sail wrinkle... I get that occasionally but can usually trim it out using the outhaul. You may want to experiment a bit with halyard/yard placement in finer increments than 4-6", that's a pretty critical point that takes a bit of patience to finesse.

I can't remember if the plans called for it or I did it on my own, but I sewed a brass ring to the clew and ran the boom through it, thereby keeping the clew close to the boom regardless of how slack the outhaul.

BTW, you nailed the breasthook crown and the quarter knees! I really sweated the breasthook and it didn't turn out nearly as nice as yours.

Actually, the fact that you can oil your boat speaks volumes about the superior skill and effort you put into it. She's a beautay!

D. Handron
10-15-2014, 06:47 AM
Regarding the sail wrinkle... I get that occasionally but can usually trim it out using the outhaul. ...
I can't remember if the plans called for it or I did it on my own, but I sewed a brass ring to the clew and ran the boom through it, thereby keeping the clew close to the boom regardless of how slack the outhaul.


Ah, I hadn't even thought of that. Seems like a good thought. Haul tighter on the outhaul to reduce the wrinkle, I presume. The "how to build" book mentions the sliding ring on the clew as an option. One that I'd planned to add, but haven't yet. I have some seizing holding the clew to the boom as well as the outhaul. I think I can slide that along a little bit. I can loosen it if need be.




You may want to experiment a bit with halyard/yard placement in finer increments than 4-6", that's a pretty critical point that takes a bit of patience to finesse.


I'm willing to believe this, but I didn't notice a big difference before and after. What should I be looking for? Are there signs that would indicate the halyard is too far forward or too far aft?

D. Handron
10-15-2014, 06:57 AM
BTW, you nailed the breasthook crown and the quarter knees! I really sweated the breasthook and it didn't turn out nearly as nice as yours.

Actually, the fact that you can oil your boat speaks volumes about the superior skill and effort you put into it. She's a beautay!

Thanks, Willin'. I'm proud of the work I did, but the kit deserves some credit. The breasthook and quarter knees came shaped and beveled as per the plans. The breasthook needed to be glued and fit around the stem and to have the ridge down the center rounded over, but I think all I did to the quarter knees was round over the edges.

There are a few things on the hull I'd like to cover with paint, but it was a family project. The family decided "It's made out of wood. It should look like wood!"

D. Handron
10-15-2014, 07:02 AM
Great photos, and a beautiful boat. I love the first Lake Arthur one! I'd like to try some fresh water sailing someday.

Cheers,

Mike

Thanks, Mike. Fresh water sailing is the only kind I've really done. I'm not sure what I'd do if I had to worry about tides and currents.

Your Swift is looking great, too. You chose great colors. Good luck with your launch. Is that today?

D. Handron
10-15-2014, 07:13 AM
you're looking at about 3 cubic feet of volume there in flotation... that will certainly bring it close, at least for an emptie boat... people/gear/sails... not a bad idea thogh to go with the stuff sacks, much cheaper than the designed flotation sacks and god knows SWMBO has ordered enough off amazon to keep me in packing peanuts for the remainder of my life...

...

I have also not managed to get the rudder in once or twice while coming in to a beach... I found in all those occasions that the rudder was lifted out of the pintle the breaking waves saw to that... was it a fast entry on relatively smooth water? curious that it bent...

The stuff sacks, as it turns out, are not as waterproof as they were 15 years ago. The peanuts in trash bags will still give good floatation, but a little will be lost. I'll want to come up with something better over the winter. Maybe just new stuff sacks.

I think what happened with the rudder was that when we came in to shore, it pushed up along the rod, and then when we pushed out again, the gudgeon was in the middle of the span, giving it plenty of leverage to bend the rod. My 2x4 lever-clamp contraption did a pretty good job in straightening, but it could be better. Hopefully, over the winter I'll have a chance to remove it straighten it out, and replace it in a way that doesn't require a stack of washers for the rudder to clear the sculling notch. I still need to see what measurements I messed there.

D. Handron
10-15-2014, 07:20 AM
I do like the purple bailing device you have shown in the first picture (bottom right corner)... While I'm sure it can clear the gunwhales of water... I suspect that it would take a LONG time to empty the boat fully...



The bailer is not the most efficient, but it's also useful for repelling boarders. In a small craft like this you have to be mindful of these kind of synergies.

JAPedersen
05-10-2018, 09:09 PM
I know this is an old thread ... but passing on

2018 Shellback Dinghy National Championship Brookline, Maine (http://forum.woodenboat.com/x-apple-data-detectors://79/1)

Dear Sailors, Builders, Family and Friends of the Shellback Dinghy National Championships,
The 10th annual Shellback Dinghy National Championships will be held September 27th- September 29th 2018 (http://forum.woodenboat.com/x-apple-data-detectors://80) in Brooklin, Maine for the awarding of the perpetual Frank A Pedersen Trophy.
The fleet will be based at Atlantic Boat, thanks again to the generosity of Cy Hannon, proprietor of Atlantic Boat. Cy writes “Our dock and floats are being upgraded, so bring a crowd and have fun.”
Two racing days will be held in Herrick Bay: Friday September 28th (http://forum.woodenboat.com/x-apple-data-detectors://81) and Saturday September 29 (http://forum.woodenboat.com/x-apple-data-detectors://82)th (http://forum.woodenboat.com/x-apple-data-detectors://82). (http://forum.woodenboat.com/x-apple-data-detectors://82) There will be a practice session Thursday September 27th (http://forum.woodenboat.com/x-apple-data-detectors://83) time: TBD
Registration & Welcome Reception will be held Thursday evening (http://forum.woodenboat.com/x-apple-data-detectors://84).
Saturday dinner (http://forum.woodenboat.com/x-apple-data-detectors://85) and awards presentation will be held at The Brooklin Inn. Thank you to Chip Angell for racing and hosting the awards dinner.