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CSJ
02-28-2001, 12:59 PM
Are there suppliers or companies that sell non standard sizes of plywood?

I would like to build a stich and glue kayak and want to avoid skarfing if at all possible.

CSJ
02-28-2001, 12:59 PM
Are there suppliers or companies that sell non standard sizes of plywood?

I would like to build a stich and glue kayak and want to avoid skarfing if at all possible.

CSJ
02-28-2001, 12:59 PM
Are there suppliers or companies that sell non standard sizes of plywood?

I would like to build a stich and glue kayak and want to avoid skarfing if at all possible.

Mike Keers
02-28-2001, 01:55 PM
If by non-standard you mean simply longer, almost all reputable marine plywood dealers offer plywood in sheets up to 16'. At a cost.
Some stuff is even available in 5x10 sheets.
Contact Boulter, Somerville Lumber, Condon, Edensaw, anyone like that.

For the thin stuff a kayak would take, you'll have to decide if the extra cost is worth it, compared to the minimal time and effort to scarf up the sheets yourself. It's really no big deal, many of us don't give a second thought to it, just grab the plane and do it. Or a power plane to get the most of it off with thicker stock. A hand plane takes only minutes with the thin stuff. It's all part of the satisfaction of building a boat.

BTW, quite a few years back I was looking for long ply for a dory bottom, and the distributor told me I could get any length up to 100 feet if I wanted...but only four feet wide. ;)

Go for it. mk

Mike Keers
02-28-2001, 01:55 PM
If by non-standard you mean simply longer, almost all reputable marine plywood dealers offer plywood in sheets up to 16'. At a cost.
Some stuff is even available in 5x10 sheets.
Contact Boulter, Somerville Lumber, Condon, Edensaw, anyone like that.

For the thin stuff a kayak would take, you'll have to decide if the extra cost is worth it, compared to the minimal time and effort to scarf up the sheets yourself. It's really no big deal, many of us don't give a second thought to it, just grab the plane and do it. Or a power plane to get the most of it off with thicker stock. A hand plane takes only minutes with the thin stuff. It's all part of the satisfaction of building a boat.

BTW, quite a few years back I was looking for long ply for a dory bottom, and the distributor told me I could get any length up to 100 feet if I wanted...but only four feet wide. ;)

Go for it. mk

Mike Keers
02-28-2001, 01:55 PM
If by non-standard you mean simply longer, almost all reputable marine plywood dealers offer plywood in sheets up to 16'. At a cost.
Some stuff is even available in 5x10 sheets.
Contact Boulter, Somerville Lumber, Condon, Edensaw, anyone like that.

For the thin stuff a kayak would take, you'll have to decide if the extra cost is worth it, compared to the minimal time and effort to scarf up the sheets yourself. It's really no big deal, many of us don't give a second thought to it, just grab the plane and do it. Or a power plane to get the most of it off with thicker stock. A hand plane takes only minutes with the thin stuff. It's all part of the satisfaction of building a boat.

BTW, quite a few years back I was looking for long ply for a dory bottom, and the distributor told me I could get any length up to 100 feet if I wanted...but only four feet wide. ;)

Go for it. mk

htom
02-28-2001, 03:27 PM
If your concern is that you don't want visible scarfs because you're going to use a bright (ie varnish) finish, be careful that those long plywood sheets don't come pre-scarfed at the factory.

htom
02-28-2001, 03:27 PM
If your concern is that you don't want visible scarfs because you're going to use a bright (ie varnish) finish, be careful that those long plywood sheets don't come pre-scarfed at the factory.

htom
02-28-2001, 03:27 PM
If your concern is that you don't want visible scarfs because you're going to use a bright (ie varnish) finish, be careful that those long plywood sheets don't come pre-scarfed at the factory.

Bruce Hooke
03-01-2001, 10:30 AM
If you do find a supplier I would just keep in mind that transporting a 4' x 16' sheet of, say, 1/8" plywood could be a bit of a challange.

Bruce Hooke
03-01-2001, 10:30 AM
If you do find a supplier I would just keep in mind that transporting a 4' x 16' sheet of, say, 1/8" plywood could be a bit of a challange.

Bruce Hooke
03-01-2001, 10:30 AM
If you do find a supplier I would just keep in mind that transporting a 4' x 16' sheet of, say, 1/8" plywood could be a bit of a challange.

Charlie J
03-01-2001, 09:07 PM
Bruce - having gotten a single sheet of oversized ply before I can tell you it's no challenge http://media5.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/smile.gif The company boxes it up (and you pay for it) and it comes on a truck (and you pay for it) Wound up paying about three times the actual price of the ply to get it into my hands.

Charlie J
03-01-2001, 09:07 PM
Bruce - having gotten a single sheet of oversized ply before I can tell you it's no challenge http://media5.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/smile.gif The company boxes it up (and you pay for it) and it comes on a truck (and you pay for it) Wound up paying about three times the actual price of the ply to get it into my hands.

Charlie J
03-01-2001, 09:07 PM
Bruce - having gotten a single sheet of oversized ply before I can tell you it's no challenge http://media5.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/smile.gif The company boxes it up (and you pay for it) and it comes on a truck (and you pay for it) Wound up paying about three times the actual price of the ply to get it into my hands.

Steve Lansdowne
03-02-2001, 09:39 PM
I was somewhat scared I'd mess up when I first tried to scarf my 4mm marine plywood, but after some on-line advice and building a small jig to help me get the angle right, I found it to be really fun. A sharp plane is, of course, needed, but I suggest you go ahead and do it yourself. Don't lose out on all the fun by buying pre-scarfed wood. It's expensive enough as it is!

Steve Lansdowne
03-02-2001, 09:39 PM
I was somewhat scared I'd mess up when I first tried to scarf my 4mm marine plywood, but after some on-line advice and building a small jig to help me get the angle right, I found it to be really fun. A sharp plane is, of course, needed, but I suggest you go ahead and do it yourself. Don't lose out on all the fun by buying pre-scarfed wood. It's expensive enough as it is!

Steve Lansdowne
03-02-2001, 09:39 PM
I was somewhat scared I'd mess up when I first tried to scarf my 4mm marine plywood, but after some on-line advice and building a small jig to help me get the angle right, I found it to be really fun. A sharp plane is, of course, needed, but I suggest you go ahead and do it yourself. Don't lose out on all the fun by buying pre-scarfed wood. It's expensive enough as it is!

Bruce Hooke
03-05-2001, 04:26 PM
c e jones: Good point. I was thinking in terms of getting it home in/on ones own vehicle. It certainly could be done on a roofrack by using some other lumber as support, but I think I would rather just scarf the stuff once I got it home...

Bruce Hooke
03-05-2001, 04:26 PM
c e jones: Good point. I was thinking in terms of getting it home in/on ones own vehicle. It certainly could be done on a roofrack by using some other lumber as support, but I think I would rather just scarf the stuff once I got it home...

Bruce Hooke
03-05-2001, 04:26 PM
c e jones: Good point. I was thinking in terms of getting it home in/on ones own vehicle. It certainly could be done on a roofrack by using some other lumber as support, but I think I would rather just scarf the stuff once I got it home...