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Mike Field
02-02-2001, 08:18 AM
Given my occupation, I was interested to see this photo of old timber blocks and other fittings in a magazine today. Can anyone hazard a guess as to how old they might be?

http://albums.photopoint.com/j/View?u=1231924&a=10671402&p=39834345

Mike Field
02-02-2001, 08:18 AM
Given my occupation, I was interested to see this photo of old timber blocks and other fittings in a magazine today. Can anyone hazard a guess as to how old they might be?

http://albums.photopoint.com/j/View?u=1231924&a=10671402&p=39834345

Mike Field
02-02-2001, 08:18 AM
Given my occupation, I was interested to see this photo of old timber blocks and other fittings in a magazine today. Can anyone hazard a guess as to how old they might be?

http://albums.photopoint.com/j/View?u=1231924&a=10671402&p=39834345

Eb
02-02-2001, 10:19 AM
Whatever their age, they look like they've been used.

Eb

Eb
02-02-2001, 10:19 AM
Whatever their age, they look like they've been used.

Eb

Eb
02-02-2001, 10:19 AM
Whatever their age, they look like they've been used.

Eb

Ian Wright
02-02-2001, 01:13 PM
Could be any age,,,, might even be brand new but "aged" for the photograph. odd that the chamfered edges are sharp and not rounded over by the maker,,,,and isn't that an aluminium shell block in the center?

IanW.

Ian Wright
02-02-2001, 01:13 PM
Could be any age,,,, might even be brand new but "aged" for the photograph. odd that the chamfered edges are sharp and not rounded over by the maker,,,,and isn't that an aluminium shell block in the center?

IanW.

Ian Wright
02-02-2001, 01:13 PM
Could be any age,,,, might even be brand new but "aged" for the photograph. odd that the chamfered edges are sharp and not rounded over by the maker,,,,and isn't that an aluminium shell block in the center?

IanW.

TomRobb
02-02-2001, 02:27 PM
The two w/ the holes look suspiciously like Schaffer or Harken, i.e., new or newish.

TomRobb
02-02-2001, 02:27 PM
The two w/ the holes look suspiciously like Schaffer or Harken, i.e., new or newish.

TomRobb
02-02-2001, 02:27 PM
The two w/ the holes look suspiciously like Schaffer or Harken, i.e., new or newish.

Mike Field
02-04-2001, 07:12 PM
I really wasn't trying to be a smart-arse with this question. I did know the answer in advance, although I could hardly believe it myself. But all these fittings eere actually salvaged about twenty years ago from the wreck of the Mary Rose. Mary Rose was a warship, Henry VIII's personal pride and joy, which overturned and sank in the Solent in 1545 when about to engage a French invasion force. She had been refitted not very long before, so I guess that means the blocks are getting on for 460 years old. Incredible!

But what I couldn't get over is how little different they are from the same thing made 400 years later. The one in the centre does look like a bit it might be aluminium, but I guess that's just the way the light's catching it. The "Harkens" I think must really be deadeyes, although I'd like a maritime historian's opinion -- the nearer one seems to have a chase around it for a strop.

The fiddle block and perhaps the small double in the front look as though they might be English oak by the grain, but I can't hazard a guess about the others. Elm or ash, perhaps? Does anyone with better knowledge of English timbers have any suggestion?

Mike Field
02-04-2001, 07:12 PM
I really wasn't trying to be a smart-arse with this question. I did know the answer in advance, although I could hardly believe it myself. But all these fittings eere actually salvaged about twenty years ago from the wreck of the Mary Rose. Mary Rose was a warship, Henry VIII's personal pride and joy, which overturned and sank in the Solent in 1545 when about to engage a French invasion force. She had been refitted not very long before, so I guess that means the blocks are getting on for 460 years old. Incredible!

But what I couldn't get over is how little different they are from the same thing made 400 years later. The one in the centre does look like a bit it might be aluminium, but I guess that's just the way the light's catching it. The "Harkens" I think must really be deadeyes, although I'd like a maritime historian's opinion -- the nearer one seems to have a chase around it for a strop.

The fiddle block and perhaps the small double in the front look as though they might be English oak by the grain, but I can't hazard a guess about the others. Elm or ash, perhaps? Does anyone with better knowledge of English timbers have any suggestion?

Mike Field
02-04-2001, 07:12 PM
I really wasn't trying to be a smart-arse with this question. I did know the answer in advance, although I could hardly believe it myself. But all these fittings eere actually salvaged about twenty years ago from the wreck of the Mary Rose. Mary Rose was a warship, Henry VIII's personal pride and joy, which overturned and sank in the Solent in 1545 when about to engage a French invasion force. She had been refitted not very long before, so I guess that means the blocks are getting on for 460 years old. Incredible!

But what I couldn't get over is how little different they are from the same thing made 400 years later. The one in the centre does look like a bit it might be aluminium, but I guess that's just the way the light's catching it. The "Harkens" I think must really be deadeyes, although I'd like a maritime historian's opinion -- the nearer one seems to have a chase around it for a strop.

The fiddle block and perhaps the small double in the front look as though they might be English oak by the grain, but I can't hazard a guess about the others. Elm or ash, perhaps? Does anyone with better knowledge of English timbers have any suggestion?

TomRobb
02-05-2001, 09:13 AM
Looks to me like the word Photorealism is an oxymoron.

TomRobb
02-05-2001, 09:13 AM
Looks to me like the word Photorealism is an oxymoron.

TomRobb
02-05-2001, 09:13 AM
Looks to me like the word Photorealism is an oxymoron.

Mike Field
02-17-2001, 08:13 AM
I've finally come to the conclusion that those "deadeyes" must really be euphroes, probably used for supporting hammocks. A euphroe would normally have a strop around it, just like a deadeye, but instead of a (single) lanyard being rove backwards and forwards through the holes, a series of single lines would probably have been deadended with stopper knots at each hole.

Perhaps.

Mike Field
02-17-2001, 08:13 AM
I've finally come to the conclusion that those "deadeyes" must really be euphroes, probably used for supporting hammocks. A euphroe would normally have a strop around it, just like a deadeye, but instead of a (single) lanyard being rove backwards and forwards through the holes, a series of single lines would probably have been deadended with stopper knots at each hole.

Perhaps.

Mike Field
02-17-2001, 08:13 AM
I've finally come to the conclusion that those "deadeyes" must really be euphroes, probably used for supporting hammocks. A euphroe would normally have a strop around it, just like a deadeye, but instead of a (single) lanyard being rove backwards and forwards through the holes, a series of single lines would probably have been deadended with stopper knots at each hole.

Perhaps.