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Curtism
04-16-2014, 10:53 AM
I have one of those stationary delta belt sanders that takes a 36" x 4" belt and the one that's on it is still sharp but it's old and the glue let go at the seam. Anyone know what sort of glue would hold up best for reattaching this?

Cuyahoga Chuck
04-16-2014, 11:00 AM
I think the posibilities are about zip. The belts are under fair tension and can get hot with concentrated pressure. The stuff the manufacturers use probably requires heat and pressure.

Curtism
04-16-2014, 11:10 AM
Due to the climate down here such things have a fairly short shelf life. There used to be a trick to doing this on ones that let go like this but, memory fails me.

I see Sears has decent 3m belts but you have to buy a 2 pack, which means by the time I get around to needing the second belt, it will probably let go as well.

And yes, I'm cheap as they get about such things.

Phillip Allen
04-16-2014, 11:40 AM
Due to the climate down here such things have a fairly short shelf life. There used to be a trick to doing this on ones that let go like this but, memory fails me.

I see Sears has decent 3m belts but you have to buy a 2 pack, which means by the time I get around to needing the second belt, it will probably let go as well.

And yes, I'm cheap as they get about such things.

put your extra belt in a zip lok ... maybe it will last longer

Jim Ledger
04-16-2014, 11:46 AM
It's not going to happen. Cut up the belts and use them for heavy duty hand sanding, the heavy backing makes for good detail sanding.

Paul Pless
04-16-2014, 12:21 PM
and to think i got called out for wanting to save some frozen joint compound. . .

Donn
04-16-2014, 12:53 PM
Not surprisingly, if you Google "How to re-glue sanding belts," you'll find a bunch of suggestions. The most common seems to be a combination of some sort of epoxy and either kevlar or Tyvek.

Here's one from the Fine Woodworking Forum:

FWW #94, June 1992, page 44, "Shopmade sanding belts," by Bill Skinner.


If you don't have that issue of the magazine, in summary the author said he'd been making belts for stroke sanders and smaller machines for more than 40 years. He used an angled butt joint with a strip of Kevlar cloth glued to the back of the belt with Hexcel Epolite 2461 epoxy resin, both of which were commonly used by boatbuilders. His procedure was to cut a length of cloth belt stock about 4" longer than required, overlap the ends and clamp it to yield the desired length, then make an angled cut through both layers with a sharp knife guided by a straightedge. The joint was reinforced with a 1" wide strip of Kevlar glued with a spoonful of resin/hardener. He put wax paper under the belt and over the Kevlar strip, clamped the joint with a short piece of 2x2 and let it set overnight.

Gib Etheridge
04-16-2014, 01:20 PM
I cut a 4 x 36 x 80 grit belt and TIII glued it to a backing board with 2 handles on it to make a long board sander for beveling and fairing the top of deck beams, a possible use for a broken belt.

john welsford
04-16-2014, 02:11 PM
3M have a specialised adhesive for that purpose. But its generally only sold in commercial quantities which makes it uneconomic for one offs.

John Welsford

David G
04-16-2014, 03:01 PM
I've looked into it, tried several methods, and abandoned the notion. Along the way, I did pick up the impression that better quality belts are less prone to such glue failure (and last longer)... so that might be a solution for the future. Of course... there's also moving to a more civilized climate to consider <G>

Keith Wilson
04-16-2014, 04:26 PM
A good-quality 3M 4" x 36" belt costs around $8. How much is your time worth?

oznabrag
04-16-2014, 04:49 PM
A good-quality 3M 4" x 36" belt costs around $8. How much is your time worth?

I have not bought any sanding belts in the past year or two, but I bought a box of ten, 80-grit, 4x24s for about $25 last time.

Are you buying your belts through your job?

Phil Y
04-16-2014, 04:58 PM
Maybe keep the sander in the fridge when its not in use.

Phil Y
04-16-2014, 04:59 PM
PS don't ha hate it when the bilge gets clogged up with boaty stuff?

John Meachen
04-16-2014, 05:07 PM
I used to know a man who used contact glue to make belts from reels of sandpaper.They worked but he had a lot of experience and they sting when they fly off if you get it wrong.

Curtism
04-16-2014, 05:10 PM
Shortly after Mr. Ledgers post I left for the last remaining Sears store in town and came back with two belts (not the 3M's but a chinese, er, chinsey world market no-name brand with butted joints and a piece of tape holding them together, "we dont have the stuff they show online, ya know") for $11.00.

I saved the old belt and, considering it's at least twice as thick as the ones I just bought and has a tapered overlap at least half as wide as the tape holding the others together, I'll most likely be trying some epoxy to piece it back together with.

Prolly ought to glue it up prior to trying the "new" ones, eh? Might save me some time, not that I'm in all that big a hurry, thankfully.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ovum-GjYWKQ

Paul Pless
04-16-2014, 05:17 PM
Maybe keep the sander in the fridge when its not in use.right between the used but not cleaned paint rollers and the pie tin of uncured epoxy?

Curtism
04-16-2014, 05:25 PM
right between the used but not cleaned paint rollers and the pie tin of uncured epoxy?

And the 8 year old Corian adhesive.

How much did that bucket of joint compound run ya? Can we start betting whether you'll use it up before it freezes again yet?

:D

Keith Wilson
04-16-2014, 05:30 PM
Epoxy softens with even moderate heat. Sanding belts get hot. Look here. (http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=sr_nr_p_89_0/189-5594767-2516253?rh=n%3A228013%2Ck%3A4+x+24+sanding+belts%2 Cp_89%3A3M&keywords=4+x+24+sanding+belts&ie=UTF8&qid=1397687278&rnid=2528832011)

Paul Pless
04-16-2014, 05:37 PM
How much did that bucket of joint compound run ya? $10.85:o


Can we start betting whether you'll use it up before it freezes again yet?

:D
I bought the powder this time. :D

pipefitter
04-16-2014, 11:26 PM
Harbor freight has belts for those machines, cheap. The 6x48's are under 20 bucks for five of them, or something like that. I hear you can stick them back together with that fiber reinforced packing tape from the post office in a pinch but the tape has to be as long as the belt to avoid a bump in it.

I use those sanders here in FL. and have no problem with the belts coming apart. My hand held belt sander has had the same belt on it for at least 8 years, since I rarely use it anymore. I have both a 4 x 36, and 6 x 48 here at home and I just keep the belts in the plastic they are packaged in.

Just got a case of 3" x 132" 3M belts gifted to me and I know those are at least 10 years old and are still adhered well. 2 layers of these (obscured by the cardboard under what shows in the photo) of various grit in this case, from 40 to 320. Also got the wheels to the actual grinder these go to. These turn at a much higher rate of speed than the 4 x 36 or 6 x 48 types. 'Nearly' direct drive on a 3hp, 3450 RPM motor!
http://i99.photobucket.com/albums/l309/tigmaster/IMG_2555_zpse3f9a9a3.jpg

Todd Bradshaw
04-16-2014, 11:46 PM
And never throw out old shoes if they have a natural crepe sole. They make great belt cleaners and will greatly extend the working like of the grit.

pipefitter
04-17-2014, 12:35 AM
And never throw out old shoes if they have a natural crepe sole. They make great belt cleaners and will greatly extend the working like of the grit.

Belt cleaners are definitely a must. I even use one on the little dremel type drum sanders 'before' they get clogged.

David G
04-17-2014, 08:48 AM
And never throw out old shoes if they have a natural crepe sole. They make great belt cleaners and will greatly extend the working like of the grit.

And... if you don't happen to have any old crepe-soled shoes around... woodworker's supply houses (wholesale and retail) sell sticks of similar material. Roughly 2" X 2" X 8". I keep one handy to the belt sanders at all times. Use it often, and you really extend both the life and the effectiveness of your belts.

David W Pratt
04-17-2014, 11:27 AM
Gronicle cement?
Crazy Glue
I'd try the zip-loc/freezer combo
Good Luck

Tom Wilkinson
04-17-2014, 12:35 PM
I have recently had this issue with a whole pile of klingspor belts. I stocked up on them at one time and now each belt is good for 5 to ten mins maximum. I had no idea they had an approximate 1 year shelf life. It isn't well advertised.

Cuyahoga Chuck
04-17-2014, 12:51 PM
And never throw out old shoes if they have a natural crepe sole. They make great belt cleaners and will greatly extend the working like of the grit.

I have a regular supply of those black rubber snubbers that fall off automobile suspensions that I use for cleaning belts . I find 'em when I'm out jogging along with other useful items like screwdrivers, wrenches and once even a crosscut saw that was still sharp altho' it was slightly bent from being run over.

John of Phoenix
04-17-2014, 12:55 PM
I have recently had this issue with a whole pile of klingspor belts. I stocked up on them at one time and now each belt is good for 5 to ten mins maximum. I had no idea they had an approximate 1 year shelf life. It isn't well advertised.Thanks for the info. I'm surprised to see on Google that it's quite a problem and even the company says one year from invoice date. I have Norton belts that are 5-8 years old that work fine. Maybe it's the dry heat.









I intend on ordering a mass quantity of your products. What is the shelf life of your abrasives?

As to most abrasives, the adhesive manufacturer's warranty the adhesive properties of their products (glues and tapes) for one year from the date of activation. Therefore, you most likely will not find any manufacturer who will warranty belts or sticky back discs for more than one year from invoice date on the product they sell you. It is our recommendation that you buy no more of these items than you can turn over in six to eight months, but we do warranty them for a year from invoice date. We also recommend you store them somewhere that is heat and humidity regulated as both those factors can adversely effect the adhesives as well as the backings. Please click here (http://www.klingspor.com/storagetips.htm) for storage tips on handling coated sandpaper or abrasives.

Tom Wilkinson
04-17-2014, 01:20 PM
The frustrating thing is mine are stored in a climate controlled shop, in a closed cabinet, not like they are in a damp basement or out in the truck, jobsite or a shed. The information is available on their website, but seems like you really have to look for it to fine it. If it is really that sensitive, (and it seems it is) they should be more up front about it. They certainly aren't marked with an expiration date.