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Jim Hillman
11-07-2000, 09:53 AM
I have a Stanley spokeshave with a straight or flat iron. I recently sharpened the iron with a hollow ground from my bench grinder and finished-up on a waterstone. When re-assembled with the bevel facing up, it did a poor job in all respects. I turned the blade over (bevel down)and it works like a charm! What have I done wrong??

Jim Hillman
11-07-2000, 09:53 AM
I have a Stanley spokeshave with a straight or flat iron. I recently sharpened the iron with a hollow ground from my bench grinder and finished-up on a waterstone. When re-assembled with the bevel facing up, it did a poor job in all respects. I turned the blade over (bevel down)and it works like a charm! What have I done wrong??

Jim Hillman
11-07-2000, 09:53 AM
I have a Stanley spokeshave with a straight or flat iron. I recently sharpened the iron with a hollow ground from my bench grinder and finished-up on a waterstone. When re-assembled with the bevel facing up, it did a poor job in all respects. I turned the blade over (bevel down)and it works like a charm! What have I done wrong??

Wayne Jeffers
11-07-2000, 10:47 AM
Jim, Your principal problem is that you violated rule no. 1: Spokeshaves are like boats -- the best ones are wooden.

Wayne

Wayne Jeffers
11-07-2000, 10:47 AM
Jim, Your principal problem is that you violated rule no. 1: Spokeshaves are like boats -- the best ones are wooden.

Wayne

Wayne Jeffers
11-07-2000, 10:47 AM
Jim, Your principal problem is that you violated rule no. 1: Spokeshaves are like boats -- the best ones are wooden.

Wayne

Tom Lathrop
11-07-2000, 10:57 AM
Jim,
You have already corrected the mistake.
Unless I have been doing this wrong for fifty years, the bevel goes down. Anyway I don't think I would ever hollow grind an iron that worked with the bevel up.

Tom Lathrop
11-07-2000, 10:57 AM
Jim,
You have already corrected the mistake.
Unless I have been doing this wrong for fifty years, the bevel goes down. Anyway I don't think I would ever hollow grind an iron that worked with the bevel up.

Tom Lathrop
11-07-2000, 10:57 AM
Jim,
You have already corrected the mistake.
Unless I have been doing this wrong for fifty years, the bevel goes down. Anyway I don't think I would ever hollow grind an iron that worked with the bevel up.

Scott Rosen
11-07-2000, 11:26 AM
In case you haven't seen it yet, the current issue of WB has an informative article about proper use of planes and spokeshaves. It may answer your question.

Scott Rosen
11-07-2000, 11:26 AM
In case you haven't seen it yet, the current issue of WB has an informative article about proper use of planes and spokeshaves. It may answer your question.

Scott Rosen
11-07-2000, 11:26 AM
In case you haven't seen it yet, the current issue of WB has an informative article about proper use of planes and spokeshaves. It may answer your question.

Ed Harrow
11-07-2000, 12:35 PM
Not to mention a picture of a $3500 plane. A HAND plane, not some old Powermatic...

Ed Harrow
11-07-2000, 12:35 PM
Not to mention a picture of a $3500 plane. A HAND plane, not some old Powermatic...

Ed Harrow
11-07-2000, 12:35 PM
Not to mention a picture of a $3500 plane. A HAND plane, not some old Powermatic...

Jim Hillman
11-07-2000, 12:45 PM
http://media4.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/redface.gif, guess I'll have to steal that issue back from my father! Guess I'll also get him a gift subscription. I looked at "Hand Tools: by Aldren, but it did'nt discuss bevel orientation for the spokeshave. Thanks for the help!

Jim

Jim Hillman
11-07-2000, 12:45 PM
http://media4.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/redface.gif, guess I'll have to steal that issue back from my father! Guess I'll also get him a gift subscription. I looked at "Hand Tools: by Aldren, but it did'nt discuss bevel orientation for the spokeshave. Thanks for the help!

Jim

Jim Hillman
11-07-2000, 12:45 PM
http://media4.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/redface.gif, guess I'll have to steal that issue back from my father! Guess I'll also get him a gift subscription. I looked at "Hand Tools: by Aldren, but it did'nt discuss bevel orientation for the spokeshave. Thanks for the help!

Jim

Kermit
11-08-2000, 08:11 AM
Ayup--bevel down.

Kermit
11-08-2000, 08:11 AM
Ayup--bevel down.

Kermit
11-08-2000, 08:11 AM
Ayup--bevel down.

Jim Hillman
11-08-2000, 10:44 AM
OK, so I stole that issue back and read the article. If I read it right, I should regrind the bevel on my low angle block plane to about 30 degrees and put it bevel down for a better effect on end grain, or, should I retain legal council for the eventual appearence of the "Plane Police" who will drag me away for plane abuse and plain ignorance...

Jim

Jim Hillman
11-08-2000, 10:44 AM
OK, so I stole that issue back and read the article. If I read it right, I should regrind the bevel on my low angle block plane to about 30 degrees and put it bevel down for a better effect on end grain, or, should I retain legal council for the eventual appearence of the "Plane Police" who will drag me away for plane abuse and plain ignorance...

Jim

Jim Hillman
11-08-2000, 10:44 AM
OK, so I stole that issue back and read the article. If I read it right, I should regrind the bevel on my low angle block plane to about 30 degrees and put it bevel down for a better effect on end grain, or, should I retain legal council for the eventual appearence of the "Plane Police" who will drag me away for plane abuse and plain ignorance...

Jim

Tom Lathrop
11-08-2000, 06:02 PM
Jim,

The "Tool Police" have been kind of quiet on the forum since someone killed a fellow for setting his plane down on the bench on its shoe. The the executioner was dispatched by someone else who claimed that that was the proper way to store a plane. My shop is booby trapped to snare such uptight folk before they can get violent.

Tom Lathrop
11-08-2000, 06:02 PM
Jim,

The "Tool Police" have been kind of quiet on the forum since someone killed a fellow for setting his plane down on the bench on its shoe. The the executioner was dispatched by someone else who claimed that that was the proper way to store a plane. My shop is booby trapped to snare such uptight folk before they can get violent.

Tom Lathrop
11-08-2000, 06:02 PM
Jim,

The "Tool Police" have been kind of quiet on the forum since someone killed a fellow for setting his plane down on the bench on its shoe. The the executioner was dispatched by someone else who claimed that that was the proper way to store a plane. My shop is booby trapped to snare such uptight folk before they can get violent.

Ed Harrow
11-08-2000, 07:55 PM
Geez, I store my block planes in old thorlo socks, at least if I'm taking them somewhere.

Ed Harrow
11-08-2000, 07:55 PM
Geez, I store my block planes in old thorlo socks, at least if I'm taking them somewhere.

Ed Harrow
11-08-2000, 07:55 PM
Geez, I store my block planes in old thorlo socks, at least if I'm taking them somewhere.

Jim Hillman
11-10-2000, 04:37 PM
Ed, I only own one pair of socks and they're my "Sunday -go-to-meetin" socks... http://media4.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/smile.gif

Anyway, curious as to how the blade ended upside down in my spokeshave (I mean, it could'nt be me , no!) I went to the shop where I purchased it, big mistake! I was about 100 yards from the store when the Sirens began their sweet song, they promised sturdy tools, sharp blades and many accesories. Entranced by their melody I was swept upon the shoals and into the store, wallet in hand. Forgotten was the old spokeshave with the backwards blade (how embarassing!) My eyes were filled with the gleam of steel, my nose with the aroma of wood shavings and oiled metal. I woke up back at the office, although I don't remember how I got back, with a concave spokeshave and a flush saw.

Have a great weekend,

Jim

Jim Hillman
11-10-2000, 04:37 PM
Ed, I only own one pair of socks and they're my "Sunday -go-to-meetin" socks... http://media4.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/smile.gif

Anyway, curious as to how the blade ended upside down in my spokeshave (I mean, it could'nt be me , no!) I went to the shop where I purchased it, big mistake! I was about 100 yards from the store when the Sirens began their sweet song, they promised sturdy tools, sharp blades and many accesories. Entranced by their melody I was swept upon the shoals and into the store, wallet in hand. Forgotten was the old spokeshave with the backwards blade (how embarassing!) My eyes were filled with the gleam of steel, my nose with the aroma of wood shavings and oiled metal. I woke up back at the office, although I don't remember how I got back, with a concave spokeshave and a flush saw.

Have a great weekend,

Jim

Jim Hillman
11-10-2000, 04:37 PM
Ed, I only own one pair of socks and they're my "Sunday -go-to-meetin" socks... http://media4.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/smile.gif

Anyway, curious as to how the blade ended upside down in my spokeshave (I mean, it could'nt be me , no!) I went to the shop where I purchased it, big mistake! I was about 100 yards from the store when the Sirens began their sweet song, they promised sturdy tools, sharp blades and many accesories. Entranced by their melody I was swept upon the shoals and into the store, wallet in hand. Forgotten was the old spokeshave with the backwards blade (how embarassing!) My eyes were filled with the gleam of steel, my nose with the aroma of wood shavings and oiled metal. I woke up back at the office, although I don't remember how I got back, with a concave spokeshave and a flush saw.

Have a great weekend,

Jim

Bayboat
11-10-2000, 04:57 PM
I'm for abolishing the "Tool Police." The general rule is whatever works best for the individual. If you want to hit a caulking iron with a square mallet, why not? (I can hear Dave Fleming gasping for air). As for spokeshaves, Jim, you arrived at the right conclusion. Stanley and Record spokeshaves are bevel down. The American and British wooden ones (yes, Wayne, they are indeed best) with the ears on the blade are bevel up. The Japanese wooden ones, without ears, are bevel down. About block planes: the metal bodied ones (Record, Stanley, Lie-Nielsen) should be sharpened and honed for the bevel up. They work best that way on end or cross grain in hardwoods. The Lie-Nielsen #62 low angle jack (really a giant block plane) also has the bevel up, as do the smaller version, which they call a smoothing plane, and their skew-blade block plane. However, good German wooden block planes (E.C.E.) have the bevel down. Probably none of this is gospel, but that's the way the manufacturers make them. Ya pays yer money.... A good source for information on all kinds of planes, shaves, etc. is "The Handplane Book," by Garrett Hack. There are many books on sharpening; a good one is "The Complete Guide to Sharpening," by Leonard Lee.



[This message has been edited by Bayboat (edited 11-10-2000).]

Bayboat
11-10-2000, 04:57 PM
I'm for abolishing the "Tool Police." The general rule is whatever works best for the individual. If you want to hit a caulking iron with a square mallet, why not? (I can hear Dave Fleming gasping for air). As for spokeshaves, Jim, you arrived at the right conclusion. Stanley and Record spokeshaves are bevel down. The American and British wooden ones (yes, Wayne, they are indeed best) with the ears on the blade are bevel up. The Japanese wooden ones, without ears, are bevel down. About block planes: the metal bodied ones (Record, Stanley, Lie-Nielsen) should be sharpened and honed for the bevel up. They work best that way on end or cross grain in hardwoods. The Lie-Nielsen #62 low angle jack (really a giant block plane) also has the bevel up, as do the smaller version, which they call a smoothing plane, and their skew-blade block plane. However, good German wooden block planes (E.C.E.) have the bevel down. Probably none of this is gospel, but that's the way the manufacturers make them. Ya pays yer money.... A good source for information on all kinds of planes, shaves, etc. is "The Handplane Book," by Garrett Hack. There are many books on sharpening; a good one is "The Complete Guide to Sharpening," by Leonard Lee.



[This message has been edited by Bayboat (edited 11-10-2000).]

Bayboat
11-10-2000, 04:57 PM
I'm for abolishing the "Tool Police." The general rule is whatever works best for the individual. If you want to hit a caulking iron with a square mallet, why not? (I can hear Dave Fleming gasping for air). As for spokeshaves, Jim, you arrived at the right conclusion. Stanley and Record spokeshaves are bevel down. The American and British wooden ones (yes, Wayne, they are indeed best) with the ears on the blade are bevel up. The Japanese wooden ones, without ears, are bevel down. About block planes: the metal bodied ones (Record, Stanley, Lie-Nielsen) should be sharpened and honed for the bevel up. They work best that way on end or cross grain in hardwoods. The Lie-Nielsen #62 low angle jack (really a giant block plane) also has the bevel up, as do the smaller version, which they call a smoothing plane, and their skew-blade block plane. However, good German wooden block planes (E.C.E.) have the bevel down. Probably none of this is gospel, but that's the way the manufacturers make them. Ya pays yer money.... A good source for information on all kinds of planes, shaves, etc. is "The Handplane Book," by Garrett Hack. There are many books on sharpening; a good one is "The Complete Guide to Sharpening," by Leonard Lee.



[This message has been edited by Bayboat (edited 11-10-2000).]