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Paul Pless
04-14-2014, 08:09 AM
Now thawed. About two thirds of a bucket. . .

It looks pretty dry and crumbly on top. Can I dispose of the inch or so of dry stuff, add a bit of water and mix it up good with a paddle bit and use it?

This never happened in Alabama. . .

slug
04-14-2014, 08:13 AM
Joint compound ?

is that the rolling papers or marijuana ?

rolling papers would be ruined after a freeze , but as far as I know marijuana only needs to be thawed and its ready for action.

give it a go and report back....

bogdog
04-14-2014, 08:21 AM
I would suspect it would be difficult to get a clump free mix even removing the damaged stuff and adding moisture.

Mrleft8
04-14-2014, 08:36 AM
Whaddaya!? A @#$%^&*ing Yankee!?
Throw it out and buy a new bucket.

Jim Ledger
04-14-2014, 08:40 AM
Whaddaya!? A @#$%^&*ing Yankee!?
Throw it out and buy a new bucket.


+1

You're gonna need every advantage...

Paul Pless
04-14-2014, 08:41 AM
I would suspect it would be difficult to get a clump free mix even removing the damaged stuff and adding moisture.

It actually mixed up really smooth. I'm just concerned that its gonna do something weird as it or after it dries. It would totally suck to do this job, add trim, and paint the room; and then a few months or a year later have the seams come undone.


Whaddaya!? A @#$%^&*ing Yankee!?
ouch

Paul Pless
04-14-2014, 08:42 AM
+1

You're gonna need every advantage...

double ouch :D

bogdog
04-14-2014, 08:44 AM
Is this repair or new construction?

oznabrag
04-14-2014, 08:44 AM
You want triple ouch?

Go ahead and use that stuff.

Jim Mahan
04-14-2014, 08:47 AM
I think it all depends on how clean the bucket and the operation to get rid of the crust on the top. If you get any dry particles in there, they'll show up as tracks when you are taping and mudding.

ron ll
04-14-2014, 10:07 AM
Slightly off topic, but I am always amazed at this simple trick that saves my epoxy supply. I have a one gallon can of West epoxy and the smaller can of hardener (5:1) with the measuring pumps. It sits in the shop all winter and altho it never freezes, it usually gets to a point where the pumps don't work right and the ratio gets all whack. So I just float both cans in a bucket of hot tap water for a few hours and it is like brand new. Both the epoxy and hardener are back to normal viscosity and the pumps work and measure correctly like they were brand new.

Prolly the same trick won't work with joint compound tho. :)

ccmanuals
04-14-2014, 10:11 AM
Another neat trick when sealing this type of thing back up is to use cellophane wrap and push it down directly on top of the substance in your container before putting the lid back on.

Breakaway
04-14-2014, 10:15 AM
If its a just a small repair, like a popped nail or you had to change a towel rack to a different style, or added a receptacle somewhere, go ahead and dig deep into the bucket for what you need and use it.

If you are re-doing a room or any major job, go and buy some more.

Kevin

Canoeyawl
04-14-2014, 10:30 AM
"After Ready Mix has been exposed to freeze/thaw conditions, three physical changes are evident:


There is an excessive amount of liquid separation
It becomes very difficult to remix to a smooth, lump-free paste
There are numerous crazing, cracks or fissures in the paste's surface

Note: These conditions vary in severity depending on how many freeze/thaws the product goes through.
Freezing does not affect the quality of the Ready-Mix as long as the container is intact and the material is remixed lump-free. If Ready-Mix is subjected to multiple freeze/thaw cycles, the liquid separation will increase and it will become harder to remix to a smooth, lump-free paste. It is recommended that an electric drill be used for all remixing.
Once Ready-Mix has frozen, allow it to thaw at room temperature for at least 24 hours. When thawed, turn the container upside-down for a minimum of 15 minutes. This will eliminate the need to pour off the separate liquid before remixing. Turn the pail right side up, remove the lid, and immediately remix with an electric drill. Ready-Mix should be lump-free and ready to use within one minute. Discard all Ready-Mix that does not remix to a lump-free consistency".









>Back to Technical Information (http://forum.woodenboat.com/tech-info.htm)

leikec
04-14-2014, 10:49 AM
Damn, man...Kat has a good job. Buy a new bucket of compound. :D

Jeff C

Michael D. Storey
04-14-2014, 01:15 PM
You might be able to burn the dry and crumbly bits.
I've always found wet and frozen joints hard to light.

Swaddled in mirth, art thou?

oznabrag
04-14-2014, 02:49 PM
"After Ready Mix has been exposed to freeze/thaw conditions, three physical changes are evident:


There is an excessive amount of liquid separation
It becomes very difficult to remix to a smooth, lump-free paste
There are numerous crazing, cracks or fissures in the paste's surface

Note: These conditions vary in severity depending on how many freeze/thaws the product goes through.
Freezing does not affect the quality of the Ready-Mix as long as the container is intact and the material is remixed lump-free. If Ready-Mix is subjected to multiple freeze/thaw cycles, the liquid separation will increase and it will become harder to remix to a smooth, lump-free paste. It is recommended that an electric drill be used for all remixing.
Once Ready-Mix has frozen, allow it to thaw at room temperature for at least 24 hours. When thawed, turn the container upside-down for a minimum of 15 minutes. This will eliminate the need to pour off the separate liquid before remixing. Turn the pail right side up, remove the lid, and immediately remix with an electric drill. Ready-Mix should be lump-free and ready to use within one minute. Discard all Ready-Mix that does not remix to a lump-free consistency".









>Back to Technical Information (http://forum.woodenboat.com/tech-info.htm)




I stand corrected.

Thanks!

Paul Pless
04-14-2014, 03:15 PM
Thank you Jake.




"After Ready Mix has been exposed to freeze/thaw conditions, three physical changes are evident:


There is an excessive amount of liquid separation
It becomes very difficult to remix to a smooth, lump-free paste
There are numerous crazing, cracks or fissures in the paste's surface

Note: These conditions vary in severity depending on how many freeze/thaws the product goes through.
Freezing does not affect the quality of the Ready-Mix as long as the container is intact and the material is remixed lump-free. If Ready-Mix is subjected to multiple freeze/thaw cycles, the liquid separation will increase and it will become harder to remix to a smooth, lump-free paste. It is recommended that an electric drill be used for all remixing.
Once Ready-Mix has frozen, allow it to thaw at room temperature for at least 24 hours. When thawed, turn the container upside-down for a minimum of 15 minutes. This will eliminate the need to pour off the separate liquid before remixing. Turn the pail right side up, remove the lid, and immediately remix with an electric drill. Ready-Mix should be lump-free and ready to use within one minute. Discard all Ready-Mix that does not remix to a lump-free consistency".










>Back to Technical Information (http://forum.woodenboat.com/tech-info.htm)


Pretty sure it was just one cycle, it froze in December and just recently thawed.

Canoeyawl
04-14-2014, 04:43 PM
Google fu :d