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jdboat
07-21-2003, 07:40 AM
Looking for the name of the company(s) that produce a clear varnish. Most varnish as you know impart a yellow hue with multiple coats. I read an article a few years back that described several manufactures that included a clear varnish product in there lines. Am working with a blond mahogany area that I wish the color not to darken when I add several varnish refresher coats. Thanks for any help.

jdboat
07-21-2003, 07:40 AM
Looking for the name of the company(s) that produce a clear varnish. Most varnish as you know impart a yellow hue with multiple coats. I read an article a few years back that described several manufactures that included a clear varnish product in there lines. Am working with a blond mahogany area that I wish the color not to darken when I add several varnish refresher coats. Thanks for any help.

jdboat
07-21-2003, 07:40 AM
Looking for the name of the company(s) that produce a clear varnish. Most varnish as you know impart a yellow hue with multiple coats. I read an article a few years back that described several manufactures that included a clear varnish product in there lines. Am working with a blond mahogany area that I wish the color not to darken when I add several varnish refresher coats. Thanks for any help.

Mrleft8
07-21-2003, 07:52 AM
You could look for "DeMar" varnish at an artists suply place. It's super high quality, clear varnish used for top coating oil paintings. It's ungoddly expensive, but for a small area.... I don't know how durable it would be for exterior use, but I would assume it's fairly flexible, seeing as how it's used on canvas...

Mrleft8
07-21-2003, 07:52 AM
You could look for "DeMar" varnish at an artists suply place. It's super high quality, clear varnish used for top coating oil paintings. It's ungoddly expensive, but for a small area.... I don't know how durable it would be for exterior use, but I would assume it's fairly flexible, seeing as how it's used on canvas...

Mrleft8
07-21-2003, 07:52 AM
You could look for "DeMar" varnish at an artists suply place. It's super high quality, clear varnish used for top coating oil paintings. It's ungoddly expensive, but for a small area.... I don't know how durable it would be for exterior use, but I would assume it's fairly flexible, seeing as how it's used on canvas...

whb
07-21-2003, 03:07 PM
A latex polyurethane (not a real varnish I know) will often give a very nice clear finish.

Howard

whb
07-21-2003, 03:07 PM
A latex polyurethane (not a real varnish I know) will often give a very nice clear finish.

Howard

whb
07-21-2003, 03:07 PM
A latex polyurethane (not a real varnish I know) will often give a very nice clear finish.

Howard

Fishboat
07-21-2003, 08:14 PM
Look for a 100% acrylic base varnish. Acrylics are water-white & clear (look basically like water with no yellow hue) by nature. Check the exterior durability claims....acrylics are very good in exterior applications as long as that was the intent when the varnish was formulated.

Fishboat
07-21-2003, 08:14 PM
Look for a 100% acrylic base varnish. Acrylics are water-white & clear (look basically like water with no yellow hue) by nature. Check the exterior durability claims....acrylics are very good in exterior applications as long as that was the intent when the varnish was formulated.

Fishboat
07-21-2003, 08:14 PM
Look for a 100% acrylic base varnish. Acrylics are water-white & clear (look basically like water with no yellow hue) by nature. Check the exterior durability claims....acrylics are very good in exterior applications as long as that was the intent when the varnish was formulated.

Wild Wassa
07-21-2003, 09:13 PM
Mrleft8, Damar is used to accelerate drying, and is used in/as a glazing medium and when it is used, only a drop is placed in the mix.

Damar is only used as a varnish when an oil painting has been curing for about 6 months (the minimum curing time before applying Damar). The underlying coats need to be close to polimerization before applying. Damar also yellows with age.

Damar dries to a clear finish. I would not use it on a boat, without further investigation, I don't know how it handles water. It is thinner than CPES. The purpose of Damar is to standardize the gloss levels of an oil painting, and needs to be applied very thinly, or to aid drying as earlier mentioned.

Damar comes in crystals, which are dissolved in a gum turpentine or in a liquid form (which is expensive).

Warren.

[ 07-22-2003, 01:00 AM: Message edited by: Wild Wassa ]

Wild Wassa
07-21-2003, 09:13 PM
Mrleft8, Damar is used to accelerate drying, and is used in/as a glazing medium and when it is used, only a drop is placed in the mix.

Damar is only used as a varnish when an oil painting has been curing for about 6 months (the minimum curing time before applying Damar). The underlying coats need to be close to polimerization before applying. Damar also yellows with age.

Damar dries to a clear finish. I would not use it on a boat, without further investigation, I don't know how it handles water. It is thinner than CPES. The purpose of Damar is to standardize the gloss levels of an oil painting, and needs to be applied very thinly, or to aid drying as earlier mentioned.

Damar comes in crystals, which are dissolved in a gum turpentine or in a liquid form (which is expensive).

Warren.

[ 07-22-2003, 01:00 AM: Message edited by: Wild Wassa ]

Wild Wassa
07-21-2003, 09:13 PM
Mrleft8, Damar is used to accelerate drying, and is used in/as a glazing medium and when it is used, only a drop is placed in the mix.

Damar is only used as a varnish when an oil painting has been curing for about 6 months (the minimum curing time before applying Damar). The underlying coats need to be close to polimerization before applying. Damar also yellows with age.

Damar dries to a clear finish. I would not use it on a boat, without further investigation, I don't know how it handles water. It is thinner than CPES. The purpose of Damar is to standardize the gloss levels of an oil painting, and needs to be applied very thinly, or to aid drying as earlier mentioned.

Damar comes in crystals, which are dissolved in a gum turpentine or in a liquid form (which is expensive).

Warren.

[ 07-22-2003, 01:00 AM: Message edited by: Wild Wassa ]

Mrleft8
07-21-2003, 09:42 PM
Thank you Warren.... I was getting worried, It's quarter to eleven at night, and I hadn't learned anything new today. You saved my life, very likely! ;)

Mrleft8
07-21-2003, 09:42 PM
Thank you Warren.... I was getting worried, It's quarter to eleven at night, and I hadn't learned anything new today. You saved my life, very likely! ;)

Mrleft8
07-21-2003, 09:42 PM
Thank you Warren.... I was getting worried, It's quarter to eleven at night, and I hadn't learned anything new today. You saved my life, very likely! ;)

Wild Wassa
07-21-2003, 11:14 PM
Mrleft8, it was the boat I was trying to save originally, but saving you was truely a collateral bonus, Sir.

Warren.

ps, I could be beyond saving.

Wild Wassa
07-21-2003, 11:14 PM
Mrleft8, it was the boat I was trying to save originally, but saving you was truely a collateral bonus, Sir.

Warren.

ps, I could be beyond saving.

Wild Wassa
07-21-2003, 11:14 PM
Mrleft8, it was the boat I was trying to save originally, but saving you was truely a collateral bonus, Sir.

Warren.

ps, I could be beyond saving.

JimD
07-22-2003, 01:08 AM
This might be a good time for Chemist to grace us with his presence, but I don't think any true varnishes are clear. The really clear topcoats are more modern chemical concoctions, polyurethane based. There are newer refined varnishes such as Behrs Super Varnish that are nearly clear and claim to provide 45 factor sunblock protection. It smells and cures like real varnish so I suppose it is. I am currently using Sikkens Cetol coatings. The tinted product that provides most of the UV protection goes on a very attractive near transparent golden honey brown, and can be final coated with Cetol clear gloss topcoat. The warning label says it contains solvents known to cause permanent brain damage so use with respirator or very well ventilated space or become the next mad hatter.

JimD
07-22-2003, 01:08 AM
This might be a good time for Chemist to grace us with his presence, but I don't think any true varnishes are clear. The really clear topcoats are more modern chemical concoctions, polyurethane based. There are newer refined varnishes such as Behrs Super Varnish that are nearly clear and claim to provide 45 factor sunblock protection. It smells and cures like real varnish so I suppose it is. I am currently using Sikkens Cetol coatings. The tinted product that provides most of the UV protection goes on a very attractive near transparent golden honey brown, and can be final coated with Cetol clear gloss topcoat. The warning label says it contains solvents known to cause permanent brain damage so use with respirator or very well ventilated space or become the next mad hatter.

JimD
07-22-2003, 01:08 AM
This might be a good time for Chemist to grace us with his presence, but I don't think any true varnishes are clear. The really clear topcoats are more modern chemical concoctions, polyurethane based. There are newer refined varnishes such as Behrs Super Varnish that are nearly clear and claim to provide 45 factor sunblock protection. It smells and cures like real varnish so I suppose it is. I am currently using Sikkens Cetol coatings. The tinted product that provides most of the UV protection goes on a very attractive near transparent golden honey brown, and can be final coated with Cetol clear gloss topcoat. The warning label says it contains solvents known to cause permanent brain damage so use with respirator or very well ventilated space or become the next mad hatter.