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Jeff Kelety
11-21-2000, 01:57 AM
The question of where to find a basic cedar wooden bucket came up recently. The only response was Lehman's and Cumberland General Store. The former only carries leaky oak buckets as far as I can tell from their on-line catalog and I couldn't find the latter on the web. Anyone know of a "for real" source for the proverbial (and sealed!) wooden bucket?

Jeff Kelety
11-21-2000, 01:57 AM
The question of where to find a basic cedar wooden bucket came up recently. The only response was Lehman's and Cumberland General Store. The former only carries leaky oak buckets as far as I can tell from their on-line catalog and I couldn't find the latter on the web. Anyone know of a "for real" source for the proverbial (and sealed!) wooden bucket?

Jeff Kelety
11-21-2000, 01:57 AM
The question of where to find a basic cedar wooden bucket came up recently. The only response was Lehman's and Cumberland General Store. The former only carries leaky oak buckets as far as I can tell from their on-line catalog and I couldn't find the latter on the web. Anyone know of a "for real" source for the proverbial (and sealed!) wooden bucket?

David Hill
11-21-2000, 09:49 AM
Tony Correa dba AGA Correa (1-800-341-0788), Wiscasset, Maine, used to sell very nice white northern cedar buckets made by Sam Francis at Back River Boat Yard (207-371-2272), Georgetown, Maine. You might start there.

David Hill
11-21-2000, 09:49 AM
Tony Correa dba AGA Correa (1-800-341-0788), Wiscasset, Maine, used to sell very nice white northern cedar buckets made by Sam Francis at Back River Boat Yard (207-371-2272), Georgetown, Maine. You might start there.

David Hill
11-21-2000, 09:49 AM
Tony Correa dba AGA Correa (1-800-341-0788), Wiscasset, Maine, used to sell very nice white northern cedar buckets made by Sam Francis at Back River Boat Yard (207-371-2272), Georgetown, Maine. You might start there.

Jeff Kelety
11-21-2000, 10:13 AM
Thanks, David. I'll follow up on this.

Jeff Kelety
11-21-2000, 10:13 AM
Thanks, David. I'll follow up on this.

Jeff Kelety
11-21-2000, 10:13 AM
Thanks, David. I'll follow up on this.

Jeff Kelety
11-21-2000, 12:11 PM
Just called. Their wooden bucket is off the market. Man, this is as hard to find as, as a wooden bucket. Get out the strips of cedar!

Jeff Kelety
11-21-2000, 12:11 PM
Just called. Their wooden bucket is off the market. Man, this is as hard to find as, as a wooden bucket. Get out the strips of cedar!

Jeff Kelety
11-21-2000, 12:11 PM
Just called. Their wooden bucket is off the market. Man, this is as hard to find as, as a wooden bucket. Get out the strips of cedar!

NormMessinger
11-21-2000, 01:12 PM
Colonial Williamsberg?

--Norm

NormMessinger
11-21-2000, 01:12 PM
Colonial Williamsberg?

--Norm

NormMessinger
11-21-2000, 01:12 PM
Colonial Williamsberg?

--Norm

McMichael
11-21-2000, 01:16 PM
You might try Pleasant Hill Shaker Village in Kentucky. Resident cooper still makes 'em. I believe they do sell. If not, they should be able to point you towards a source.

McMichael
11-21-2000, 01:16 PM
You might try Pleasant Hill Shaker Village in Kentucky. Resident cooper still makes 'em. I believe they do sell. If not, they should be able to point you towards a source.

McMichael
11-21-2000, 01:16 PM
You might try Pleasant Hill Shaker Village in Kentucky. Resident cooper still makes 'em. I believe they do sell. If not, they should be able to point you towards a source.

JAGJR
11-21-2000, 01:18 PM
Try Beaver Bucket - http://www.beaverbuckets.com/cedar.html

another outfit worth a try is Spaulding and Frost at http://www.spauldingandfrost.com

JAGJR
11-21-2000, 01:18 PM
Try Beaver Bucket - http://www.beaverbuckets.com/cedar.html

another outfit worth a try is Spaulding and Frost at http://www.spauldingandfrost.com

JAGJR
11-21-2000, 01:18 PM
Try Beaver Bucket - http://www.beaverbuckets.com/cedar.html

another outfit worth a try is Spaulding and Frost at http://www.spauldingandfrost.com

Jamie Hascall
11-21-2000, 01:23 PM
Jeff,

This sounds like the perfect place to work out some elementary coopering skills. It shouldn't be too bad since the staves don't have any curvature and you could always bed everything with a little modern gooey stuff if you don't feel comfortable about the possibility of leakage . I'll see if I can think of any other sources for info or buckets, but I think I'd check at the library for the Foxfire books or old issues of Mother earth news. (There must be somebody in Port Townsend who has the entire series of each.) With the great work you've done on Nais, I've no doubt you can solve this little problem.

Good Luck

Jamie

Jamie Hascall
11-21-2000, 01:23 PM
Jeff,

This sounds like the perfect place to work out some elementary coopering skills. It shouldn't be too bad since the staves don't have any curvature and you could always bed everything with a little modern gooey stuff if you don't feel comfortable about the possibility of leakage . I'll see if I can think of any other sources for info or buckets, but I think I'd check at the library for the Foxfire books or old issues of Mother earth news. (There must be somebody in Port Townsend who has the entire series of each.) With the great work you've done on Nais, I've no doubt you can solve this little problem.

Good Luck

Jamie

Jamie Hascall
11-21-2000, 01:23 PM
Jeff,

This sounds like the perfect place to work out some elementary coopering skills. It shouldn't be too bad since the staves don't have any curvature and you could always bed everything with a little modern gooey stuff if you don't feel comfortable about the possibility of leakage . I'll see if I can think of any other sources for info or buckets, but I think I'd check at the library for the Foxfire books or old issues of Mother earth news. (There must be somebody in Port Townsend who has the entire series of each.) With the great work you've done on Nais, I've no doubt you can solve this little problem.

Good Luck

Jamie

Jeff Kelety
11-21-2000, 01:33 PM
<With the great work you've done on Nais, I've no doubt you can solve this little problem.>

Thanks for the vote of confidence, Jamie. I was just hoping to "buy" my way out of this little problem, leaving more time for the "big" problems like the acres of scraping, sanding and varnishing I'm doing in the cockpit <g>.

Jeff Kelety
11-21-2000, 01:33 PM
<With the great work you've done on Nais, I've no doubt you can solve this little problem.>

Thanks for the vote of confidence, Jamie. I was just hoping to "buy" my way out of this little problem, leaving more time for the "big" problems like the acres of scraping, sanding and varnishing I'm doing in the cockpit <g>.

Jeff Kelety
11-21-2000, 01:33 PM
<With the great work you've done on Nais, I've no doubt you can solve this little problem.>

Thanks for the vote of confidence, Jamie. I was just hoping to "buy" my way out of this little problem, leaving more time for the "big" problems like the acres of scraping, sanding and varnishing I'm doing in the cockpit <g>.

Scott Mason
11-21-2000, 02:45 PM
How about sauna suppliers? Try this
http://www.saunas.com/accessories.htm

Scott Mason
11-21-2000, 02:45 PM
How about sauna suppliers? Try this
http://www.saunas.com/accessories.htm

Scott Mason
11-21-2000, 02:45 PM
How about sauna suppliers? Try this
http://www.saunas.com/accessories.htm

NormMessinger
11-21-2000, 04:47 PM
What do you want the bucket for? I understand it is okay to pee overboard but if you put it in a buckut you have to take it home with you.

--Norm

NormMessinger
11-21-2000, 04:47 PM
What do you want the bucket for? I understand it is okay to pee overboard but if you put it in a buckut you have to take it home with you.

--Norm

NormMessinger
11-21-2000, 04:47 PM
What do you want the bucket for? I understand it is okay to pee overboard but if you put it in a buckut you have to take it home with you.

--Norm

Jeff Kelety
11-21-2000, 06:25 PM
<I understand it is okay to pee overboard but if you put it in a buckut you have to take it home with you.>

Now that's getting down to the heart of the matter, Norm! Maybe we could get you down to Florida to help sort out that hanging chad problem as well <g>.

Yup. We have to cart it home here in the Puget Sound as well, least ways, my wife makes me. But there's no good room for one of those 'Port-a-pot' plastic square things on a little Folkboat. So a proper cedar bucket seems appropriate. Lots of plactic liner bags to go with it, though.

Jeff

Jeff Kelety
11-21-2000, 06:25 PM
<I understand it is okay to pee overboard but if you put it in a buckut you have to take it home with you.>

Now that's getting down to the heart of the matter, Norm! Maybe we could get you down to Florida to help sort out that hanging chad problem as well <g>.

Yup. We have to cart it home here in the Puget Sound as well, least ways, my wife makes me. But there's no good room for one of those 'Port-a-pot' plastic square things on a little Folkboat. So a proper cedar bucket seems appropriate. Lots of plactic liner bags to go with it, though.

Jeff

Jeff Kelety
11-21-2000, 06:25 PM
<I understand it is okay to pee overboard but if you put it in a buckut you have to take it home with you.>

Now that's getting down to the heart of the matter, Norm! Maybe we could get you down to Florida to help sort out that hanging chad problem as well <g>.

Yup. We have to cart it home here in the Puget Sound as well, least ways, my wife makes me. But there's no good room for one of those 'Port-a-pot' plastic square things on a little Folkboat. So a proper cedar bucket seems appropriate. Lots of plactic liner bags to go with it, though.

Jeff

ishmael
11-21-2000, 10:24 PM
Dare I call you a fibber? Never know when the poop police are listening in, so I don't blame ya. Where does all that whale poop go these days? Big diapers, I've heard.

ishmael
11-21-2000, 10:24 PM
Dare I call you a fibber? Never know when the poop police are listening in, so I don't blame ya. Where does all that whale poop go these days? Big diapers, I've heard.

ishmael
11-21-2000, 10:24 PM
Dare I call you a fibber? Never know when the poop police are listening in, so I don't blame ya. Where does all that whale poop go these days? Big diapers, I've heard.

Bob Cleek
11-24-2000, 05:12 PM
Please DON'T line your bucket with a plastic bag! The plastiic doesn't decompose in the environment when you throw it overboard. Just empty the bucket over the side. Be sure to throw the bucket FORWARD if you're moving at the time, and then recover it before it is abreast of you. Depending on the speed and weight of the vessel, it is unlikely you will be able to hold onto it once it is towing astern. Lots of buckets (and a few crew) have been lost due to overlooking this simple fact. BTW, I'd opt for a plain old plastic bucket myself. LFH's ode to the wooden bucket aside, a 5 gallon mud bucket is a lot easier to rinse out than a cedar bucket. A well used cedar bucket tends to absorb the character of its contents, if you know what I mean.

Bob Cleek
11-24-2000, 05:12 PM
Please DON'T line your bucket with a plastic bag! The plastiic doesn't decompose in the environment when you throw it overboard. Just empty the bucket over the side. Be sure to throw the bucket FORWARD if you're moving at the time, and then recover it before it is abreast of you. Depending on the speed and weight of the vessel, it is unlikely you will be able to hold onto it once it is towing astern. Lots of buckets (and a few crew) have been lost due to overlooking this simple fact. BTW, I'd opt for a plain old plastic bucket myself. LFH's ode to the wooden bucket aside, a 5 gallon mud bucket is a lot easier to rinse out than a cedar bucket. A well used cedar bucket tends to absorb the character of its contents, if you know what I mean.

Bob Cleek
11-24-2000, 05:12 PM
Please DON'T line your bucket with a plastic bag! The plastiic doesn't decompose in the environment when you throw it overboard. Just empty the bucket over the side. Be sure to throw the bucket FORWARD if you're moving at the time, and then recover it before it is abreast of you. Depending on the speed and weight of the vessel, it is unlikely you will be able to hold onto it once it is towing astern. Lots of buckets (and a few crew) have been lost due to overlooking this simple fact. BTW, I'd opt for a plain old plastic bucket myself. LFH's ode to the wooden bucket aside, a 5 gallon mud bucket is a lot easier to rinse out than a cedar bucket. A well used cedar bucket tends to absorb the character of its contents, if you know what I mean.

Ian Wright
11-24-2000, 06:40 PM
Farmers supply shops AKA feed stores sell great tough black rubber buckets with moulded lugs around which you can splice a good rope handle. No dings or scratches in your painted topsides and no splinters in your arse,,,,,,,

IanW.

[This message has been edited by Ian Wright (edited 11-25-2000).]

Ian Wright
11-24-2000, 06:40 PM
Farmers supply shops AKA feed stores sell great tough black rubber buckets with moulded lugs around which you can splice a good rope handle. No dings or scratches in your painted topsides and no splinters in your arse,,,,,,,

IanW.

[This message has been edited by Ian Wright (edited 11-25-2000).]

Ian Wright
11-24-2000, 06:40 PM
Farmers supply shops AKA feed stores sell great tough black rubber buckets with moulded lugs around which you can splice a good rope handle. No dings or scratches in your painted topsides and no splinters in your arse,,,,,,,

IanW.

[This message has been edited by Ian Wright (edited 11-25-2000).]

Jeff Kelety
11-24-2000, 07:03 PM
<Please DON'T line your bucket with a plastic bag! The plastiic doesn't decompose in the environment when you throw it overboard. >

Aw, Bob, when I said cart it home (or to the nearest dumping station), I meant it <g>. No plastic bags ever leave the Nais for the sea or land. When you get home, you have to empty the bags into the waste station. Then rinse the bags and they get recycled.

And Ian's probably right - as my dear wife also insists - "Your going to use a wooden bucket for that?!"

Jeff

Jeff Kelety
11-24-2000, 07:03 PM
<Please DON'T line your bucket with a plastic bag! The plastiic doesn't decompose in the environment when you throw it overboard. >

Aw, Bob, when I said cart it home (or to the nearest dumping station), I meant it <g>. No plastic bags ever leave the Nais for the sea or land. When you get home, you have to empty the bags into the waste station. Then rinse the bags and they get recycled.

And Ian's probably right - as my dear wife also insists - "Your going to use a wooden bucket for that?!"

Jeff

Jeff Kelety
11-24-2000, 07:03 PM
<Please DON'T line your bucket with a plastic bag! The plastiic doesn't decompose in the environment when you throw it overboard. >

Aw, Bob, when I said cart it home (or to the nearest dumping station), I meant it <g>. No plastic bags ever leave the Nais for the sea or land. When you get home, you have to empty the bags into the waste station. Then rinse the bags and they get recycled.

And Ian's probably right - as my dear wife also insists - "Your going to use a wooden bucket for that?!"

Jeff

NormMessinger
11-25-2000, 09:32 AM
By jove! Ya all have given me an inspiration. I still have the old enamal chamber pot I grew up with (on) in Western Kansas, low those many many years ago. The last thing mom did on wash day (always Monday) was to use the rinse water to wash to pots. That went on until after I went off to coledge.

Now if I can just find a stove for Prairie Islander that burns corn cobs, maybe I'll go out as I came in.

--Norm

[This message has been edited by NormMessinger (edited 11-25-2000).]

NormMessinger
11-25-2000, 09:32 AM
By jove! Ya all have given me an inspiration. I still have the old enamal chamber pot I grew up with (on) in Western Kansas, low those many many years ago. The last thing mom did on wash day (always Monday) was to use the rinse water to wash to pots. That went on until after I went off to coledge.

Now if I can just find a stove for Prairie Islander that burns corn cobs, maybe I'll go out as I came in.

--Norm

[This message has been edited by NormMessinger (edited 11-25-2000).]

NormMessinger
11-25-2000, 09:32 AM
By jove! Ya all have given me an inspiration. I still have the old enamal chamber pot I grew up with (on) in Western Kansas, low those many many years ago. The last thing mom did on wash day (always Monday) was to use the rinse water to wash to pots. That went on until after I went off to coledge.

Now if I can just find a stove for Prairie Islander that burns corn cobs, maybe I'll go out as I came in.

--Norm

[This message has been edited by NormMessinger (edited 11-25-2000).]

thechemist
11-25-2000, 04:44 PM
Ya know, in the antique car and vehicle accessory catalogs [I think I saw it in a J. C. Whitney catalog once...] there is a thing called a Motorman's Tube. Back in the good ol' days when it was inconvenient for the motorman to get off the trolley to go find a place to take a leak, there was this gadget on his left....basically a funnel and a long piece of tubing...long enough to reach down below the trolley floorboards, almost to the street, if you get my drift...

In those days the trolleys shared the street with horses, and no one noticed....

I recently saw somewhere on the web a modern version with the funnel molded to a distinctly oval shape, designed for women.

Seems to me that you'd only need that cedar bucket for number two......so the foregoing doesn't eliminate the problem entirely.

thechemist
11-25-2000, 04:44 PM
Ya know, in the antique car and vehicle accessory catalogs [I think I saw it in a J. C. Whitney catalog once...] there is a thing called a Motorman's Tube. Back in the good ol' days when it was inconvenient for the motorman to get off the trolley to go find a place to take a leak, there was this gadget on his left....basically a funnel and a long piece of tubing...long enough to reach down below the trolley floorboards, almost to the street, if you get my drift...

In those days the trolleys shared the street with horses, and no one noticed....

I recently saw somewhere on the web a modern version with the funnel molded to a distinctly oval shape, designed for women.

Seems to me that you'd only need that cedar bucket for number two......so the foregoing doesn't eliminate the problem entirely.

thechemist
11-25-2000, 04:44 PM
Ya know, in the antique car and vehicle accessory catalogs [I think I saw it in a J. C. Whitney catalog once...] there is a thing called a Motorman's Tube. Back in the good ol' days when it was inconvenient for the motorman to get off the trolley to go find a place to take a leak, there was this gadget on his left....basically a funnel and a long piece of tubing...long enough to reach down below the trolley floorboards, almost to the street, if you get my drift...

In those days the trolleys shared the street with horses, and no one noticed....

I recently saw somewhere on the web a modern version with the funnel molded to a distinctly oval shape, designed for women.

Seems to me that you'd only need that cedar bucket for number two......so the foregoing doesn't eliminate the problem entirely.

Jeff Kelety
11-27-2000, 01:37 AM
Hmmm. An antique chamber pot. Now there's a thought.

BTW, speaking of enamel, I've been trying to find white enamel plates with blue or black trim to match the cups I have. Seems the manufacturer makes the cups but not the plates. Go figure. Anyone got five or more plates of this old white camping gear style and wanna part with it, give a holler.

Jeff

Jeff Kelety
11-27-2000, 01:37 AM
Hmmm. An antique chamber pot. Now there's a thought.

BTW, speaking of enamel, I've been trying to find white enamel plates with blue or black trim to match the cups I have. Seems the manufacturer makes the cups but not the plates. Go figure. Anyone got five or more plates of this old white camping gear style and wanna part with it, give a holler.

Jeff

Jeff Kelety
11-27-2000, 01:37 AM
Hmmm. An antique chamber pot. Now there's a thought.

BTW, speaking of enamel, I've been trying to find white enamel plates with blue or black trim to match the cups I have. Seems the manufacturer makes the cups but not the plates. Go figure. Anyone got five or more plates of this old white camping gear style and wanna part with it, give a holler.

Jeff

NormMessinger
11-27-2000, 09:42 AM
Funniest story I ever heard came from an old Long EZ pilot. Seems the relief tube many ouf us have on our birds extended into the cold slip stream so the first few drops to hit it on this particular flight froze in the tube and cloged it up. Funnel filled, one handed landing, extracation from the airplane, march throught the crowded FBO, etc. Well, maybe you have to fly one to appreciate the prediciment and humor of it all.

Those funny shaped funnels are sold in most pilot supply catalogues.

--Norm

NormMessinger
11-27-2000, 09:42 AM
Funniest story I ever heard came from an old Long EZ pilot. Seems the relief tube many ouf us have on our birds extended into the cold slip stream so the first few drops to hit it on this particular flight froze in the tube and cloged it up. Funnel filled, one handed landing, extracation from the airplane, march throught the crowded FBO, etc. Well, maybe you have to fly one to appreciate the prediciment and humor of it all.

Those funny shaped funnels are sold in most pilot supply catalogues.

--Norm

NormMessinger
11-27-2000, 09:42 AM
Funniest story I ever heard came from an old Long EZ pilot. Seems the relief tube many ouf us have on our birds extended into the cold slip stream so the first few drops to hit it on this particular flight froze in the tube and cloged it up. Funnel filled, one handed landing, extracation from the airplane, march throught the crowded FBO, etc. Well, maybe you have to fly one to appreciate the prediciment and humor of it all.

Those funny shaped funnels are sold in most pilot supply catalogues.

--Norm

Jeff Kelety
11-27-2000, 10:26 AM
<Well, maybe you have to fly one to appreciate the prediciment and humor of it all.>

Naw, I appreciate it. That's why I only did a few hours towards a certificate. Noisy, singular things, full-scale airplanes. Did a lot of RC, though. All electric - no noise like sailboats.

jgk

Jeff Kelety
11-27-2000, 10:26 AM
<Well, maybe you have to fly one to appreciate the prediciment and humor of it all.>

Naw, I appreciate it. That's why I only did a few hours towards a certificate. Noisy, singular things, full-scale airplanes. Did a lot of RC, though. All electric - no noise like sailboats.

jgk

Jeff Kelety
11-27-2000, 10:26 AM
<Well, maybe you have to fly one to appreciate the prediciment and humor of it all.>

Naw, I appreciate it. That's why I only did a few hours towards a certificate. Noisy, singular things, full-scale airplanes. Did a lot of RC, though. All electric - no noise like sailboats.

jgk

John Gearing
11-27-2000, 11:09 AM
I always thought it would be nice to have a pinky schooner due to that long false stern that sweeps out beyond the rudder. Seemed like a good spot from which to securely "go" while "watching her go"......

John Gearing
11-27-2000, 11:09 AM
I always thought it would be nice to have a pinky schooner due to that long false stern that sweeps out beyond the rudder. Seemed like a good spot from which to securely "go" while "watching her go"......

John Gearing
11-27-2000, 11:09 AM
I always thought it would be nice to have a pinky schooner due to that long false stern that sweeps out beyond the rudder. Seemed like a good spot from which to securely "go" while "watching her go"......

Gary Bergman
12-03-2000, 09:51 PM
About the plates. Have you looked at the enameled plates at 'Old Navy'? Reasonable, and replaceable

Gary Bergman
12-03-2000, 09:51 PM
About the plates. Have you looked at the enameled plates at 'Old Navy'? Reasonable, and replaceable

Gary Bergman
12-03-2000, 09:51 PM
About the plates. Have you looked at the enameled plates at 'Old Navy'? Reasonable, and replaceable

Jeff Kelety
12-04-2000, 11:34 PM
<About the plates. Have you looked at the enameled plates at 'Old Navy'? Reasonable, and replaceable>

Just looked at the Old Navy web site and saw clothes (!?). Wrong Old Navy, Gary? Do you have a specific URL pointing to plates?

I did find some at an antique store and some friends found them at camping supply stores in England. Ain't it great what friends will do to help keep the old salty ways alive?

Jeff Kelety
12-04-2000, 11:34 PM
<About the plates. Have you looked at the enameled plates at 'Old Navy'? Reasonable, and replaceable>

Just looked at the Old Navy web site and saw clothes (!?). Wrong Old Navy, Gary? Do you have a specific URL pointing to plates?

I did find some at an antique store and some friends found them at camping supply stores in England. Ain't it great what friends will do to help keep the old salty ways alive?

Jeff Kelety
12-04-2000, 11:34 PM
<About the plates. Have you looked at the enameled plates at 'Old Navy'? Reasonable, and replaceable>

Just looked at the Old Navy web site and saw clothes (!?). Wrong Old Navy, Gary? Do you have a specific URL pointing to plates?

I did find some at an antique store and some friends found them at camping supply stores in England. Ain't it great what friends will do to help keep the old salty ways alive?

John058
12-05-2000, 06:36 AM
This told to me by an antique dealer. Seems the wealthier folks had enormous covered china chamber pots and were much in demand by well-heeled patrons. Numerous cases of severe illness, after various dinner parties, caused some of them to find out they weren't really soup tureens. Might have been better to do the research beforehand. http://media4.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/smile.gif http://media4.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/smile.gif

John058
12-05-2000, 06:36 AM
This told to me by an antique dealer. Seems the wealthier folks had enormous covered china chamber pots and were much in demand by well-heeled patrons. Numerous cases of severe illness, after various dinner parties, caused some of them to find out they weren't really soup tureens. Might have been better to do the research beforehand. http://media4.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/smile.gif http://media4.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/smile.gif

John058
12-05-2000, 06:36 AM
This told to me by an antique dealer. Seems the wealthier folks had enormous covered china chamber pots and were much in demand by well-heeled patrons. Numerous cases of severe illness, after various dinner parties, caused some of them to find out they weren't really soup tureens. Might have been better to do the research beforehand. http://media4.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/smile.gif http://media4.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/smile.gif

Jeff Kelety
12-05-2000, 08:58 PM
<If it's possible to use one of these on a 12 inch wide ledge a couple of thousand feet of the ground while a clipped to a piton, it shouldn't be a problem on a boat.>

Indeed it shouldn't. What an elegant solution for a compact holding tank! I'll mull this one over, Tony.

Thanks,
Jeff

Jeff Kelety
12-05-2000, 08:58 PM
<If it's possible to use one of these on a 12 inch wide ledge a couple of thousand feet of the ground while a clipped to a piton, it shouldn't be a problem on a boat.>

Indeed it shouldn't. What an elegant solution for a compact holding tank! I'll mull this one over, Tony.

Thanks,
Jeff

Jeff Kelety
12-05-2000, 08:58 PM
<If it's possible to use one of these on a 12 inch wide ledge a couple of thousand feet of the ground while a clipped to a piton, it shouldn't be a problem on a boat.>

Indeed it shouldn't. What an elegant solution for a compact holding tank! I'll mull this one over, Tony.

Thanks,
Jeff

Ron Williamson
12-05-2000, 10:01 PM
The plastic pipe sounds way better than using a paper grocery bag and chucking over the edge,like climbers did in the not-so-good old days.

Ron Williamson
12-05-2000, 10:01 PM
The plastic pipe sounds way better than using a paper grocery bag and chucking over the edge,like climbers did in the not-so-good old days.

Ron Williamson
12-05-2000, 10:01 PM
The plastic pipe sounds way better than using a paper grocery bag and chucking over the edge,like climbers did in the not-so-good old days.

ishmael
12-06-2000, 06:36 PM
Just so I'm clear, a six inch pipe? I'm seeing some 'interesting' acrobatics aboard a folkboat at sea.

ishmael
12-06-2000, 06:36 PM
Just so I'm clear, a six inch pipe? I'm seeing some 'interesting' acrobatics aboard a folkboat at sea.

ishmael
12-06-2000, 06:36 PM
Just so I'm clear, a six inch pipe? I'm seeing some 'interesting' acrobatics aboard a folkboat at sea.

thechemist
12-06-2000, 09:07 PM
Pipe comes in bigger sizes if ya need it......

thechemist
12-06-2000, 09:07 PM
Pipe comes in bigger sizes if ya need it......

thechemist
12-06-2000, 09:07 PM
Pipe comes in bigger sizes if ya need it......

Jeff Kelety
12-07-2000, 02:34 AM
Well, this started with the notion of a wooden bucket, perhaps I can end it so.

Combining Tony's suggestion, it may be possible to loosely secure (for subsequent removal and stoage in the bilge) said pipe IN said tasteful wooden bucket with accompanying bottom-friendly toilet seat ala LFH. Perhaps a plastic funnel secured to the seat to direct the "flow" as it were into the pipe and voila, no more flimsy (and precarious) plastic bags and no highly untastful port-a-thing which wouldn't fit in a Folkie anyhow.

Such are my musings to this point. Sort of amazing we're still talking about things this, ah, organic <g>, but I must say, it is useful.

Jeff

[This message has been edited by Jeff Kelety (edited 12-07-2000).]

Jeff Kelety
12-07-2000, 02:34 AM
Well, this started with the notion of a wooden bucket, perhaps I can end it so.

Combining Tony's suggestion, it may be possible to loosely secure (for subsequent removal and stoage in the bilge) said pipe IN said tasteful wooden bucket with accompanying bottom-friendly toilet seat ala LFH. Perhaps a plastic funnel secured to the seat to direct the "flow" as it were into the pipe and voila, no more flimsy (and precarious) plastic bags and no highly untastful port-a-thing which wouldn't fit in a Folkie anyhow.

Such are my musings to this point. Sort of amazing we're still talking about things this, ah, organic <g>, but I must say, it is useful.

Jeff

[This message has been edited by Jeff Kelety (edited 12-07-2000).]

Jeff Kelety
12-07-2000, 02:34 AM
Well, this started with the notion of a wooden bucket, perhaps I can end it so.

Combining Tony's suggestion, it may be possible to loosely secure (for subsequent removal and stoage in the bilge) said pipe IN said tasteful wooden bucket with accompanying bottom-friendly toilet seat ala LFH. Perhaps a plastic funnel secured to the seat to direct the "flow" as it were into the pipe and voila, no more flimsy (and precarious) plastic bags and no highly untastful port-a-thing which wouldn't fit in a Folkie anyhow.

Such are my musings to this point. Sort of amazing we're still talking about things this, ah, organic <g>, but I must say, it is useful.

Jeff

[This message has been edited by Jeff Kelety (edited 12-07-2000).]

Kermit
12-07-2000, 11:02 PM
The Duluth Trading Company--or whatever, the folks who bring you parachute bags, the bucket boss, the gatemouth, etc.--make a lid for plastic buckets that turns it into a seat while covering the, uh, contents. Someone else try it and make a full report. I'll wait here for you...

Kermit
12-07-2000, 11:02 PM
The Duluth Trading Company--or whatever, the folks who bring you parachute bags, the bucket boss, the gatemouth, etc.--make a lid for plastic buckets that turns it into a seat while covering the, uh, contents. Someone else try it and make a full report. I'll wait here for you...

Kermit
12-07-2000, 11:02 PM
The Duluth Trading Company--or whatever, the folks who bring you parachute bags, the bucket boss, the gatemouth, etc.--make a lid for plastic buckets that turns it into a seat while covering the, uh, contents. Someone else try it and make a full report. I'll wait here for you...

Henri
12-09-2000, 11:00 AM
A matching pair of 5 gal plastic paint/sheet rock coumpound pails, with both covers. Cut up one pail and secure a ring section of it to the sole. Set the second pail in it. Fabricate a seat and closing valve from one cover, possibly with a funnel on underside of this cover. Secure second pail and seat cover to sole and ring with a bungee. Use the second cover to seal and take home when departing vessel/rv/tent/etc.
Perfume to taste.

Henri
12-09-2000, 11:00 AM
A matching pair of 5 gal plastic paint/sheet rock coumpound pails, with both covers. Cut up one pail and secure a ring section of it to the sole. Set the second pail in it. Fabricate a seat and closing valve from one cover, possibly with a funnel on underside of this cover. Secure second pail and seat cover to sole and ring with a bungee. Use the second cover to seal and take home when departing vessel/rv/tent/etc.
Perfume to taste.

Henri
12-09-2000, 11:00 AM
A matching pair of 5 gal plastic paint/sheet rock coumpound pails, with both covers. Cut up one pail and secure a ring section of it to the sole. Set the second pail in it. Fabricate a seat and closing valve from one cover, possibly with a funnel on underside of this cover. Secure second pail and seat cover to sole and ring with a bungee. Use the second cover to seal and take home when departing vessel/rv/tent/etc.
Perfume to taste.

Dale Harvey
12-09-2000, 03:48 PM
Ah, but the muzzel loader analogy is just too good. Can you imagine pulling up to the big SeaRay that rolled your gunnels under in the ICW, and fireing off your potato cannon loaded with the days collection at his windshield! Think I'll start building one this evening.

Dale Harvey
12-09-2000, 03:48 PM
Ah, but the muzzel loader analogy is just too good. Can you imagine pulling up to the big SeaRay that rolled your gunnels under in the ICW, and fireing off your potato cannon loaded with the days collection at his windshield! Think I'll start building one this evening.

Dale Harvey
12-09-2000, 03:48 PM
Ah, but the muzzel loader analogy is just too good. Can you imagine pulling up to the big SeaRay that rolled your gunnels under in the ICW, and fireing off your potato cannon loaded with the days collection at his windshield! Think I'll start building one this evening.

Art Read
12-10-2000, 12:52 AM
Simple technique for "rinsing" your cedar bucket, should you find one... Drop the bucket top down into the water with plenty of slack on the lanyard. (This is AFTER you've already gotten rid of the contents of course...) Yank it back up in one, swift motion. With practice, this will fill the bucket without letting it take charge and draging you off the boat... even at considerable speed. It's one of those things, like coiling a long line on the deck instead of in your hand, that marks the true sailorman...

Art Read
12-10-2000, 12:52 AM
Simple technique for "rinsing" your cedar bucket, should you find one... Drop the bucket top down into the water with plenty of slack on the lanyard. (This is AFTER you've already gotten rid of the contents of course...) Yank it back up in one, swift motion. With practice, this will fill the bucket without letting it take charge and draging you off the boat... even at considerable speed. It's one of those things, like coiling a long line on the deck instead of in your hand, that marks the true sailorman...

Art Read
12-10-2000, 12:52 AM
Simple technique for "rinsing" your cedar bucket, should you find one... Drop the bucket top down into the water with plenty of slack on the lanyard. (This is AFTER you've already gotten rid of the contents of course...) Yank it back up in one, swift motion. With practice, this will fill the bucket without letting it take charge and draging you off the boat... even at considerable speed. It's one of those things, like coiling a long line on the deck instead of in your hand, that marks the true sailorman...

Jeff Kelety
12-10-2000, 11:16 PM
<It's one of those things, like coiling a long line on the deck instead of in your hand, that marks the true sailorman... >

Shoot <g>.

jgk

Jeff Kelety
12-10-2000, 11:16 PM
<It's one of those things, like coiling a long line on the deck instead of in your hand, that marks the true sailorman... >

Shoot <g>.

jgk

Jeff Kelety
12-10-2000, 11:16 PM
<It's one of those things, like coiling a long line on the deck instead of in your hand, that marks the true sailorman... >

Shoot <g>.

jgk

Art Read
12-11-2000, 11:58 AM
Well... You do need a pretty fair expanse of deck area to coil a long haliard down. Besides, a folkboat's lines should all be pretty manageable. Now, however, when you get that chance to volunteer aboard ADVENTUROUS, or perhaps "Sugar" Flannigan's pretty little schooner, you'll know what to do with all those coils falling through your fingers....

Art Read
12-11-2000, 11:58 AM
Well... You do need a pretty fair expanse of deck area to coil a long haliard down. Besides, a folkboat's lines should all be pretty manageable. Now, however, when you get that chance to volunteer aboard ADVENTUROUS, or perhaps "Sugar" Flannigan's pretty little schooner, you'll know what to do with all those coils falling through your fingers....

Art Read
12-11-2000, 11:58 AM
Well... You do need a pretty fair expanse of deck area to coil a long haliard down. Besides, a folkboat's lines should all be pretty manageable. Now, however, when you get that chance to volunteer aboard ADVENTUROUS, or perhaps "Sugar" Flannigan's pretty little schooner, you'll know what to do with all those coils falling through your fingers....

noquiklos
12-11-2000, 08:24 PM
Art, you meant Adventuress, didn't you?
Snicker.
Roy

noquiklos
12-11-2000, 08:24 PM
Art, you meant Adventuress, didn't you?
Snicker.
Roy

noquiklos
12-11-2000, 08:24 PM
Art, you meant Adventuress, didn't you?
Snicker.
Roy

Art Read
12-12-2000, 11:44 AM
yup! (Or Zodiac...)

Art Read
12-12-2000, 11:44 AM
yup! (Or Zodiac...)

Art Read
12-12-2000, 11:44 AM
yup! (Or Zodiac...)

Jeff Kelety
12-12-2000, 01:06 PM
<Now, however, when you get that chance to volunteer aboard ADVENTUROUS>

Hmmm. Good thought. Just took notice of her yesterday as a matter of fact, all buttoned downed and shrink wrapped for the winter in her white canvas (or plastic, couldn't tell which from afar).

I just got the Nais' cockpit and forward sections canvased up this week adding on to the boom tent I had made two years ago. I feel like such a responsible parent now <g>.

jgk

Jeff Kelety
12-12-2000, 01:06 PM
<Now, however, when you get that chance to volunteer aboard ADVENTUROUS>

Hmmm. Good thought. Just took notice of her yesterday as a matter of fact, all buttoned downed and shrink wrapped for the winter in her white canvas (or plastic, couldn't tell which from afar).

I just got the Nais' cockpit and forward sections canvased up this week adding on to the boom tent I had made two years ago. I feel like such a responsible parent now <g>.

jgk

Jeff Kelety
12-12-2000, 01:06 PM
<Now, however, when you get that chance to volunteer aboard ADVENTUROUS>

Hmmm. Good thought. Just took notice of her yesterday as a matter of fact, all buttoned downed and shrink wrapped for the winter in her white canvas (or plastic, couldn't tell which from afar).

I just got the Nais' cockpit and forward sections canvased up this week adding on to the boom tent I had made two years ago. I feel like such a responsible parent now <g>.

jgk

paladin
12-17-2000, 06:26 AM
Gents, the neatest solution to the "head" problem that I ever did see wuz on a Jim Brown designed 31 foot trimaran. The craft wuz center cockpit and the seat or where you sits down actually extended out over the lower part of the wing supporting the ama. This feller done cut him an appropriately shaped hole straight down thru the wing and put the coclpit cushion over it. He could be sailing along, lift the cushion, sit down and do his dooty without anyone the wiser.
Chuck

paladin
12-17-2000, 06:26 AM
Gents, the neatest solution to the "head" problem that I ever did see wuz on a Jim Brown designed 31 foot trimaran. The craft wuz center cockpit and the seat or where you sits down actually extended out over the lower part of the wing supporting the ama. This feller done cut him an appropriately shaped hole straight down thru the wing and put the coclpit cushion over it. He could be sailing along, lift the cushion, sit down and do his dooty without anyone the wiser.
Chuck

paladin
12-17-2000, 06:26 AM
Gents, the neatest solution to the "head" problem that I ever did see wuz on a Jim Brown designed 31 foot trimaran. The craft wuz center cockpit and the seat or where you sits down actually extended out over the lower part of the wing supporting the ama. This feller done cut him an appropriately shaped hole straight down thru the wing and put the coclpit cushion over it. He could be sailing along, lift the cushion, sit down and do his dooty without anyone the wiser.
Chuck

paladin
12-17-2000, 06:30 AM
Or again, you could do like I do for my pooch. Coil a bunch of line aft over a piece of indoor/outdoor carpet (the carpet has a hole in one corner and attached to the line), do your thing on the carpet and kick the whole shebang overboard. Strange thing about male bodies found floating on the bay, Coast guard reports that 85% had their flies open....take care.
Chuck

paladin
12-17-2000, 06:30 AM
Or again, you could do like I do for my pooch. Coil a bunch of line aft over a piece of indoor/outdoor carpet (the carpet has a hole in one corner and attached to the line), do your thing on the carpet and kick the whole shebang overboard. Strange thing about male bodies found floating on the bay, Coast guard reports that 85% had their flies open....take care.
Chuck

paladin
12-17-2000, 06:30 AM
Or again, you could do like I do for my pooch. Coil a bunch of line aft over a piece of indoor/outdoor carpet (the carpet has a hole in one corner and attached to the line), do your thing on the carpet and kick the whole shebang overboard. Strange thing about male bodies found floating on the bay, Coast guard reports that 85% had their flies open....take care.
Chuck

Charlie J
12-17-2000, 10:14 AM
The hole in the deck, at least on a multihull, is known as a "Spronk" head. Was developed by Peter Spronk on his big cats down in the Carribean. When Phil Weld had Rogue Wave built, he had one done on each side of the boat so you could always be on the weather side. Course his were inside the cabin.

Charlie J
12-17-2000, 10:14 AM
The hole in the deck, at least on a multihull, is known as a "Spronk" head. Was developed by Peter Spronk on his big cats down in the Carribean. When Phil Weld had Rogue Wave built, he had one done on each side of the boat so you could always be on the weather side. Course his were inside the cabin.

Charlie J
12-17-2000, 10:14 AM
The hole in the deck, at least on a multihull, is known as a "Spronk" head. Was developed by Peter Spronk on his big cats down in the Carribean. When Phil Weld had Rogue Wave built, he had one done on each side of the boat so you could always be on the weather side. Course his were inside the cabin.

paladin
12-19-2000, 07:59 AM
Well darnn fellas,
Take a long piece of line and attach a 2 foot by two foot sqaure of indoor/outdoor carpet to it. attach other end of line to stern cleat. Put carpet down on aft deck, coil line around and around to form "bucket".
Do your dooty and kick the thing overboard and tow astern for a couple of minutes......Works with my Cocker Spaniel, shouldn't be too difficult to train a hoomin people. Strange report from Chesapeake bay Coast guard, seems 85% of all male bodies recoverd from "man overboard" situations had their flies open........food for thought.
Regards

paladin
12-19-2000, 07:59 AM
Well darnn fellas,
Take a long piece of line and attach a 2 foot by two foot sqaure of indoor/outdoor carpet to it. attach other end of line to stern cleat. Put carpet down on aft deck, coil line around and around to form "bucket".
Do your dooty and kick the thing overboard and tow astern for a couple of minutes......Works with my Cocker Spaniel, shouldn't be too difficult to train a hoomin people. Strange report from Chesapeake bay Coast guard, seems 85% of all male bodies recoverd from "man overboard" situations had their flies open........food for thought.
Regards

paladin
12-19-2000, 07:59 AM
Well darnn fellas,
Take a long piece of line and attach a 2 foot by two foot sqaure of indoor/outdoor carpet to it. attach other end of line to stern cleat. Put carpet down on aft deck, coil line around and around to form "bucket".
Do your dooty and kick the thing overboard and tow astern for a couple of minutes......Works with my Cocker Spaniel, shouldn't be too difficult to train a hoomin people. Strange report from Chesapeake bay Coast guard, seems 85% of all male bodies recoverd from "man overboard" situations had their flies open........food for thought.
Regards