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gert
03-03-2001, 10:25 AM
oar locks come ooen and closed as I'm sure you all know but I only recently discovered. Why the two types, and which is more practical?

gert
03-03-2001, 10:25 AM
oar locks come ooen and closed as I'm sure you all know but I only recently discovered. Why the two types, and which is more practical?

gert
03-03-2001, 10:25 AM
oar locks come ooen and closed as I'm sure you all know but I only recently discovered. Why the two types, and which is more practical?

Thad
03-03-2001, 12:34 PM
Popular with whom? Like all these old developments different designs developed with differences in use as well as with regional variations. Different people take to one design or another for their own reasons. I have used round ones. I have used open ones. You can lift your oar out of an open lock. I have used Boston pattern open locks and moused the horns to hold the oar. Now I mostly use oval locks from Thomas Machine and Foundry in Washington because I thought they were a good idea, they are well done in a good material, and I like them.

Thad
03-03-2001, 12:34 PM
Popular with whom? Like all these old developments different designs developed with differences in use as well as with regional variations. Different people take to one design or another for their own reasons. I have used round ones. I have used open ones. You can lift your oar out of an open lock. I have used Boston pattern open locks and moused the horns to hold the oar. Now I mostly use oval locks from Thomas Machine and Foundry in Washington because I thought they were a good idea, they are well done in a good material, and I like them.

Thad
03-03-2001, 12:34 PM
Popular with whom? Like all these old developments different designs developed with differences in use as well as with regional variations. Different people take to one design or another for their own reasons. I have used round ones. I have used open ones. You can lift your oar out of an open lock. I have used Boston pattern open locks and moused the horns to hold the oar. Now I mostly use oval locks from Thomas Machine and Foundry in Washington because I thought they were a good idea, they are well done in a good material, and I like them.

Ian McColgin
03-03-2001, 03:46 PM
If you row only on flat water, round can be nice, especially if you have the oar leathered and buttoned, as the lock stays with the oar.

But, it's far harder to set the oar and lock into a tiney hole, and takes two hands at once, than to put the lock in and then drop the oar in the open top.

So, open top is faster and easier as you depart the dock, putting the lock and then oar in on the landing side. If the oar skips out of the lock on a wave, it's easy to put it back in. When landing, as you make that final turn and swoop to come against the boat or dock, it's easy to 'toss the oar' - formally that's popping the oar out of the lock and holding it verticle but in a dink, just popping and laying into the boat - one handed. Then you can pull the oar lock out just before you land. Longer to write then to do. It's about a second and a half evolution.

Did I admit I'm prejudiced against the round-tops?

Ian McColgin
03-03-2001, 03:46 PM
If you row only on flat water, round can be nice, especially if you have the oar leathered and buttoned, as the lock stays with the oar.

But, it's far harder to set the oar and lock into a tiney hole, and takes two hands at once, than to put the lock in and then drop the oar in the open top.

So, open top is faster and easier as you depart the dock, putting the lock and then oar in on the landing side. If the oar skips out of the lock on a wave, it's easy to put it back in. When landing, as you make that final turn and swoop to come against the boat or dock, it's easy to 'toss the oar' - formally that's popping the oar out of the lock and holding it verticle but in a dink, just popping and laying into the boat - one handed. Then you can pull the oar lock out just before you land. Longer to write then to do. It's about a second and a half evolution.

Did I admit I'm prejudiced against the round-tops?

Ian McColgin
03-03-2001, 03:46 PM
If you row only on flat water, round can be nice, especially if you have the oar leathered and buttoned, as the lock stays with the oar.

But, it's far harder to set the oar and lock into a tiney hole, and takes two hands at once, than to put the lock in and then drop the oar in the open top.

So, open top is faster and easier as you depart the dock, putting the lock and then oar in on the landing side. If the oar skips out of the lock on a wave, it's easy to put it back in. When landing, as you make that final turn and swoop to come against the boat or dock, it's easy to 'toss the oar' - formally that's popping the oar out of the lock and holding it verticle but in a dink, just popping and laying into the boat - one handed. Then you can pull the oar lock out just before you land. Longer to write then to do. It's about a second and a half evolution.

Did I admit I'm prejudiced against the round-tops?

Will
03-04-2001, 08:49 AM
Anyone know where I can find open oarllocks with an eyelet on the side for a tether? Is there a name for this type ?

Will
03-04-2001, 08:49 AM
Anyone know where I can find open oarllocks with an eyelet on the side for a tether? Is there a name for this type ?

Will
03-04-2001, 08:49 AM
Anyone know where I can find open oarllocks with an eyelet on the side for a tether? Is there a name for this type ?

Mike Field
03-04-2001, 05:01 PM
Never seen such, Will. Our rowloacks have a second small flange just above the flange that rests on the gunwale pad, leaving a groove between the two, and you can splice the end of some small stuff round the rowlock itself there without any fear of the line sliding off.

Leave the tail long enough so that when it's tied off to a frame or whatever, the rowlock can reach any of the rowing stations on that side.

(If your rowlocks happen to have a smallish hole drilled through the bottom end of the shaft, don't be tempted to use it as a tie-off point, or you'll be either forever tying and untying, or else trying to feed the line down through the shaft hole -- both very patience-wearing operations.)

Mike Field
03-04-2001, 05:01 PM
Never seen such, Will. Our rowloacks have a second small flange just above the flange that rests on the gunwale pad, leaving a groove between the two, and you can splice the end of some small stuff round the rowlock itself there without any fear of the line sliding off.

Leave the tail long enough so that when it's tied off to a frame or whatever, the rowlock can reach any of the rowing stations on that side.

(If your rowlocks happen to have a smallish hole drilled through the bottom end of the shaft, don't be tempted to use it as a tie-off point, or you'll be either forever tying and untying, or else trying to feed the line down through the shaft hole -- both very patience-wearing operations.)

Mike Field
03-04-2001, 05:01 PM
Never seen such, Will. Our rowloacks have a second small flange just above the flange that rests on the gunwale pad, leaving a groove between the two, and you can splice the end of some small stuff round the rowlock itself there without any fear of the line sliding off.

Leave the tail long enough so that when it's tied off to a frame or whatever, the rowlock can reach any of the rowing stations on that side.

(If your rowlocks happen to have a smallish hole drilled through the bottom end of the shaft, don't be tempted to use it as a tie-off point, or you'll be either forever tying and untying, or else trying to feed the line down through the shaft hole -- both very patience-wearing operations.)

rbgarr
03-04-2001, 11:04 PM
Will-

I know the type you are thinking of, but don't know the pattern name. Perhaps you could drill a hole in the horn flange of these Wilcox Crittendon type oarlocks if you can't find what you want?

http://cgi.ebay.com/aw-cgi/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=1117942802

http://cgi.ebay.com/aw-cgi/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=1119120666

rbgarr
03-04-2001, 11:04 PM
Will-

I know the type you are thinking of, but don't know the pattern name. Perhaps you could drill a hole in the horn flange of these Wilcox Crittendon type oarlocks if you can't find what you want?

http://cgi.ebay.com/aw-cgi/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=1117942802

http://cgi.ebay.com/aw-cgi/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=1119120666

rbgarr
03-04-2001, 11:04 PM
Will-

I know the type you are thinking of, but don't know the pattern name. Perhaps you could drill a hole in the horn flange of these Wilcox Crittendon type oarlocks if you can't find what you want?

http://cgi.ebay.com/aw-cgi/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=1117942802

http://cgi.ebay.com/aw-cgi/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=1119120666

Charlie J
03-05-2001, 09:06 AM
Mike - I remember years ago seeing that type of lock with a small chain and a wire toggle fastened to the hole. You turned the toggle parallel to the chain and dropped it through the rowlock mount. The chain was long enough to lift the the lock free of the hole - then you could allow it to hang on the inside of the boat so it wouldn't snag docks and things ( or gouge the side of a hull)

Charlie J
03-05-2001, 09:06 AM
Mike - I remember years ago seeing that type of lock with a small chain and a wire toggle fastened to the hole. You turned the toggle parallel to the chain and dropped it through the rowlock mount. The chain was long enough to lift the the lock free of the hole - then you could allow it to hang on the inside of the boat so it wouldn't snag docks and things ( or gouge the side of a hull)

Charlie J
03-05-2001, 09:06 AM
Mike - I remember years ago seeing that type of lock with a small chain and a wire toggle fastened to the hole. You turned the toggle parallel to the chain and dropped it through the rowlock mount. The chain was long enough to lift the the lock free of the hole - then you could allow it to hang on the inside of the boat so it wouldn't snag docks and things ( or gouge the side of a hull)

Will
03-05-2001, 09:45 AM
I've got the Wilcox Locks , which I think are esthetically perfect , but I may have to drill a hole in them as you suggest . My boat is light and easily driven so I'm unlikely to break a weakened lock , I hope .

Mike ; in these parts a short lanyard of rope or chain is used in the shafts end hole and finished with a toggle . The laniard stays rove thru the oarlock mount and the lock dangles from it when not in use . Not a bad system in an open dingy with no place to store the locks . The laniard is very short and feeds smoothly as the lock is set in place one handed. Also the toggle is made longer than the mounting hole is deep , so in cases when the laniard does need to be removed and later replaced it's simple to stick the toggle in the hole and pull it thru from below .

I have a small sailboat with sidedecks and in this the system is less good .The length of laniard required to bring the lock inboard when unshipped is too long to feed back unaided when mounting the locks . You have to pull on the laniard from below , now a two handed job . Worse , the slack laniard is long enough to tangle and generally be a nusiance . So few daysailers seem to be fitted to row these days , maybe that's why the "side eye " locks have dissapeared ?

Will
03-05-2001, 09:45 AM
I've got the Wilcox Locks , which I think are esthetically perfect , but I may have to drill a hole in them as you suggest . My boat is light and easily driven so I'm unlikely to break a weakened lock , I hope .

Mike ; in these parts a short lanyard of rope or chain is used in the shafts end hole and finished with a toggle . The laniard stays rove thru the oarlock mount and the lock dangles from it when not in use . Not a bad system in an open dingy with no place to store the locks . The laniard is very short and feeds smoothly as the lock is set in place one handed. Also the toggle is made longer than the mounting hole is deep , so in cases when the laniard does need to be removed and later replaced it's simple to stick the toggle in the hole and pull it thru from below .

I have a small sailboat with sidedecks and in this the system is less good .The length of laniard required to bring the lock inboard when unshipped is too long to feed back unaided when mounting the locks . You have to pull on the laniard from below , now a two handed job . Worse , the slack laniard is long enough to tangle and generally be a nusiance . So few daysailers seem to be fitted to row these days , maybe that's why the "side eye " locks have dissapeared ?

Will
03-05-2001, 09:45 AM
I've got the Wilcox Locks , which I think are esthetically perfect , but I may have to drill a hole in them as you suggest . My boat is light and easily driven so I'm unlikely to break a weakened lock , I hope .

Mike ; in these parts a short lanyard of rope or chain is used in the shafts end hole and finished with a toggle . The laniard stays rove thru the oarlock mount and the lock dangles from it when not in use . Not a bad system in an open dingy with no place to store the locks . The laniard is very short and feeds smoothly as the lock is set in place one handed. Also the toggle is made longer than the mounting hole is deep , so in cases when the laniard does need to be removed and later replaced it's simple to stick the toggle in the hole and pull it thru from below .

I have a small sailboat with sidedecks and in this the system is less good .The length of laniard required to bring the lock inboard when unshipped is too long to feed back unaided when mounting the locks . You have to pull on the laniard from below , now a two handed job . Worse , the slack laniard is long enough to tangle and generally be a nusiance . So few daysailers seem to be fitted to row these days , maybe that's why the "side eye " locks have dissapeared ?

Mike Field
03-05-2001, 07:24 PM
Will and CE, I guess that comment of mine was premised on the fact that I need to remove the rowlocks altogether for safekeeping every time I leave the boat.

Splicing a bit of line round the neck just below the crutch has answered pretty well for me, as I can mount or dismount the rowlock just by pushing or pulling the shank through the hole, and yet the rowlock still remains captive to the boat as long as the other end of the lanyard is tied off somewhere.

In Aileen Louisa (and many other larger dinghies I know,) there are two rowing stations, allowing a choice of position for the rower depending on the load he's carrying. So another advantage of the spliced-lanyard method is that it lets me use the rowlock in the mounts at either station, without having to unfasten and unthread the lanyard first.

I must say that I did try the threading-through method early on -- and it certainly looked neater -- but I gave it away because it didn't seem as practical in my situation.

[This message has been edited by Mike Field (edited 03-06-2001).]

Mike Field
03-05-2001, 07:24 PM
Will and CE, I guess that comment of mine was premised on the fact that I need to remove the rowlocks altogether for safekeeping every time I leave the boat.

Splicing a bit of line round the neck just below the crutch has answered pretty well for me, as I can mount or dismount the rowlock just by pushing or pulling the shank through the hole, and yet the rowlock still remains captive to the boat as long as the other end of the lanyard is tied off somewhere.

In Aileen Louisa (and many other larger dinghies I know,) there are two rowing stations, allowing a choice of position for the rower depending on the load he's carrying. So another advantage of the spliced-lanyard method is that it lets me use the rowlock in the mounts at either station, without having to unfasten and unthread the lanyard first.

I must say that I did try the threading-through method early on -- and it certainly looked neater -- but I gave it away because it didn't seem as practical in my situation.

[This message has been edited by Mike Field (edited 03-06-2001).]

Mike Field
03-05-2001, 07:24 PM
Will and CE, I guess that comment of mine was premised on the fact that I need to remove the rowlocks altogether for safekeeping every time I leave the boat.

Splicing a bit of line round the neck just below the crutch has answered pretty well for me, as I can mount or dismount the rowlock just by pushing or pulling the shank through the hole, and yet the rowlock still remains captive to the boat as long as the other end of the lanyard is tied off somewhere.

In Aileen Louisa (and many other larger dinghies I know,) there are two rowing stations, allowing a choice of position for the rower depending on the load he's carrying. So another advantage of the spliced-lanyard method is that it lets me use the rowlock in the mounts at either station, without having to unfasten and unthread the lanyard first.

I must say that I did try the threading-through method early on -- and it certainly looked neater -- but I gave it away because it didn't seem as practical in my situation.

[This message has been edited by Mike Field (edited 03-06-2001).]

Albie
03-12-2001, 12:26 PM
Rowlocks with uneven tops on the horns are the most practical (and far more attractive).
Dyer makes them but sells them only with their inorganic Dhow. Why buy one of those when you can build the far superior Nutshell?
Anyways, the Dyer rowlocks are a bit heavy looking and clumsy. I have used for years and heartily recommend the #1066 gunmetal rowlocks from Davey & Co. of London,UK. The shafts are longer and one of the horns is longer. Oars do not slip out, even with short oars and high freeboard. The Woodenboat Store in Seattle stocked them at one time. They can be directly purchased from Davey (they have a great range of traditional stuff) at chandlery@davey.co.uk


[This message has been edited by Albie (edited 03-12-2001).]

Albie
03-12-2001, 12:26 PM
Rowlocks with uneven tops on the horns are the most practical (and far more attractive).
Dyer makes them but sells them only with their inorganic Dhow. Why buy one of those when you can build the far superior Nutshell?
Anyways, the Dyer rowlocks are a bit heavy looking and clumsy. I have used for years and heartily recommend the #1066 gunmetal rowlocks from Davey & Co. of London,UK. The shafts are longer and one of the horns is longer. Oars do not slip out, even with short oars and high freeboard. The Woodenboat Store in Seattle stocked them at one time. They can be directly purchased from Davey (they have a great range of traditional stuff) at chandlery@davey.co.uk


[This message has been edited by Albie (edited 03-12-2001).]

Albie
03-12-2001, 12:26 PM
Rowlocks with uneven tops on the horns are the most practical (and far more attractive).
Dyer makes them but sells them only with their inorganic Dhow. Why buy one of those when you can build the far superior Nutshell?
Anyways, the Dyer rowlocks are a bit heavy looking and clumsy. I have used for years and heartily recommend the #1066 gunmetal rowlocks from Davey & Co. of London,UK. The shafts are longer and one of the horns is longer. Oars do not slip out, even with short oars and high freeboard. The Woodenboat Store in Seattle stocked them at one time. They can be directly purchased from Davey (they have a great range of traditional stuff) at chandlery@davey.co.uk


[This message has been edited by Albie (edited 03-12-2001).]

Rob H
03-13-2001, 05:03 AM
Whatever happened to those lovely Ashbreeze locks? I had a couple sets on my Bolger dory. They were bronze, and offset so that the working face of the forward horn was right over the centerline of the shank below, and the forward horn was straight, so the oar had no tendency to wobble in your hands. I haven't seen them in years, but they were the best oarlocks I have ever used.

Rob H
03-13-2001, 05:03 AM
Whatever happened to those lovely Ashbreeze locks? I had a couple sets on my Bolger dory. They were bronze, and offset so that the working face of the forward horn was right over the centerline of the shank below, and the forward horn was straight, so the oar had no tendency to wobble in your hands. I haven't seen them in years, but they were the best oarlocks I have ever used.

Rob H
03-13-2001, 05:03 AM
Whatever happened to those lovely Ashbreeze locks? I had a couple sets on my Bolger dory. They were bronze, and offset so that the working face of the forward horn was right over the centerline of the shank below, and the forward horn was straight, so the oar had no tendency to wobble in your hands. I haven't seen them in years, but they were the best oarlocks I have ever used.

Albie
03-13-2001, 09:00 AM
DAVEY'S #1056 APPEARS TO BE SIMILAR.

Albie
03-13-2001, 09:00 AM
DAVEY'S #1056 APPEARS TO BE SIMILAR.

Albie
03-13-2001, 09:00 AM
DAVEY'S #1056 APPEARS TO BE SIMILAR.

BillP
03-17-2001, 09:49 PM
My preference is the round, especially in rough water with my 10'lap nutshell clone dink.

bp

BillP
03-17-2001, 09:49 PM
My preference is the round, especially in rough water with my 10'lap nutshell clone dink.

bp

BillP
03-17-2001, 09:49 PM
My preference is the round, especially in rough water with my 10'lap nutshell clone dink.

bp