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T.KAMILA
03-03-2001, 07:55 PM
Iím making the rope-strapped blocks for my catboat and am wondering what is the best rope to use for the rope grommets. The sheaves are two inch diameter bronze for 3/8 three strand spun dacron rope. The blocks are ash.

Thanks,
Tom

T.KAMILA
03-03-2001, 07:55 PM
Iím making the rope-strapped blocks for my catboat and am wondering what is the best rope to use for the rope grommets. The sheaves are two inch diameter bronze for 3/8 three strand spun dacron rope. The blocks are ash.

Thanks,
Tom

T.KAMILA
03-03-2001, 07:55 PM
Iím making the rope-strapped blocks for my catboat and am wondering what is the best rope to use for the rope grommets. The sheaves are two inch diameter bronze for 3/8 three strand spun dacron rope. The blocks are ash.

Thanks,
Tom

Dale Harvey
03-03-2001, 11:17 PM
Strap should be of dacron, but I also use the all black polypropelene potwarp. Three strand for spliceing and siezed with waxed dacron twine. Take a coule of extra tucks if useing the poly.

Dale Harvey
03-03-2001, 11:17 PM
Strap should be of dacron, but I also use the all black polypropelene potwarp. Three strand for spliceing and siezed with waxed dacron twine. Take a coule of extra tucks if useing the poly.

Dale Harvey
03-03-2001, 11:17 PM
Strap should be of dacron, but I also use the all black polypropelene potwarp. Three strand for spliceing and siezed with waxed dacron twine. Take a coule of extra tucks if useing the poly.

Todd Bradshaw
03-04-2001, 03:16 AM
New England Ropes three-strand filament polyester (West Marine carries it by the foot - cheap) is pretty good stuff and about as stretch-resistant as you'll find in a three-strand construction. I dunk it in "Early American" Minwax oil stain, rinse it well with naptha and end-up with something pretty close in color to natural fiber line.

Todd Bradshaw
03-04-2001, 03:16 AM
New England Ropes three-strand filament polyester (West Marine carries it by the foot - cheap) is pretty good stuff and about as stretch-resistant as you'll find in a three-strand construction. I dunk it in "Early American" Minwax oil stain, rinse it well with naptha and end-up with something pretty close in color to natural fiber line.

Todd Bradshaw
03-04-2001, 03:16 AM
New England Ropes three-strand filament polyester (West Marine carries it by the foot - cheap) is pretty good stuff and about as stretch-resistant as you'll find in a three-strand construction. I dunk it in "Early American" Minwax oil stain, rinse it well with naptha and end-up with something pretty close in color to natural fiber line.

Mike Field
03-04-2001, 06:43 AM
..or of course you could use real fibre.

We typically use sisal for the grommet, but pe for the seizing.

http://albums.photopoint.com/j/View?u=1231924&a=9091792&p=32647586&Sequence=0&res=high

Mike Field
03-04-2001, 06:43 AM
..or of course you could use real fibre.

We typically use sisal for the grommet, but pe for the seizing.

http://albums.photopoint.com/j/View?u=1231924&a=9091792&p=32647586&Sequence=0&res=high

Mike Field
03-04-2001, 06:43 AM
..or of course you could use real fibre.

We typically use sisal for the grommet, but pe for the seizing.

http://albums.photopoint.com/j/View?u=1231924&a=9091792&p=32647586&Sequence=0&res=high

J. Dillon
03-04-2001, 11:56 AM
In a pinch I've used nylon. To stretch it, I reeved a line in the block and secured it firmly. With the grommet placed around the block, I pre stretched it using two double block tackle attached to a round thimble placed in the grommet. Using waxed sail twine I seized up a throat on the grommet between the thimble and block. This stretched the nylon even more when seized up tight in the throat. When finished it is extremely tight around all members with no inclination to come loose.

If you intend to splice on a rope strop I make a tapered eye splice,snug on the block. Stretch as before and apply the seizing tightly starting at the splice end and work up to the block & eye splice. When finished with either method I apply bee's was to the seizing.

JD

[This message has been edited by J. Dillon (edited 03-04-2001).]

J. Dillon
03-04-2001, 11:56 AM
In a pinch I've used nylon. To stretch it, I reeved a line in the block and secured it firmly. With the grommet placed around the block, I pre stretched it using two double block tackle attached to a round thimble placed in the grommet. Using waxed sail twine I seized up a throat on the grommet between the thimble and block. This stretched the nylon even more when seized up tight in the throat. When finished it is extremely tight around all members with no inclination to come loose.

If you intend to splice on a rope strop I make a tapered eye splice,snug on the block. Stretch as before and apply the seizing tightly starting at the splice end and work up to the block & eye splice. When finished with either method I apply bee's was to the seizing.

JD

[This message has been edited by J. Dillon (edited 03-04-2001).]

J. Dillon
03-04-2001, 11:56 AM
In a pinch I've used nylon. To stretch it, I reeved a line in the block and secured it firmly. With the grommet placed around the block, I pre stretched it using two double block tackle attached to a round thimble placed in the grommet. Using waxed sail twine I seized up a throat on the grommet between the thimble and block. This stretched the nylon even more when seized up tight in the throat. When finished it is extremely tight around all members with no inclination to come loose.

If you intend to splice on a rope strop I make a tapered eye splice,snug on the block. Stretch as before and apply the seizing tightly starting at the splice end and work up to the block & eye splice. When finished with either method I apply bee's was to the seizing.

JD

[This message has been edited by J. Dillon (edited 03-04-2001).]

Dave Hadfield
03-04-2001, 12:10 PM
Well, if you use Manilla, you can drop the whole block in a bucket of rope sauce to preserve/rejuvenate it. It also splices really well -- very grippy. I would rather use Manilla than Sisal.

For seizing, I use tarred nylon --great stuff and available from various fisherman supply places.

For synthetic ropes, English Braids has a Buff Polyester (search this and see past threads) that looks traditional but has the advantages of polyester.

Overall though, I've used the Manilla for my mainsheet blocks for 2 years without a problem. I also use it for the blocks that take me to the masthead via my bosun's chair -- you can't find more trust than that!

Where did you get the bronze sheaves? I ended up turning my own out of Jotoba. Also, what are you doing for thimbles? Once again I ended making my own by flaring sections of copper pipe.

Good Luck,

Dave

BTW, I think the term is rope-stropped, not strapped -- at least that's what I've been calling it.

[This message has been edited by Dave Hadfield (edited 03-04-2001).]

Dave Hadfield
03-04-2001, 12:10 PM
Well, if you use Manilla, you can drop the whole block in a bucket of rope sauce to preserve/rejuvenate it. It also splices really well -- very grippy. I would rather use Manilla than Sisal.

For seizing, I use tarred nylon --great stuff and available from various fisherman supply places.

For synthetic ropes, English Braids has a Buff Polyester (search this and see past threads) that looks traditional but has the advantages of polyester.

Overall though, I've used the Manilla for my mainsheet blocks for 2 years without a problem. I also use it for the blocks that take me to the masthead via my bosun's chair -- you can't find more trust than that!

Where did you get the bronze sheaves? I ended up turning my own out of Jotoba. Also, what are you doing for thimbles? Once again I ended making my own by flaring sections of copper pipe.

Good Luck,

Dave

BTW, I think the term is rope-stropped, not strapped -- at least that's what I've been calling it.

[This message has been edited by Dave Hadfield (edited 03-04-2001).]

Dave Hadfield
03-04-2001, 12:10 PM
Well, if you use Manilla, you can drop the whole block in a bucket of rope sauce to preserve/rejuvenate it. It also splices really well -- very grippy. I would rather use Manilla than Sisal.

For seizing, I use tarred nylon --great stuff and available from various fisherman supply places.

For synthetic ropes, English Braids has a Buff Polyester (search this and see past threads) that looks traditional but has the advantages of polyester.

Overall though, I've used the Manilla for my mainsheet blocks for 2 years without a problem. I also use it for the blocks that take me to the masthead via my bosun's chair -- you can't find more trust than that!

Where did you get the bronze sheaves? I ended up turning my own out of Jotoba. Also, what are you doing for thimbles? Once again I ended making my own by flaring sections of copper pipe.

Good Luck,

Dave

BTW, I think the term is rope-stropped, not strapped -- at least that's what I've been calling it.

[This message has been edited by Dave Hadfield (edited 03-04-2001).]

Mike Field
03-04-2001, 05:49 PM
Dave

I'd prefer to use hemp overall, too, I think. Sisal's quite OK, though, and is readily available here, whereas hemp is not. (I prefer not to use artifical line unless there's a good reason to, and then I try to get a natural-fibre look-alike if possible.)

We certainly use the word "strop" for this operation (as in the UK,) but I've noticed before that some North Americans (including Hervey Garrett Smith) use "strap" instead.

Thimbles and sheaves, if bronze, are turned. We often use tufnol for sheaves, too, which works pretty well. (In fact, I've even seen small blocks made completely from tufnol --they work fine, and they look quite good too.) And ocassionally, turned hardwood (as in the picture -- sorry about the size of which, by the way.)

I like the peened-copper idea for thimbles, but we've never succeeded in getting them to look as professional as our clients seeem to think is appropriate.

Jack

I'm not clear about your meaning when talking about splicing, here. Would you splice for a normal thimble-stropping, or only if you wanted to leave a rope tail for one block of a tackle?

I would always use a properly-worked grommet for stropping to a thimble. I've seen short-spliced "grommets" used for this purpose, and I think they're not as strong (as well as looking rather knobby and unseamanlike, too.) But I have spliced as in the paragraph above.

Mike Field
03-04-2001, 05:49 PM
Dave

I'd prefer to use hemp overall, too, I think. Sisal's quite OK, though, and is readily available here, whereas hemp is not. (I prefer not to use artifical line unless there's a good reason to, and then I try to get a natural-fibre look-alike if possible.)

We certainly use the word "strop" for this operation (as in the UK,) but I've noticed before that some North Americans (including Hervey Garrett Smith) use "strap" instead.

Thimbles and sheaves, if bronze, are turned. We often use tufnol for sheaves, too, which works pretty well. (In fact, I've even seen small blocks made completely from tufnol --they work fine, and they look quite good too.) And ocassionally, turned hardwood (as in the picture -- sorry about the size of which, by the way.)

I like the peened-copper idea for thimbles, but we've never succeeded in getting them to look as professional as our clients seeem to think is appropriate.

Jack

I'm not clear about your meaning when talking about splicing, here. Would you splice for a normal thimble-stropping, or only if you wanted to leave a rope tail for one block of a tackle?

I would always use a properly-worked grommet for stropping to a thimble. I've seen short-spliced "grommets" used for this purpose, and I think they're not as strong (as well as looking rather knobby and unseamanlike, too.) But I have spliced as in the paragraph above.

Mike Field
03-04-2001, 05:49 PM
Dave

I'd prefer to use hemp overall, too, I think. Sisal's quite OK, though, and is readily available here, whereas hemp is not. (I prefer not to use artifical line unless there's a good reason to, and then I try to get a natural-fibre look-alike if possible.)

We certainly use the word "strop" for this operation (as in the UK,) but I've noticed before that some North Americans (including Hervey Garrett Smith) use "strap" instead.

Thimbles and sheaves, if bronze, are turned. We often use tufnol for sheaves, too, which works pretty well. (In fact, I've even seen small blocks made completely from tufnol --they work fine, and they look quite good too.) And ocassionally, turned hardwood (as in the picture -- sorry about the size of which, by the way.)

I like the peened-copper idea for thimbles, but we've never succeeded in getting them to look as professional as our clients seeem to think is appropriate.

Jack

I'm not clear about your meaning when talking about splicing, here. Would you splice for a normal thimble-stropping, or only if you wanted to leave a rope tail for one block of a tackle?

I would always use a properly-worked grommet for stropping to a thimble. I've seen short-spliced "grommets" used for this purpose, and I think they're not as strong (as well as looking rather knobby and unseamanlike, too.) But I have spliced as in the paragraph above.

J. Dillon
03-04-2001, 06:19 PM
Mike,

Sorry for the ambiguity. I splice only when the block intended is for a strop with a "tail". When making a grommet for a strop, I use the time tested method of using one strand of three strand rope, "marrying" up again to a three strand configuration. Sometimes because Dacron and nylon has little "memory" of its former twist like manila has, one has to coax it into placement by a little twisting as one makes up the grommet. It's a little difficult describing and much easier by demonstration.

Perhaps in the not too distant future "in time" demo's over the internet will be a reality.

JD

J. Dillon
03-04-2001, 06:19 PM
Mike,

Sorry for the ambiguity. I splice only when the block intended is for a strop with a "tail". When making a grommet for a strop, I use the time tested method of using one strand of three strand rope, "marrying" up again to a three strand configuration. Sometimes because Dacron and nylon has little "memory" of its former twist like manila has, one has to coax it into placement by a little twisting as one makes up the grommet. It's a little difficult describing and much easier by demonstration.

Perhaps in the not too distant future "in time" demo's over the internet will be a reality.

JD

J. Dillon
03-04-2001, 06:19 PM
Mike,

Sorry for the ambiguity. I splice only when the block intended is for a strop with a "tail". When making a grommet for a strop, I use the time tested method of using one strand of three strand rope, "marrying" up again to a three strand configuration. Sometimes because Dacron and nylon has little "memory" of its former twist like manila has, one has to coax it into placement by a little twisting as one makes up the grommet. It's a little difficult describing and much easier by demonstration.

Perhaps in the not too distant future "in time" demo's over the internet will be a reality.

JD

Dave Hadfield
03-04-2001, 07:28 PM
Nice to see we're all pretty much in agreement here.

When people see my traditional blocks, they don't see them as I do. They see quaint -- I see functional and cost effective. I also see them as momentos of winter evenings in the shop, well spent.

You're right Mike about the thimbles, each one is an individual.

Dave

Dave Hadfield
03-04-2001, 07:28 PM
Nice to see we're all pretty much in agreement here.

When people see my traditional blocks, they don't see them as I do. They see quaint -- I see functional and cost effective. I also see them as momentos of winter evenings in the shop, well spent.

You're right Mike about the thimbles, each one is an individual.

Dave

Dave Hadfield
03-04-2001, 07:28 PM
Nice to see we're all pretty much in agreement here.

When people see my traditional blocks, they don't see them as I do. They see quaint -- I see functional and cost effective. I also see them as momentos of winter evenings in the shop, well spent.

You're right Mike about the thimbles, each one is an individual.

Dave

Mike Field
03-04-2001, 10:54 PM
In the three hours or so since my last post, I've just picked up from the post office another of HGS's books, and I notice he uses "strOp" exclusively in it. So I checked the earlier book, and yes, I was right, "strAp" exclusively.

I guess even The Man himself might have found he's had it wrong. (Or maybe he just had Editor problems like many another author before him.)

What I want to know though, Jack, is if you've ever tried splicing COTTON? It's like trying to put a bowl of spaghetti back together.

Dave -- functional, cost effective, more attractive, quieter, and kinder to everything they come in contact with. Just like us.

[This message has been edited by Mike Field (edited 03-05-2001).]

Mike Field
03-04-2001, 10:54 PM
In the three hours or so since my last post, I've just picked up from the post office another of HGS's books, and I notice he uses "strOp" exclusively in it. So I checked the earlier book, and yes, I was right, "strAp" exclusively.

I guess even The Man himself might have found he's had it wrong. (Or maybe he just had Editor problems like many another author before him.)

What I want to know though, Jack, is if you've ever tried splicing COTTON? It's like trying to put a bowl of spaghetti back together.

Dave -- functional, cost effective, more attractive, quieter, and kinder to everything they come in contact with. Just like us.

[This message has been edited by Mike Field (edited 03-05-2001).]

Mike Field
03-04-2001, 10:54 PM
In the three hours or so since my last post, I've just picked up from the post office another of HGS's books, and I notice he uses "strOp" exclusively in it. So I checked the earlier book, and yes, I was right, "strAp" exclusively.

I guess even The Man himself might have found he's had it wrong. (Or maybe he just had Editor problems like many another author before him.)

What I want to know though, Jack, is if you've ever tried splicing COTTON? It's like trying to put a bowl of spaghetti back together.

Dave -- functional, cost effective, more attractive, quieter, and kinder to everything they come in contact with. Just like us.

[This message has been edited by Mike Field (edited 03-05-2001).]

holzbt
03-05-2001, 07:25 AM
Dave, if you are trying to make a grommet out of cotton or even soft spun dacron you can first make one out of polypro. This will act as a template. As you twist and wind the soft stuff around you unwind the poly until you are finished. It won't help you splice but it sure makes it less of a hassle to make grommets out of stuff that won't hold its lay.

holzbt
03-05-2001, 07:25 AM
Dave, if you are trying to make a grommet out of cotton or even soft spun dacron you can first make one out of polypro. This will act as a template. As you twist and wind the soft stuff around you unwind the poly until you are finished. It won't help you splice but it sure makes it less of a hassle to make grommets out of stuff that won't hold its lay.

holzbt
03-05-2001, 07:25 AM
Dave, if you are trying to make a grommet out of cotton or even soft spun dacron you can first make one out of polypro. This will act as a template. As you twist and wind the soft stuff around you unwind the poly until you are finished. It won't help you splice but it sure makes it less of a hassle to make grommets out of stuff that won't hold its lay.

T.KAMILA
03-05-2001, 08:03 AM
Brion Toss Rope-Stropped, Handbook of Knots and Splices Rope Strop, The Arts of the Sailor Rope-Strapped, An A-Z of Sailing Terms only lists Strop, so I guess Strop it is.
That out of the way, back to the best rope. I have some three strand filament polyester but am having trouble with the memory of the yarns. I am experimenting with soaking it in bees wax to stiffen and give it some character by coloring it. It seems to stiffen it up but I havenít tried making a grommet yet. Iíll keep you updated. Sounds like manila is a good choice, you even get to cook up some great smelly stuff to soak it in. How about hemp?
For sheaves and thimbles I turned them out of bronze rod, and for the blocks I used ash following directions from the book The Artís of the Sailor.
Is good manila hard to come by? Any sources would be appreciated.

Tom

T.KAMILA
03-05-2001, 08:03 AM
Brion Toss Rope-Stropped, Handbook of Knots and Splices Rope Strop, The Arts of the Sailor Rope-Strapped, An A-Z of Sailing Terms only lists Strop, so I guess Strop it is.
That out of the way, back to the best rope. I have some three strand filament polyester but am having trouble with the memory of the yarns. I am experimenting with soaking it in bees wax to stiffen and give it some character by coloring it. It seems to stiffen it up but I havenít tried making a grommet yet. Iíll keep you updated. Sounds like manila is a good choice, you even get to cook up some great smelly stuff to soak it in. How about hemp?
For sheaves and thimbles I turned them out of bronze rod, and for the blocks I used ash following directions from the book The Artís of the Sailor.
Is good manila hard to come by? Any sources would be appreciated.

Tom

T.KAMILA
03-05-2001, 08:03 AM
Brion Toss Rope-Stropped, Handbook of Knots and Splices Rope Strop, The Arts of the Sailor Rope-Strapped, An A-Z of Sailing Terms only lists Strop, so I guess Strop it is.
That out of the way, back to the best rope. I have some three strand filament polyester but am having trouble with the memory of the yarns. I am experimenting with soaking it in bees wax to stiffen and give it some character by coloring it. It seems to stiffen it up but I havenít tried making a grommet yet. Iíll keep you updated. Sounds like manila is a good choice, you even get to cook up some great smelly stuff to soak it in. How about hemp?
For sheaves and thimbles I turned them out of bronze rod, and for the blocks I used ash following directions from the book The Artís of the Sailor.
Is good manila hard to come by? Any sources would be appreciated.

Tom

NormMessinger
03-05-2001, 10:21 AM
Speakin' of Brian Toss, he recommends the thickest least perfumed brand of hair gel be used to keep artificial rope strands in place when splicing or making grommets. I don't have enough hair to know what he's talkin' about but it sounds right.

--Norm

NormMessinger
03-05-2001, 10:21 AM
Speakin' of Brian Toss, he recommends the thickest least perfumed brand of hair gel be used to keep artificial rope strands in place when splicing or making grommets. I don't have enough hair to know what he's talkin' about but it sounds right.

--Norm

NormMessinger
03-05-2001, 10:21 AM
Speakin' of Brian Toss, he recommends the thickest least perfumed brand of hair gel be used to keep artificial rope strands in place when splicing or making grommets. I don't have enough hair to know what he's talkin' about but it sounds right.

--Norm

T.KAMILA
03-05-2001, 11:10 AM
Sitting around this morning waiting for the big storm I continued my experiment with bees wax. I melted it down and added some pitch or rosin left over from making a telescope mirror about fifteen years ago. The stuff looks and smells like pine tar. This added some color to the rope. I soaked the rope for the grommet in the hot wax for about fifteen minutes. Took it out and twisted it to get the excess wax out. Let it cool and unraveled it o make the grommet. What a difference! Kind of like the stuff we used to use on the front of our crew cut to make the hair stand up back in the early sixties before all hell broke loose. Well I made a grommet and seized it up onto a block and thimble. Here are the results. Making a grommet before was about a nine in difficulty this was about a three. Still gonna try manila.

http://albums.photopoint.com/j/View?u=1330151&a=9891760&p=42792280

[This message has been edited by T.KAMILA (edited 03-05-2001).]

T.KAMILA
03-05-2001, 11:10 AM
Sitting around this morning waiting for the big storm I continued my experiment with bees wax. I melted it down and added some pitch or rosin left over from making a telescope mirror about fifteen years ago. The stuff looks and smells like pine tar. This added some color to the rope. I soaked the rope for the grommet in the hot wax for about fifteen minutes. Took it out and twisted it to get the excess wax out. Let it cool and unraveled it o make the grommet. What a difference! Kind of like the stuff we used to use on the front of our crew cut to make the hair stand up back in the early sixties before all hell broke loose. Well I made a grommet and seized it up onto a block and thimble. Here are the results. Making a grommet before was about a nine in difficulty this was about a three. Still gonna try manila.

http://albums.photopoint.com/j/View?u=1330151&a=9891760&p=42792280

[This message has been edited by T.KAMILA (edited 03-05-2001).]

T.KAMILA
03-05-2001, 11:10 AM
Sitting around this morning waiting for the big storm I continued my experiment with bees wax. I melted it down and added some pitch or rosin left over from making a telescope mirror about fifteen years ago. The stuff looks and smells like pine tar. This added some color to the rope. I soaked the rope for the grommet in the hot wax for about fifteen minutes. Took it out and twisted it to get the excess wax out. Let it cool and unraveled it o make the grommet. What a difference! Kind of like the stuff we used to use on the front of our crew cut to make the hair stand up back in the early sixties before all hell broke loose. Well I made a grommet and seized it up onto a block and thimble. Here are the results. Making a grommet before was about a nine in difficulty this was about a three. Still gonna try manila.

http://albums.photopoint.com/j/View?u=1330151&a=9891760&p=42792280

[This message has been edited by T.KAMILA (edited 03-05-2001).]

Jonathan Kabak
03-05-2001, 11:40 AM
My Two Cents:

Making grommets or as some would say grummets is a pain in anything that is soft layed ie: cotton, spun dacron, layed dacron etc... cordage with more memory are much easier to work like Manila, polypro, roblon, etc...

It is very difficult to get high quality long fibre manila these days. If the fibers are short you get a frizzy piece of line that is comparativly weak against that on long fiber manila.

In making grommets out of dacron here is a little hint: don't over tighten the lay as you make them. Trying to force a hard twist into these lines will result in a figure of eight instead of a grommet.

When clamping on the seizing, stretch the grommet so that the chances of the grommet comming loose are minimized.

Finally when people come up to admire your handywork and gaze in awe at the fact that you have made a loop without a shortsplice smile and then teach them how to make one.

Fair winds and may your grommets end up in a loop not an eight

Jonathan

Jonathan Kabak
03-05-2001, 11:40 AM
My Two Cents:

Making grommets or as some would say grummets is a pain in anything that is soft layed ie: cotton, spun dacron, layed dacron etc... cordage with more memory are much easier to work like Manila, polypro, roblon, etc...

It is very difficult to get high quality long fibre manila these days. If the fibers are short you get a frizzy piece of line that is comparativly weak against that on long fiber manila.

In making grommets out of dacron here is a little hint: don't over tighten the lay as you make them. Trying to force a hard twist into these lines will result in a figure of eight instead of a grommet.

When clamping on the seizing, stretch the grommet so that the chances of the grommet comming loose are minimized.

Finally when people come up to admire your handywork and gaze in awe at the fact that you have made a loop without a shortsplice smile and then teach them how to make one.

Fair winds and may your grommets end up in a loop not an eight

Jonathan

Jonathan Kabak
03-05-2001, 11:40 AM
My Two Cents:

Making grommets or as some would say grummets is a pain in anything that is soft layed ie: cotton, spun dacron, layed dacron etc... cordage with more memory are much easier to work like Manila, polypro, roblon, etc...

It is very difficult to get high quality long fibre manila these days. If the fibers are short you get a frizzy piece of line that is comparativly weak against that on long fiber manila.

In making grommets out of dacron here is a little hint: don't over tighten the lay as you make them. Trying to force a hard twist into these lines will result in a figure of eight instead of a grommet.

When clamping on the seizing, stretch the grommet so that the chances of the grommet comming loose are minimized.

Finally when people come up to admire your handywork and gaze in awe at the fact that you have made a loop without a shortsplice smile and then teach them how to make one.

Fair winds and may your grommets end up in a loop not an eight

Jonathan

Todd Bradshaw
03-05-2001, 11:49 AM
That one looks pretty good to me. You mean "Southern Rose Butch Wax?" Now there's a flash from the past. Always loved the smell of that stuff. Manilla is very easy to work because it's stiff. Most of the stuff around here is in hardware stores and seems pretty coarse but you can trim or burn the fuzz off after it's done if you want. makes a pretty good "mast hoop" for small boats, too.

If you don't want to make them, almost any sailmaker can get you round thimbles in two or three sizes. Sailrite or Sailmaker's Supply could also get them for you. They are one of the few traditional bits of hardware still stocked by the big sailcloth manufacturers - I guess they haven't figured out that they aren't needed on Kevlar sails and discontinued them yet like most other traditional stuff.

Todd Bradshaw
03-05-2001, 11:49 AM
That one looks pretty good to me. You mean "Southern Rose Butch Wax?" Now there's a flash from the past. Always loved the smell of that stuff. Manilla is very easy to work because it's stiff. Most of the stuff around here is in hardware stores and seems pretty coarse but you can trim or burn the fuzz off after it's done if you want. makes a pretty good "mast hoop" for small boats, too.

If you don't want to make them, almost any sailmaker can get you round thimbles in two or three sizes. Sailrite or Sailmaker's Supply could also get them for you. They are one of the few traditional bits of hardware still stocked by the big sailcloth manufacturers - I guess they haven't figured out that they aren't needed on Kevlar sails and discontinued them yet like most other traditional stuff.

Todd Bradshaw
03-05-2001, 11:49 AM
That one looks pretty good to me. You mean "Southern Rose Butch Wax?" Now there's a flash from the past. Always loved the smell of that stuff. Manilla is very easy to work because it's stiff. Most of the stuff around here is in hardware stores and seems pretty coarse but you can trim or burn the fuzz off after it's done if you want. makes a pretty good "mast hoop" for small boats, too.

If you don't want to make them, almost any sailmaker can get you round thimbles in two or three sizes. Sailrite or Sailmaker's Supply could also get them for you. They are one of the few traditional bits of hardware still stocked by the big sailcloth manufacturers - I guess they haven't figured out that they aren't needed on Kevlar sails and discontinued them yet like most other traditional stuff.

TomRobb
03-05-2001, 02:47 PM
And then there's Dixie Peach. You can probably find it at any African-American barber shop that still does Processes.

TomRobb
03-05-2001, 02:47 PM
And then there's Dixie Peach. You can probably find it at any African-American barber shop that still does Processes.

TomRobb
03-05-2001, 02:47 PM
And then there's Dixie Peach. You can probably find it at any African-American barber shop that still does Processes.

Dave Hadfield
03-05-2001, 06:57 PM
That's a very nice-looking block.

I tried sailmakers, but the cost per thimble was high, so I used the copper pipe method, turning them out for pennies. I thought they may be a little too thin, but so far haven't seen any deformation.

Canada Cordage makes and sells manilla rope. I don't have their address, but http://www.redden-net.com/ropepg.html in Vancouver distributes it.

Dave

Dave Hadfield
03-05-2001, 06:57 PM
That's a very nice-looking block.

I tried sailmakers, but the cost per thimble was high, so I used the copper pipe method, turning them out for pennies. I thought they may be a little too thin, but so far haven't seen any deformation.

Canada Cordage makes and sells manilla rope. I don't have their address, but http://www.redden-net.com/ropepg.html in Vancouver distributes it.

Dave

Dave Hadfield
03-05-2001, 06:57 PM
That's a very nice-looking block.

I tried sailmakers, but the cost per thimble was high, so I used the copper pipe method, turning them out for pennies. I thought they may be a little too thin, but so far haven't seen any deformation.

Canada Cordage makes and sells manilla rope. I don't have their address, but http://www.redden-net.com/ropepg.html in Vancouver distributes it.

Dave

Mike Field
03-06-2001, 05:21 AM
Tom K, that's a nice-looking block you've got there.

Want a job?

Cheers, Mike.

Mike Field
03-06-2001, 05:21 AM
Tom K, that's a nice-looking block you've got there.

Want a job?

Cheers, Mike.

Mike Field
03-06-2001, 05:21 AM
Tom K, that's a nice-looking block you've got there.

Want a job?

Cheers, Mike.

T.KAMILA
03-06-2001, 07:04 AM
Mike I accept! you pay mileage for commuting donít you?

T.KAMILA
03-06-2001, 07:04 AM
Mike I accept! you pay mileage for commuting donít you?

T.KAMILA
03-06-2001, 07:04 AM
Mike I accept! you pay mileage for commuting donít you?

Mike Field
03-06-2001, 08:37 PM
Yep, but you understand that we work twelve-hour days here, so you'll probably need to have your own space-shuttle....

Cheers, mate.

Mike Field
03-06-2001, 08:37 PM
Yep, but you understand that we work twelve-hour days here, so you'll probably need to have your own space-shuttle....

Cheers, mate.

Mike Field
03-06-2001, 08:37 PM
Yep, but you understand that we work twelve-hour days here, so you'll probably need to have your own space-shuttle....

Cheers, mate.