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Bob Smalser
12-13-2003, 04:38 PM
Have a trashed chainsaw? Father-in-law is 84 and doesn’t see so well any more…don’t know what he put in the fuel tank but it sure scuffed the cylinder walls and piston to the point where the saw wouldn’t run any more.

A 20-year-old Stihl 026 Farm Boss worth maybe 250 bucks….not economically repairable at the saw shop. But I did find a NOS Stihl top end rebuild kit on Ebay for 50 bucks, a gasket set for 8 bucks and a service manual for another 8 bucks so for that amount it was worth doing. These rebuild kits are $135-150 retail from Stihl.

The new cylinder was the newer type with the compression release. Couldn’t find one on-line so I go see Howard at Belfair Power to see if he had an old trashed cylinder with one still in it I could recover. He didn’t, but pointed out that the new piston in my rebuild kit was no higher compression than the original, and that I could live without the release. He didn’t have the special bolt to plug the hole, so I hit the hardware store for a machine bolt and copper washer I could grind to fit…which I did.

http://pic3.picturetrail.com/VOL12/1104763/3279105/40202559.jpg

Dismantling the saw to expose the cylinder, I discover all the machine screws are Torx headed. I’ve got those for all except the long-reach Allen-style wrenches needed for the cylinder head-to-crankcase screws, but I discover a 9/64” Allen will break them loose without damage so I proceed. You can see the wrench reaching thru clearance holes in the cylinder fins to get to the machine screw in the pic above.

http://pic3.picturetrail.com/VOL12/1104763/3279105/40202546.jpg

The hose clamp on the rubber intake manifold is loosened and the cylinder head pulled from the saw…

http://pic3.picturetrail.com/VOL12/1104763/3279105/40202539.jpg

The shiny new piston is fitted to the connecting rod using the old spring clips…everything lubed with 90wt oil and swab…

http://pic3.picturetrail.com/VOL12/1104763/3279105/40202518.jpg

The rings aligned per the book and compressed with a hose clamp…a new crankcase gasket installed…

http://pic3.picturetrail.com/VOL12/1104763/3279105/40203510.jpg

And the new cylinder…also liberally lubed…tapped on, displacing the hose clamp which is dismantled and removed.

http://pic3.picturetrail.com/VOL12/1104763/3279105/40203527.jpg

The cylinder screws are replaced and torqued, and the spark plug is grounded to check for spark with a pull of the cord before installing the plug.

http://pic3.picturetrail.com/VOL12/1104763/3279105/40203536.jpg

The carb, which had been washed in carb cleaner and had been soaking in solvent, was reinstalled with it’s linkage and a new gasket…fresh fuel added after cleaning out the tank and filter…and she fires on the 3rd pull and both runs and idles well…I got lucky for a change.

http://pic3.picturetrail.com/VOL12/1104763/3279105/40202754.jpg

Shrouds, handles and covers reinstalled, and Pop has a working saw again….only this time…I’ll supply 5 gallons of correct fuel so he doesn’t run out.

$66.00 and about 2 hours…as opposed to over $300 at the saw shop.

[ 12-13-2003, 06:58 PM: Message edited by: Bob Smalser ]

Bob Smalser
12-13-2003, 04:38 PM
Have a trashed chainsaw? Father-in-law is 84 and doesn’t see so well any more…don’t know what he put in the fuel tank but it sure scuffed the cylinder walls and piston to the point where the saw wouldn’t run any more.

A 20-year-old Stihl 026 Farm Boss worth maybe 250 bucks….not economically repairable at the saw shop. But I did find a NOS Stihl top end rebuild kit on Ebay for 50 bucks, a gasket set for 8 bucks and a service manual for another 8 bucks so for that amount it was worth doing. These rebuild kits are $135-150 retail from Stihl.

The new cylinder was the newer type with the compression release. Couldn’t find one on-line so I go see Howard at Belfair Power to see if he had an old trashed cylinder with one still in it I could recover. He didn’t, but pointed out that the new piston in my rebuild kit was no higher compression than the original, and that I could live without the release. He didn’t have the special bolt to plug the hole, so I hit the hardware store for a machine bolt and copper washer I could grind to fit…which I did.

http://pic3.picturetrail.com/VOL12/1104763/3279105/40202559.jpg

Dismantling the saw to expose the cylinder, I discover all the machine screws are Torx headed. I’ve got those for all except the long-reach Allen-style wrenches needed for the cylinder head-to-crankcase screws, but I discover a 9/64” Allen will break them loose without damage so I proceed. You can see the wrench reaching thru clearance holes in the cylinder fins to get to the machine screw in the pic above.

http://pic3.picturetrail.com/VOL12/1104763/3279105/40202546.jpg

The hose clamp on the rubber intake manifold is loosened and the cylinder head pulled from the saw…

http://pic3.picturetrail.com/VOL12/1104763/3279105/40202539.jpg

The shiny new piston is fitted to the connecting rod using the old spring clips…everything lubed with 90wt oil and swab…

http://pic3.picturetrail.com/VOL12/1104763/3279105/40202518.jpg

The rings aligned per the book and compressed with a hose clamp…a new crankcase gasket installed…

http://pic3.picturetrail.com/VOL12/1104763/3279105/40203510.jpg

And the new cylinder…also liberally lubed…tapped on, displacing the hose clamp which is dismantled and removed.

http://pic3.picturetrail.com/VOL12/1104763/3279105/40203527.jpg

The cylinder screws are replaced and torqued, and the spark plug is grounded to check for spark with a pull of the cord before installing the plug.

http://pic3.picturetrail.com/VOL12/1104763/3279105/40203536.jpg

The carb, which had been washed in carb cleaner and had been soaking in solvent, was reinstalled with it’s linkage and a new gasket…fresh fuel added after cleaning out the tank and filter…and she fires on the 3rd pull and both runs and idles well…I got lucky for a change.

http://pic3.picturetrail.com/VOL12/1104763/3279105/40202754.jpg

Shrouds, handles and covers reinstalled, and Pop has a working saw again….only this time…I’ll supply 5 gallons of correct fuel so he doesn’t run out.

$66.00 and about 2 hours…as opposed to over $300 at the saw shop.

[ 12-13-2003, 06:58 PM: Message edited by: Bob Smalser ]

Bob Smalser
12-13-2003, 04:38 PM
Have a trashed chainsaw? Father-in-law is 84 and doesn’t see so well any more…don’t know what he put in the fuel tank but it sure scuffed the cylinder walls and piston to the point where the saw wouldn’t run any more.

A 20-year-old Stihl 026 Farm Boss worth maybe 250 bucks….not economically repairable at the saw shop. But I did find a NOS Stihl top end rebuild kit on Ebay for 50 bucks, a gasket set for 8 bucks and a service manual for another 8 bucks so for that amount it was worth doing. These rebuild kits are $135-150 retail from Stihl.

The new cylinder was the newer type with the compression release. Couldn’t find one on-line so I go see Howard at Belfair Power to see if he had an old trashed cylinder with one still in it I could recover. He didn’t, but pointed out that the new piston in my rebuild kit was no higher compression than the original, and that I could live without the release. He didn’t have the special bolt to plug the hole, so I hit the hardware store for a machine bolt and copper washer I could grind to fit…which I did.

http://pic3.picturetrail.com/VOL12/1104763/3279105/40202559.jpg

Dismantling the saw to expose the cylinder, I discover all the machine screws are Torx headed. I’ve got those for all except the long-reach Allen-style wrenches needed for the cylinder head-to-crankcase screws, but I discover a 9/64” Allen will break them loose without damage so I proceed. You can see the wrench reaching thru clearance holes in the cylinder fins to get to the machine screw in the pic above.

http://pic3.picturetrail.com/VOL12/1104763/3279105/40202546.jpg

The hose clamp on the rubber intake manifold is loosened and the cylinder head pulled from the saw…

http://pic3.picturetrail.com/VOL12/1104763/3279105/40202539.jpg

The shiny new piston is fitted to the connecting rod using the old spring clips…everything lubed with 90wt oil and swab…

http://pic3.picturetrail.com/VOL12/1104763/3279105/40202518.jpg

The rings aligned per the book and compressed with a hose clamp…a new crankcase gasket installed…

http://pic3.picturetrail.com/VOL12/1104763/3279105/40203510.jpg

And the new cylinder…also liberally lubed…tapped on, displacing the hose clamp which is dismantled and removed.

http://pic3.picturetrail.com/VOL12/1104763/3279105/40203527.jpg

The cylinder screws are replaced and torqued, and the spark plug is grounded to check for spark with a pull of the cord before installing the plug.

http://pic3.picturetrail.com/VOL12/1104763/3279105/40203536.jpg

The carb, which had been washed in carb cleaner and had been soaking in solvent, was reinstalled with it’s linkage and a new gasket…fresh fuel added after cleaning out the tank and filter…and she fires on the 3rd pull and both runs and idles well…I got lucky for a change.

http://pic3.picturetrail.com/VOL12/1104763/3279105/40202754.jpg

Shrouds, handles and covers reinstalled, and Pop has a working saw again….only this time…I’ll supply 5 gallons of correct fuel so he doesn’t run out.

$66.00 and about 2 hours…as opposed to over $300 at the saw shop.

[ 12-13-2003, 06:58 PM: Message edited by: Bob Smalser ]

Jack Heinlen
12-13-2003, 06:09 PM
:D

Those are good saws. Now, what to do with a Homelite that encountered steel when sawing up an old trunk for the fire? It, I think, just needs a new chain. It's badly chewed and jambed in the bar. The saw's such a POS that I almost hate to put anything into it.

Shoulda spent twice the original money and bought a Stihl or a Husky, then I'd have something worthy of some work. smile.gif

Jack Heinlen
12-13-2003, 06:09 PM
:D

Those are good saws. Now, what to do with a Homelite that encountered steel when sawing up an old trunk for the fire? It, I think, just needs a new chain. It's badly chewed and jambed in the bar. The saw's such a POS that I almost hate to put anything into it.

Shoulda spent twice the original money and bought a Stihl or a Husky, then I'd have something worthy of some work. smile.gif

Jack Heinlen
12-13-2003, 06:09 PM
:D

Those are good saws. Now, what to do with a Homelite that encountered steel when sawing up an old trunk for the fire? It, I think, just needs a new chain. It's badly chewed and jambed in the bar. The saw's such a POS that I almost hate to put anything into it.

Shoulda spent twice the original money and bought a Stihl or a Husky, then I'd have something worthy of some work. smile.gif

Bob Smalser
12-13-2003, 06:56 PM
It's badly chewed and jambed in the bar Baileys-online.com sells bars and chain so cheap that those aren't worth a whole lot of rehab.

Just count your links and note the pitch so's ya order the correct one. It's your sproket that determines the pitch...any bar that can be made to fit will work - and a little drilling and grinding can usually make that happen for a sawbar no longer made.

Bob Smalser
12-13-2003, 06:56 PM
It's badly chewed and jambed in the bar Baileys-online.com sells bars and chain so cheap that those aren't worth a whole lot of rehab.

Just count your links and note the pitch so's ya order the correct one. It's your sproket that determines the pitch...any bar that can be made to fit will work - and a little drilling and grinding can usually make that happen for a sawbar no longer made.

Bob Smalser
12-13-2003, 06:56 PM
It's badly chewed and jambed in the bar Baileys-online.com sells bars and chain so cheap that those aren't worth a whole lot of rehab.

Just count your links and note the pitch so's ya order the correct one. It's your sproket that determines the pitch...any bar that can be made to fit will work - and a little drilling and grinding can usually make that happen for a sawbar no longer made.

imported_Daniel
12-13-2003, 07:24 PM
Bob- you da bomb! Is there much you can't do? I just love reading your posts, thanks.

imported_Daniel
12-13-2003, 07:24 PM
Bob- you da bomb! Is there much you can't do? I just love reading your posts, thanks.

imported_Daniel
12-13-2003, 07:24 PM
Bob- you da bomb! Is there much you can't do? I just love reading your posts, thanks.

Jack Heinlen
12-13-2003, 07:29 PM
Thanks Bob, I'll have a look. The saw ran okay when I fubared it, so a new chain/bar will probably make it run again. And I have some dying birches hovering over my roof that really need to come down.

It's not a bad saw, has alway done its job. Even if it is a real POS. Homelite tongue.gif . Chinese crap.

Jack Heinlen
12-13-2003, 07:29 PM
Thanks Bob, I'll have a look. The saw ran okay when I fubared it, so a new chain/bar will probably make it run again. And I have some dying birches hovering over my roof that really need to come down.

It's not a bad saw, has alway done its job. Even if it is a real POS. Homelite tongue.gif . Chinese crap.

Jack Heinlen
12-13-2003, 07:29 PM
Thanks Bob, I'll have a look. The saw ran okay when I fubared it, so a new chain/bar will probably make it run again. And I have some dying birches hovering over my roof that really need to come down.

It's not a bad saw, has alway done its job. Even if it is a real POS. Homelite tongue.gif . Chinese crap.

Bob Smalser
12-13-2003, 07:35 PM
By prying the chainslot out or hammering it in as needed...and dressing the chain-bar faying surface by drawfiling, you may be able to save that bar. Even it it's tight...lots of bar oil and running the saw a while will wear the chain and bar in real fast.

And this 1959 Homelite now relegated to winch duty I rehabbed last week for that sawyer job is hardly Chinese junk and was state-of-the-art in it's day...I have two modern Stihl's and an Echo, and this old girl is still the fastest-starting:

http://pic3.picturetrail.com/VOL12/1104763/2597650/39312713.jpg

[ 12-13-2003, 07:38 PM: Message edited by: Bob Smalser ]

Bob Smalser
12-13-2003, 07:35 PM
By prying the chainslot out or hammering it in as needed...and dressing the chain-bar faying surface by drawfiling, you may be able to save that bar. Even it it's tight...lots of bar oil and running the saw a while will wear the chain and bar in real fast.

And this 1959 Homelite now relegated to winch duty I rehabbed last week for that sawyer job is hardly Chinese junk and was state-of-the-art in it's day...I have two modern Stihl's and an Echo, and this old girl is still the fastest-starting:

http://pic3.picturetrail.com/VOL12/1104763/2597650/39312713.jpg

[ 12-13-2003, 07:38 PM: Message edited by: Bob Smalser ]

Bob Smalser
12-13-2003, 07:35 PM
By prying the chainslot out or hammering it in as needed...and dressing the chain-bar faying surface by drawfiling, you may be able to save that bar. Even it it's tight...lots of bar oil and running the saw a while will wear the chain and bar in real fast.

And this 1959 Homelite now relegated to winch duty I rehabbed last week for that sawyer job is hardly Chinese junk and was state-of-the-art in it's day...I have two modern Stihl's and an Echo, and this old girl is still the fastest-starting:

http://pic3.picturetrail.com/VOL12/1104763/2597650/39312713.jpg

[ 12-13-2003, 07:38 PM: Message edited by: Bob Smalser ]

Northernguy59
12-13-2003, 10:43 PM
How do I thin bar oil ?........ it was 32 below yesterday. I know I should have winter grade bar oil but I was just wondering.

Thanks

Northernguy59
12-13-2003, 10:43 PM
How do I thin bar oil ?........ it was 32 below yesterday. I know I should have winter grade bar oil but I was just wondering.

Thanks

Northernguy59
12-13-2003, 10:43 PM
How do I thin bar oil ?........ it was 32 below yesterday. I know I should have winter grade bar oil but I was just wondering.

Thanks

Mrleft8
12-13-2003, 11:06 PM
Originally posted by Donn:
Alcohol.For the operator, or the oil?

Mrleft8
12-13-2003, 11:06 PM
Originally posted by Donn:
Alcohol.For the operator, or the oil?

Mrleft8
12-13-2003, 11:06 PM
Originally posted by Donn:
Alcohol.For the operator, or the oil?

jwaldin
12-14-2003, 10:13 AM
kerosen

jwaldin
12-14-2003, 10:13 AM
kerosen

jwaldin
12-14-2003, 10:13 AM
kerosen

Bob Smalser
12-14-2003, 11:30 AM
How do I thin bar oil ?........ Anything you have on hand that will work....mineral spirits, diesel, kerosene...about anything except gasoline or something with a real low flash point.

And most saws are set up at the factory to provide too little oil...if your saw isn't using a tank of oil per tank of gas, then adjust the oiling orfice if possible...makes your bars and tips last a whole lot longer.

Bob Smalser
12-14-2003, 11:30 AM
How do I thin bar oil ?........ Anything you have on hand that will work....mineral spirits, diesel, kerosene...about anything except gasoline or something with a real low flash point.

And most saws are set up at the factory to provide too little oil...if your saw isn't using a tank of oil per tank of gas, then adjust the oiling orfice if possible...makes your bars and tips last a whole lot longer.

Bob Smalser
12-14-2003, 11:30 AM
How do I thin bar oil ?........ Anything you have on hand that will work....mineral spirits, diesel, kerosene...about anything except gasoline or something with a real low flash point.

And most saws are set up at the factory to provide too little oil...if your saw isn't using a tank of oil per tank of gas, then adjust the oiling orfice if possible...makes your bars and tips last a whole lot longer.

Caledonia
12-25-2003, 04:41 PM
speaking of saws, anyone know where I can find a chain brake/sprocket cover assembly for an old Husqvarna 61 Rancher. Mine has the old metal hand guard. It seems those are now out of production. Only problem is the plastic version isn't compatible with the clearance from the muffler on my model, and this would lead me to an unnecessary muffler replacement. Anybody got one of these gathering dust somewhere?

Caledonia
12-25-2003, 04:41 PM
speaking of saws, anyone know where I can find a chain brake/sprocket cover assembly for an old Husqvarna 61 Rancher. Mine has the old metal hand guard. It seems those are now out of production. Only problem is the plastic version isn't compatible with the clearance from the muffler on my model, and this would lead me to an unnecessary muffler replacement. Anybody got one of these gathering dust somewhere?

Caledonia
12-25-2003, 04:41 PM
speaking of saws, anyone know where I can find a chain brake/sprocket cover assembly for an old Husqvarna 61 Rancher. Mine has the old metal hand guard. It seems those are now out of production. Only problem is the plastic version isn't compatible with the clearance from the muffler on my model, and this would lead me to an unnecessary muffler replacement. Anybody got one of these gathering dust somewhere?

Bob Smalser
12-26-2003, 12:42 PM
http://www.houseyardgarden.com/p57-20538-new-chainsaw-husqvarna-rancher-chain-saw.html

http://www.jackssmallengines.com/husqp_index.html

Bob Smalser
12-26-2003, 12:42 PM
http://www.houseyardgarden.com/p57-20538-new-chainsaw-husqvarna-rancher-chain-saw.html

http://www.jackssmallengines.com/husqp_index.html

Bob Smalser
12-26-2003, 12:42 PM
http://www.houseyardgarden.com/p57-20538-new-chainsaw-husqvarna-rancher-chain-saw.html

http://www.jackssmallengines.com/husqp_index.html

TomFF
01-16-2004, 10:32 PM
I pulled my old Echo 550 out from under my workbench. I tried using it twice last summer and decided I needed to get a new saw. But i read this post and got inspired. Wouldn't you know it fixed the darn thing after a discussion with a guy at the parts store. All I need to do now is sharpen the chain.

Thanks guys

TomFF
01-16-2004, 10:32 PM
I pulled my old Echo 550 out from under my workbench. I tried using it twice last summer and decided I needed to get a new saw. But i read this post and got inspired. Wouldn't you know it fixed the darn thing after a discussion with a guy at the parts store. All I need to do now is sharpen the chain.

Thanks guys

TomFF
01-16-2004, 10:32 PM
I pulled my old Echo 550 out from under my workbench. I tried using it twice last summer and decided I needed to get a new saw. But i read this post and got inspired. Wouldn't you know it fixed the darn thing after a discussion with a guy at the parts store. All I need to do now is sharpen the chain.

Thanks guys

Wild Wassa
01-16-2004, 11:32 PM
Originally posted by TomFF:
"All I need to do now is sharpen the chain."

The cost of a new chain vrs the cost of the sharpening gizmo and your time to do the job correctly, does not compare with buying a new chain. As a chainsaw operator for a contractor here in Canberra, (a couple of days a week I work) dropping trees and lopping limbs, we don't muck around with the chains, we just replace them. A new chain is much safer. I would not work for these guys if I thought I was using flogged chains. Sometimes we change chains twice a day.

We use Stihls, and they are just as bad as any other brand. They clog heaps if you keep the oil up to them. We mostly cut dead stuff, well seasoned Aussie hardwoods.

Warren.

ps, In Western Australia few days ago, a guy was cut in half when a 1200kg circular saw blade broke loose.

He was in the cab of a backhoe when it happened. The blade ran across a paddock, and got him. It sawed the cab of the backhoe in half, then the blade ran down the road peeling open a mini van, like a can opener, just missing the driver by inches. Perhaps Dingo has writen about this. It sure was a spooky accident.

[ 01-17-2004, 12:07 AM: Message edited by: Wild Wassa ]

Wild Wassa
01-16-2004, 11:32 PM
Originally posted by TomFF:
"All I need to do now is sharpen the chain."

The cost of a new chain vrs the cost of the sharpening gizmo and your time to do the job correctly, does not compare with buying a new chain. As a chainsaw operator for a contractor here in Canberra, (a couple of days a week I work) dropping trees and lopping limbs, we don't muck around with the chains, we just replace them. A new chain is much safer. I would not work for these guys if I thought I was using flogged chains. Sometimes we change chains twice a day.

We use Stihls, and they are just as bad as any other brand. They clog heaps if you keep the oil up to them. We mostly cut dead stuff, well seasoned Aussie hardwoods.

Warren.

ps, In Western Australia few days ago, a guy was cut in half when a 1200kg circular saw blade broke loose.

He was in the cab of a backhoe when it happened. The blade ran across a paddock, and got him. It sawed the cab of the backhoe in half, then the blade ran down the road peeling open a mini van, like a can opener, just missing the driver by inches. Perhaps Dingo has writen about this. It sure was a spooky accident.

[ 01-17-2004, 12:07 AM: Message edited by: Wild Wassa ]

Wild Wassa
01-16-2004, 11:32 PM
Originally posted by TomFF:
"All I need to do now is sharpen the chain."

The cost of a new chain vrs the cost of the sharpening gizmo and your time to do the job correctly, does not compare with buying a new chain. As a chainsaw operator for a contractor here in Canberra, (a couple of days a week I work) dropping trees and lopping limbs, we don't muck around with the chains, we just replace them. A new chain is much safer. I would not work for these guys if I thought I was using flogged chains. Sometimes we change chains twice a day.

We use Stihls, and they are just as bad as any other brand. They clog heaps if you keep the oil up to them. We mostly cut dead stuff, well seasoned Aussie hardwoods.

Warren.

ps, In Western Australia few days ago, a guy was cut in half when a 1200kg circular saw blade broke loose.

He was in the cab of a backhoe when it happened. The blade ran across a paddock, and got him. It sawed the cab of the backhoe in half, then the blade ran down the road peeling open a mini van, like a can opener, just missing the driver by inches. Perhaps Dingo has writen about this. It sure was a spooky accident.

[ 01-17-2004, 12:07 AM: Message edited by: Wild Wassa ]

Ken Hutchins
01-17-2004, 05:26 AM
ROTFLOL, you don't sharpen the chains? :eek: Your chain supplier is laughing all the way to the bank. :D Saw chain is made with the intention of it being sharpened, in fact Oregon chain has lines on the top of the teeth showing the limit of how far they can be sharpened and still be safe. No expensive equipment is needed, just 2 files.

Ken Hutchins
01-17-2004, 05:26 AM
ROTFLOL, you don't sharpen the chains? :eek: Your chain supplier is laughing all the way to the bank. :D Saw chain is made with the intention of it being sharpened, in fact Oregon chain has lines on the top of the teeth showing the limit of how far they can be sharpened and still be safe. No expensive equipment is needed, just 2 files.

Ken Hutchins
01-17-2004, 05:26 AM
ROTFLOL, you don't sharpen the chains? :eek: Your chain supplier is laughing all the way to the bank. :D Saw chain is made with the intention of it being sharpened, in fact Oregon chain has lines on the top of the teeth showing the limit of how far they can be sharpened and still be safe. No expensive equipment is needed, just 2 files.

Bob Smalser
01-17-2004, 11:24 AM
Most of my faller friends are fussy and touch their chains up...even brand new ones...with files several times a day.

As I mostly just buck in support of the mill, the chainsaws not being my primary tool, I'm not as fussy and grind them....a practice that makes my professional faller friends cringe...but their saws don't dig in the soil as much as my saws do, eh?

Those are 12v grinders below...a vise mounted on the front truck bumper next to the battery makes short work of it.

Just go light...as turning the cutting edge blue ruins it.

I use two grinding setups...one for the small-pitch 12" Echo one-handed arborist saw and the other for the big 36" Stihl.

http://pic3.picturetrail.com/VOL12/1104763/3075040/43083278.jpg

Baileys sell me replacement Oregon chains for 7 bucks for the little, 45-link saw and 15 bucks for the big, 105-link saw.

Most logging and arborist operations have a spinner and buy their chain from Baileys by the 500' roll.

[ 01-17-2004, 08:48 PM: Message edited by: Bob Smalser ]

Bob Smalser
01-17-2004, 11:24 AM
Most of my faller friends are fussy and touch their chains up...even brand new ones...with files several times a day.

As I mostly just buck in support of the mill, the chainsaws not being my primary tool, I'm not as fussy and grind them....a practice that makes my professional faller friends cringe...but their saws don't dig in the soil as much as my saws do, eh?

Those are 12v grinders below...a vise mounted on the front truck bumper next to the battery makes short work of it.

Just go light...as turning the cutting edge blue ruins it.

I use two grinding setups...one for the small-pitch 12" Echo one-handed arborist saw and the other for the big 36" Stihl.

http://pic3.picturetrail.com/VOL12/1104763/3075040/43083278.jpg

Baileys sell me replacement Oregon chains for 7 bucks for the little, 45-link saw and 15 bucks for the big, 105-link saw.

Most logging and arborist operations have a spinner and buy their chain from Baileys by the 500' roll.

[ 01-17-2004, 08:48 PM: Message edited by: Bob Smalser ]

Bob Smalser
01-17-2004, 11:24 AM
Most of my faller friends are fussy and touch their chains up...even brand new ones...with files several times a day.

As I mostly just buck in support of the mill, the chainsaws not being my primary tool, I'm not as fussy and grind them....a practice that makes my professional faller friends cringe...but their saws don't dig in the soil as much as my saws do, eh?

Those are 12v grinders below...a vise mounted on the front truck bumper next to the battery makes short work of it.

Just go light...as turning the cutting edge blue ruins it.

I use two grinding setups...one for the small-pitch 12" Echo one-handed arborist saw and the other for the big 36" Stihl.

http://pic3.picturetrail.com/VOL12/1104763/3075040/43083278.jpg

Baileys sell me replacement Oregon chains for 7 bucks for the little, 45-link saw and 15 bucks for the big, 105-link saw.

Most logging and arborist operations have a spinner and buy their chain from Baileys by the 500' roll.

[ 01-17-2004, 08:48 PM: Message edited by: Bob Smalser ]

imported_Steven Bauer
01-17-2004, 03:33 PM
I just came in from cutting some wood for the stove with my new Husqvarna 316 electric chainsaw.
I love it! Lots of power, no smoke, less noise. I got it last week and when I first tried it out it wouldn't cut at all. :( It just sat on top of the wood and started to smoke. Not what I expected from a brand new saw. Then I looked closely at the blade and saw that the blade was mounted backwards! That explained my poor results. After turning the blade around it cuts like a champ. I'm on a 50' by 100' city lot and just use it for roughing out blanks for turning or cutting firewood to size for the woodstove in the gar...er boatshop. And of course I'll sharpen the blade when it needs it. Were you kidding us Warren? When I worked for my brother-in-law the tree expert I was just the ground man but he'd sharpen his sawblades several times a day. Only took a few minutes.

Steven

imported_Steven Bauer
01-17-2004, 03:33 PM
I just came in from cutting some wood for the stove with my new Husqvarna 316 electric chainsaw.
I love it! Lots of power, no smoke, less noise. I got it last week and when I first tried it out it wouldn't cut at all. :( It just sat on top of the wood and started to smoke. Not what I expected from a brand new saw. Then I looked closely at the blade and saw that the blade was mounted backwards! That explained my poor results. After turning the blade around it cuts like a champ. I'm on a 50' by 100' city lot and just use it for roughing out blanks for turning or cutting firewood to size for the woodstove in the gar...er boatshop. And of course I'll sharpen the blade when it needs it. Were you kidding us Warren? When I worked for my brother-in-law the tree expert I was just the ground man but he'd sharpen his sawblades several times a day. Only took a few minutes.

Steven

imported_Steven Bauer
01-17-2004, 03:33 PM
I just came in from cutting some wood for the stove with my new Husqvarna 316 electric chainsaw.
I love it! Lots of power, no smoke, less noise. I got it last week and when I first tried it out it wouldn't cut at all. :( It just sat on top of the wood and started to smoke. Not what I expected from a brand new saw. Then I looked closely at the blade and saw that the blade was mounted backwards! That explained my poor results. After turning the blade around it cuts like a champ. I'm on a 50' by 100' city lot and just use it for roughing out blanks for turning or cutting firewood to size for the woodstove in the gar...er boatshop. And of course I'll sharpen the blade when it needs it. Were you kidding us Warren? When I worked for my brother-in-law the tree expert I was just the ground man but he'd sharpen his sawblades several times a day. Only took a few minutes.

Steven

Dave Williams
01-17-2004, 07:24 PM
I give my chains a touch with a hand file every time I fill the tank; by hand and by eye. Then occasionally, or if I hit something bad, I regrind with a setup similar to what Bob shows above. My ex's Dad was a faller in the NW for 30 years and never got badly hurt which is a statement! Sure was an education working in the woods with him.

Just like any other cutting tool, keep them very sharp and you'll get better results and enjoy the work a lot more.

That's what I think.
Dave

Dave Williams
01-17-2004, 07:24 PM
I give my chains a touch with a hand file every time I fill the tank; by hand and by eye. Then occasionally, or if I hit something bad, I regrind with a setup similar to what Bob shows above. My ex's Dad was a faller in the NW for 30 years and never got badly hurt which is a statement! Sure was an education working in the woods with him.

Just like any other cutting tool, keep them very sharp and you'll get better results and enjoy the work a lot more.

That's what I think.
Dave

Dave Williams
01-17-2004, 07:24 PM
I give my chains a touch with a hand file every time I fill the tank; by hand and by eye. Then occasionally, or if I hit something bad, I regrind with a setup similar to what Bob shows above. My ex's Dad was a faller in the NW for 30 years and never got badly hurt which is a statement! Sure was an education working in the woods with him.

Just like any other cutting tool, keep them very sharp and you'll get better results and enjoy the work a lot more.

That's what I think.
Dave

capt jake
01-17-2004, 08:01 PM
I give my chains a touch with a hand file every time I fill the tank; by hand and by eye Yup, that's what I do as well. Only problem now is, I can't find me durned file (and I need it tonight!).

Glad to see you here again Dave!! smile.gif

capt jake
01-17-2004, 08:01 PM
I give my chains a touch with a hand file every time I fill the tank; by hand and by eye Yup, that's what I do as well. Only problem now is, I can't find me durned file (and I need it tonight!).

Glad to see you here again Dave!! smile.gif

capt jake
01-17-2004, 08:01 PM
I give my chains a touch with a hand file every time I fill the tank; by hand and by eye Yup, that's what I do as well. Only problem now is, I can't find me durned file (and I need it tonight!).

Glad to see you here again Dave!! smile.gif

Steve Redmond
01-27-2004, 06:03 PM
A 1200 kg circular saw blade? On the loose sawing backhoes in half?

Did it miss the blue ox?

Steve Redmond
01-27-2004, 06:03 PM
A 1200 kg circular saw blade? On the loose sawing backhoes in half?

Did it miss the blue ox?

Steve Redmond
01-27-2004, 06:03 PM
A 1200 kg circular saw blade? On the loose sawing backhoes in half?

Did it miss the blue ox?