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clancy
12-01-2000, 03:12 PM
Can anyone give me advice on which are the better handheld GPS units for marine use. I didn't want to use the word best and start a war of words.

clancy
12-01-2000, 03:12 PM
Can anyone give me advice on which are the better handheld GPS units for marine use. I didn't want to use the word best and start a war of words.

clancy
12-01-2000, 03:12 PM
Can anyone give me advice on which are the better handheld GPS units for marine use. I didn't want to use the word best and start a war of words.

Ian McColgin
12-01-2000, 03:50 PM
Mine's a Magellan of an older and larger handheld vintage and I have lots of friends with Garmins.

Here's my take - In handheld, too many bells and whistles make for unreadable clutter. You have charts anyway so you don't need them in the GPS

I prefer the Magellan because of the way I use it - I never program a route and follow it - rather I just pop in my next goto. This is faster if you have a full numeric key pad. I find it faster to get the latlon out of my coast pilot or off the chart than to wade through the GPS's memory list, trying to guess how I abbrevieated the R8 off Poponosset from another R8 . . .

If you are quick with scrolling pointer logic, then the smaller units like Garmin and little Magellans will work fine - especially if you put in all sorts of way points so you just have to pull them up off the list. It's not congenial for me but is for many.

Certainly within my experience of a bunch of models for these two brands, there's no difference in accuracy or speed of fix.

Wait just a little longer and get last year's model at a nice discount.

g'luck

Ian McColgin
12-01-2000, 03:50 PM
Mine's a Magellan of an older and larger handheld vintage and I have lots of friends with Garmins.

Here's my take - In handheld, too many bells and whistles make for unreadable clutter. You have charts anyway so you don't need them in the GPS

I prefer the Magellan because of the way I use it - I never program a route and follow it - rather I just pop in my next goto. This is faster if you have a full numeric key pad. I find it faster to get the latlon out of my coast pilot or off the chart than to wade through the GPS's memory list, trying to guess how I abbrevieated the R8 off Poponosset from another R8 . . .

If you are quick with scrolling pointer logic, then the smaller units like Garmin and little Magellans will work fine - especially if you put in all sorts of way points so you just have to pull them up off the list. It's not congenial for me but is for many.

Certainly within my experience of a bunch of models for these two brands, there's no difference in accuracy or speed of fix.

Wait just a little longer and get last year's model at a nice discount.

g'luck

Ian McColgin
12-01-2000, 03:50 PM
Mine's a Magellan of an older and larger handheld vintage and I have lots of friends with Garmins.

Here's my take - In handheld, too many bells and whistles make for unreadable clutter. You have charts anyway so you don't need them in the GPS

I prefer the Magellan because of the way I use it - I never program a route and follow it - rather I just pop in my next goto. This is faster if you have a full numeric key pad. I find it faster to get the latlon out of my coast pilot or off the chart than to wade through the GPS's memory list, trying to guess how I abbrevieated the R8 off Poponosset from another R8 . . .

If you are quick with scrolling pointer logic, then the smaller units like Garmin and little Magellans will work fine - especially if you put in all sorts of way points so you just have to pull them up off the list. It's not congenial for me but is for many.

Certainly within my experience of a bunch of models for these two brands, there's no difference in accuracy or speed of fix.

Wait just a little longer and get last year's model at a nice discount.

g'luck

Qweeqweg
12-01-2000, 06:12 PM
I use a Maggelan also. At 150 dollars it's great , alot of good features

Qweeqweg
12-01-2000, 06:12 PM
I use a Maggelan also. At 150 dollars it's great , alot of good features

Qweeqweg
12-01-2000, 06:12 PM
I use a Maggelan also. At 150 dollars it's great , alot of good features

Todd Bradshaw
12-01-2000, 06:31 PM
We've got two Magellans that we bought mainly for sea kayaking on Lake Superior, where fog tends to come in fast. They are small enough that they mount right on the spray skirt, in front of the paddler.
I know the whole world seems to be Garmin-oriented, but I liked the Magellans better, partly because the screen is above the key-pad. When you punch-in info, you aren't blocking the view of what is happening on the screen with your hand.
First we bought a GPS 315. For a few bucks more than their Blazer model, you get more features, waypoints etc. It's got a pretty fast learning curve and I found that the best way to learn to use it was to turn it on and take a walk, playing with the gizmos. It's a great little unit.

Later, I bought a Map 410. It's bigger, heavier, and uses more batteries, but has a built-in map and can be loaded with real nav-charts for specific areas. It has become one of my favorite toys.

As Ian said, you don't really have to have the chart stuff built-in, but it's really nice at times. When the conditions get less than ideal, I find it reassuring to be able to look down and see exactly where I am at a glance and relate it to visual landmarks to prove that the world is still spinning properly. It is possible to overload the screen with too much stuff, but doesn't take long to figure-out what you want showing and what you want to turn off. The manuals are really good as well.

I bought a mount for it and stick it on the dashboard when we're out on the road. After a while, you feel naked without it sitting there. There have been several occasions when we were driving in snow, fog or darkness where it was very handy to zoom-in on the map to see a preview of what the road was was going to do a quarter mile ahead. We even take the 315 iceboating (keeps us from lying about how fast we were really going).

We haven't had any problems with either unit and they seem pretty hard to drown.

T.E.B.



[This message has been edited by Todd Bradshaw (edited 12-01-2000).]

Todd Bradshaw
12-01-2000, 06:31 PM
We've got two Magellans that we bought mainly for sea kayaking on Lake Superior, where fog tends to come in fast. They are small enough that they mount right on the spray skirt, in front of the paddler.
I know the whole world seems to be Garmin-oriented, but I liked the Magellans better, partly because the screen is above the key-pad. When you punch-in info, you aren't blocking the view of what is happening on the screen with your hand.
First we bought a GPS 315. For a few bucks more than their Blazer model, you get more features, waypoints etc. It's got a pretty fast learning curve and I found that the best way to learn to use it was to turn it on and take a walk, playing with the gizmos. It's a great little unit.

Later, I bought a Map 410. It's bigger, heavier, and uses more batteries, but has a built-in map and can be loaded with real nav-charts for specific areas. It has become one of my favorite toys.

As Ian said, you don't really have to have the chart stuff built-in, but it's really nice at times. When the conditions get less than ideal, I find it reassuring to be able to look down and see exactly where I am at a glance and relate it to visual landmarks to prove that the world is still spinning properly. It is possible to overload the screen with too much stuff, but doesn't take long to figure-out what you want showing and what you want to turn off. The manuals are really good as well.

I bought a mount for it and stick it on the dashboard when we're out on the road. After a while, you feel naked without it sitting there. There have been several occasions when we were driving in snow, fog or darkness where it was very handy to zoom-in on the map to see a preview of what the road was was going to do a quarter mile ahead. We even take the 315 iceboating (keeps us from lying about how fast we were really going).

We haven't had any problems with either unit and they seem pretty hard to drown.

T.E.B.



[This message has been edited by Todd Bradshaw (edited 12-01-2000).]

Todd Bradshaw
12-01-2000, 06:31 PM
We've got two Magellans that we bought mainly for sea kayaking on Lake Superior, where fog tends to come in fast. They are small enough that they mount right on the spray skirt, in front of the paddler.
I know the whole world seems to be Garmin-oriented, but I liked the Magellans better, partly because the screen is above the key-pad. When you punch-in info, you aren't blocking the view of what is happening on the screen with your hand.
First we bought a GPS 315. For a few bucks more than their Blazer model, you get more features, waypoints etc. It's got a pretty fast learning curve and I found that the best way to learn to use it was to turn it on and take a walk, playing with the gizmos. It's a great little unit.

Later, I bought a Map 410. It's bigger, heavier, and uses more batteries, but has a built-in map and can be loaded with real nav-charts for specific areas. It has become one of my favorite toys.

As Ian said, you don't really have to have the chart stuff built-in, but it's really nice at times. When the conditions get less than ideal, I find it reassuring to be able to look down and see exactly where I am at a glance and relate it to visual landmarks to prove that the world is still spinning properly. It is possible to overload the screen with too much stuff, but doesn't take long to figure-out what you want showing and what you want to turn off. The manuals are really good as well.

I bought a mount for it and stick it on the dashboard when we're out on the road. After a while, you feel naked without it sitting there. There have been several occasions when we were driving in snow, fog or darkness where it was very handy to zoom-in on the map to see a preview of what the road was was going to do a quarter mile ahead. We even take the 315 iceboating (keeps us from lying about how fast we were really going).

We haven't had any problems with either unit and they seem pretty hard to drown.

T.E.B.



[This message has been edited by Todd Bradshaw (edited 12-01-2000).]

Kermit
12-01-2000, 07:21 PM
A friend took to sticking his GPS on his dashboard when the speedometer quit. Slick.

Kermit
12-01-2000, 07:21 PM
A friend took to sticking his GPS on his dashboard when the speedometer quit. Slick.

Kermit
12-01-2000, 07:21 PM
A friend took to sticking his GPS on his dashboard when the speedometer quit. Slick.

Mitch Larsen
12-01-2000, 08:34 PM
My Garmin Etrex-Just over 100 bucks was my choice when I needed a replacement speedo in the 77 Chevy. Uses AA's and plugs into the cigarette lighter. My favorite feature is the TRACKS feature which graphically displays the units movement over time. For example, a tough beat to windward looks like a Frankenstein scar. Fun and functional. Mitch

Mitch Larsen
12-01-2000, 08:34 PM
My Garmin Etrex-Just over 100 bucks was my choice when I needed a replacement speedo in the 77 Chevy. Uses AA's and plugs into the cigarette lighter. My favorite feature is the TRACKS feature which graphically displays the units movement over time. For example, a tough beat to windward looks like a Frankenstein scar. Fun and functional. Mitch

Mitch Larsen
12-01-2000, 08:34 PM
My Garmin Etrex-Just over 100 bucks was my choice when I needed a replacement speedo in the 77 Chevy. Uses AA's and plugs into the cigarette lighter. My favorite feature is the TRACKS feature which graphically displays the units movement over time. For example, a tough beat to windward looks like a Frankenstein scar. Fun and functional. Mitch

Dave Hadfield
12-02-2000, 08:52 AM
I spent 3 weeks this summer sailing along the shores of Georgian Bay and up to the North Channel. There are literally more rocks, islands and shoals than any reasonable human could count -- most unbuoyed. One small section is called The Thirty-Thousand Islands.
I used a new Garmin ETREX and was impressed. It doesn't have all the bells and whistles, but it tells you where you are, where you've been, your velocity, and allows you to put in waypoints to build a route. Also, it's dirt cheap, takes only 2 AA cells, is "waterproof" (I don't intend to test this), shockproof (I did test that), and is used one-handed. It also orients itself very quickly, and has a bright light.
For the price of many of the other types, you could buy 2 or 3 of the Etrex. I believe I got a very good value.
And I didn't hit any rocks.

Dave Hadfield
12-02-2000, 08:52 AM
I spent 3 weeks this summer sailing along the shores of Georgian Bay and up to the North Channel. There are literally more rocks, islands and shoals than any reasonable human could count -- most unbuoyed. One small section is called The Thirty-Thousand Islands.
I used a new Garmin ETREX and was impressed. It doesn't have all the bells and whistles, but it tells you where you are, where you've been, your velocity, and allows you to put in waypoints to build a route. Also, it's dirt cheap, takes only 2 AA cells, is "waterproof" (I don't intend to test this), shockproof (I did test that), and is used one-handed. It also orients itself very quickly, and has a bright light.
For the price of many of the other types, you could buy 2 or 3 of the Etrex. I believe I got a very good value.
And I didn't hit any rocks.

Dave Hadfield
12-02-2000, 08:52 AM
I spent 3 weeks this summer sailing along the shores of Georgian Bay and up to the North Channel. There are literally more rocks, islands and shoals than any reasonable human could count -- most unbuoyed. One small section is called The Thirty-Thousand Islands.
I used a new Garmin ETREX and was impressed. It doesn't have all the bells and whistles, but it tells you where you are, where you've been, your velocity, and allows you to put in waypoints to build a route. Also, it's dirt cheap, takes only 2 AA cells, is "waterproof" (I don't intend to test this), shockproof (I did test that), and is used one-handed. It also orients itself very quickly, and has a bright light.
For the price of many of the other types, you could buy 2 or 3 of the Etrex. I believe I got a very good value.
And I didn't hit any rocks.

NormMessinger
12-02-2000, 10:21 AM
I can't compare Magellen with Garmin since my experience is only with Garmin but there is no need to be detered from Garmin because the key pad is above the display. Hold one in your left hand and press the buttons with you left thumb. Or vis versa depending on what you need to do with your other hand.

--Norm

NormMessinger
12-02-2000, 10:21 AM
I can't compare Magellen with Garmin since my experience is only with Garmin but there is no need to be detered from Garmin because the key pad is above the display. Hold one in your left hand and press the buttons with you left thumb. Or vis versa depending on what you need to do with your other hand.

--Norm

NormMessinger
12-02-2000, 10:21 AM
I can't compare Magellen with Garmin since my experience is only with Garmin but there is no need to be detered from Garmin because the key pad is above the display. Hold one in your left hand and press the buttons with you left thumb. Or vis versa depending on what you need to do with your other hand.

--Norm

Scott Rosen
12-02-2000, 03:27 PM
I bought a Garmin GPS 45 several years ago, and I've been pleased. It's easy to use and the keypad is designed for one handed operation. I've found that to be useful in eight foot seas while my crew was tossing their breakfast over the rail.

Scott Rosen
12-02-2000, 03:27 PM
I bought a Garmin GPS 45 several years ago, and I've been pleased. It's easy to use and the keypad is designed for one handed operation. I've found that to be useful in eight foot seas while my crew was tossing their breakfast over the rail.

Scott Rosen
12-02-2000, 03:27 PM
I bought a Garmin GPS 45 several years ago, and I've been pleased. It's easy to use and the keypad is designed for one handed operation. I've found that to be useful in eight foot seas while my crew was tossing their breakfast over the rail.