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wscherf
04-02-2006, 12:52 PM
I have this fantasy that I will sew up some sails and do some canvaswork on a Sailrite sewing machine (that has not yet been purchased). The bride (of 40+ years) does some sewing on a 500 year old Sears portable.

So my question is: Would the Sailrite machine be suitable for her general purpose sewing or not? If the Sailrite would be as good (or hopefully even better) than the old dinosaur, I will launch a campaign to make the switch. Since even in the best of circumstances this will be a hard-fought battle, I don't want to start laying out strategy if the Sailrite would not be suitable.

Walt

wscherf
04-02-2006, 12:52 PM
I have this fantasy that I will sew up some sails and do some canvaswork on a Sailrite sewing machine (that has not yet been purchased). The bride (of 40+ years) does some sewing on a 500 year old Sears portable.

So my question is: Would the Sailrite machine be suitable for her general purpose sewing or not? If the Sailrite would be as good (or hopefully even better) than the old dinosaur, I will launch a campaign to make the switch. Since even in the best of circumstances this will be a hard-fought battle, I don't want to start laying out strategy if the Sailrite would not be suitable.

Walt

wscherf
04-02-2006, 12:52 PM
I have this fantasy that I will sew up some sails and do some canvaswork on a Sailrite sewing machine (that has not yet been purchased). The bride (of 40+ years) does some sewing on a 500 year old Sears portable.

So my question is: Would the Sailrite machine be suitable for her general purpose sewing or not? If the Sailrite would be as good (or hopefully even better) than the old dinosaur, I will launch a campaign to make the switch. Since even in the best of circumstances this will be a hard-fought battle, I don't want to start laying out strategy if the Sailrite would not be suitable.

Walt

Charlie Santi
04-02-2006, 02:59 PM
I thought you have have to do a lot of sewing to justify an $800+ machine, I was wrong. I just finished a 12'x12'x9' gazebo cover in blue sunbrela plus with no prolem sewing all the seams. I am now working on recoverving the seats for my Penn Yan Explorer. I used to use an old Sear home machine but now I use a Sailrite LSZ-1.
Charlie
P.S. I did not buy the machine it was a gift from my father-in-law.

Charlie Santi
04-02-2006, 02:59 PM
I thought you have have to do a lot of sewing to justify an $800+ machine, I was wrong. I just finished a 12'x12'x9' gazebo cover in blue sunbrela plus with no prolem sewing all the seams. I am now working on recoverving the seats for my Penn Yan Explorer. I used to use an old Sear home machine but now I use a Sailrite LSZ-1.
Charlie
P.S. I did not buy the machine it was a gift from my father-in-law.

Charlie Santi
04-02-2006, 02:59 PM
I thought you have have to do a lot of sewing to justify an $800+ machine, I was wrong. I just finished a 12'x12'x9' gazebo cover in blue sunbrela plus with no prolem sewing all the seams. I am now working on recoverving the seats for my Penn Yan Explorer. I used to use an old Sear home machine but now I use a Sailrite LSZ-1.
Charlie
P.S. I did not buy the machine it was a gift from my father-in-law.

Todd Bradshaw
04-02-2006, 03:30 PM
If you're looking for a machine that will sew a broad range of fabrics, from the lightest, tissue-paper-like spinnaker fabric up through just about any heavy marine canvas construction (or that triple-rolled hem on the cuff of a pair of blue jeans) you won't find a better selection than the Sailrite machines. What is equally important is that nobody ANYWHERE offers the combination of replacement parts and readily available adjust-it/fix-it knowledge for their machines that Sailrite does (even over the phone, when needed).

The best, high-tech, regular home machines don't have the kind of heavy sewing capabilities that the sailrite machines do and most of the attractive sounding, used industrial machines that folks will recommend don't have the versatility or easily located technical support and parts. I've had my Sailrite Sailmaker for more than 25 years now. It's made hundreds of sails, boat covers, dodgers, replaced major portions of a few hot-air balloons and done household jobs ranging from letting out my Harris Tweed sportcoat to make room for my middle-age expansion to building dog beds or anything else we needed. Counting the number of empty industrial thread cones sitting on the shelf, I've probably put somewhere in the neighborhood of 18-20 miles of thread through mine and it's still going strong. If there was a better general-purpose machine, I'd own it!

Todd Bradshaw
04-02-2006, 03:30 PM
If you're looking for a machine that will sew a broad range of fabrics, from the lightest, tissue-paper-like spinnaker fabric up through just about any heavy marine canvas construction (or that triple-rolled hem on the cuff of a pair of blue jeans) you won't find a better selection than the Sailrite machines. What is equally important is that nobody ANYWHERE offers the combination of replacement parts and readily available adjust-it/fix-it knowledge for their machines that Sailrite does (even over the phone, when needed).

The best, high-tech, regular home machines don't have the kind of heavy sewing capabilities that the sailrite machines do and most of the attractive sounding, used industrial machines that folks will recommend don't have the versatility or easily located technical support and parts. I've had my Sailrite Sailmaker for more than 25 years now. It's made hundreds of sails, boat covers, dodgers, replaced major portions of a few hot-air balloons and done household jobs ranging from letting out my Harris Tweed sportcoat to make room for my middle-age expansion to building dog beds or anything else we needed. Counting the number of empty industrial thread cones sitting on the shelf, I've probably put somewhere in the neighborhood of 18-20 miles of thread through mine and it's still going strong. If there was a better general-purpose machine, I'd own it!

Todd Bradshaw
04-02-2006, 03:30 PM
If you're looking for a machine that will sew a broad range of fabrics, from the lightest, tissue-paper-like spinnaker fabric up through just about any heavy marine canvas construction (or that triple-rolled hem on the cuff of a pair of blue jeans) you won't find a better selection than the Sailrite machines. What is equally important is that nobody ANYWHERE offers the combination of replacement parts and readily available adjust-it/fix-it knowledge for their machines that Sailrite does (even over the phone, when needed).

The best, high-tech, regular home machines don't have the kind of heavy sewing capabilities that the sailrite machines do and most of the attractive sounding, used industrial machines that folks will recommend don't have the versatility or easily located technical support and parts. I've had my Sailrite Sailmaker for more than 25 years now. It's made hundreds of sails, boat covers, dodgers, replaced major portions of a few hot-air balloons and done household jobs ranging from letting out my Harris Tweed sportcoat to make room for my middle-age expansion to building dog beds or anything else we needed. Counting the number of empty industrial thread cones sitting on the shelf, I've probably put somewhere in the neighborhood of 18-20 miles of thread through mine and it's still going strong. If there was a better general-purpose machine, I'd own it!

kc8pql
04-03-2006, 07:27 PM
I've had an LSZ-1 for about 10 years now. I've used it for upholstery, canvas work, making and repairing sails, fixing rips in my jeans and hemming my wife's skirts. It's been trouble free. All it really needs is a deeper throat, but then it wouldn't fit in the boat. ;)

kc8pql
04-03-2006, 07:27 PM
I've had an LSZ-1 for about 10 years now. I've used it for upholstery, canvas work, making and repairing sails, fixing rips in my jeans and hemming my wife's skirts. It's been trouble free. All it really needs is a deeper throat, but then it wouldn't fit in the boat. ;)

kc8pql
04-03-2006, 07:27 PM
I've had an LSZ-1 for about 10 years now. I've used it for upholstery, canvas work, making and repairing sails, fixing rips in my jeans and hemming my wife's skirts. It's been trouble free. All it really needs is a deeper throat, but then it wouldn't fit in the boat. ;)