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dmede
02-17-2006, 04:37 PM
A freind of mine is looking at buying a smallish chainsaw for general use around the house and to cut up large blocks of Oak into blanks he can use on his lathe.

He's considering Husqvarna saws but there's a lot of variety in their models, so I told him I'd ask you guys since I know a few of you were or are connected to the forestry buisness and might have some insight.

Thanks,
dave

dmede
02-17-2006, 04:37 PM
A freind of mine is looking at buying a smallish chainsaw for general use around the house and to cut up large blocks of Oak into blanks he can use on his lathe.

He's considering Husqvarna saws but there's a lot of variety in their models, so I told him I'd ask you guys since I know a few of you were or are connected to the forestry buisness and might have some insight.

Thanks,
dave

dmede
02-17-2006, 04:37 PM
A freind of mine is looking at buying a smallish chainsaw for general use around the house and to cut up large blocks of Oak into blanks he can use on his lathe.

He's considering Husqvarna saws but there's a lot of variety in their models, so I told him I'd ask you guys since I know a few of you were or are connected to the forestry buisness and might have some insight.

Thanks,
dave

Alan D. Hyde
02-17-2006, 04:43 PM
1. Stihl.

2. "Your majesty, there IS no second..."

Alan

Alan D. Hyde
02-17-2006, 04:43 PM
1. Stihl.

2. "Your majesty, there IS no second..."

Alan

Alan D. Hyde
02-17-2006, 04:43 PM
1. Stihl.

2. "Your majesty, there IS no second..."

Alan

Shortman
02-17-2006, 05:03 PM
I have a 16" Husky that is a very nice little saw. I'm not a logger or tree guy, but just as nice as the Stihl I had before

Shortman
02-17-2006, 05:03 PM
I have a 16" Husky that is a very nice little saw. I'm not a logger or tree guy, but just as nice as the Stihl I had before

Shortman
02-17-2006, 05:03 PM
I have a 16" Husky that is a very nice little saw. I'm not a logger or tree guy, but just as nice as the Stihl I had before

J P
02-17-2006, 05:46 PM
"... for general use around the house ..." and lathe blanks ... if he doesn't mind the electron tether maybe consider an electric saw. Nice not to deal with gas, exhaust, and noise. Of the several types of electrics we've used in our shop the Makita 16" electric is the prefered. The "in-line" motor style has a nicer feel and balance than the "side mounted" styles. Husky has a similar saw but they don't seem to last long. We've been through a few of them. Switches go out, brushes are not replaceable ... OTH, for heavier work we use a variety of gas Huskies that work fine and have proven reliable. I have one from the early 80's that still runs great.

J P
02-17-2006, 05:46 PM
"... for general use around the house ..." and lathe blanks ... if he doesn't mind the electron tether maybe consider an electric saw. Nice not to deal with gas, exhaust, and noise. Of the several types of electrics we've used in our shop the Makita 16" electric is the prefered. The "in-line" motor style has a nicer feel and balance than the "side mounted" styles. Husky has a similar saw but they don't seem to last long. We've been through a few of them. Switches go out, brushes are not replaceable ... OTH, for heavier work we use a variety of gas Huskies that work fine and have proven reliable. I have one from the early 80's that still runs great.

J P
02-17-2006, 05:46 PM
"... for general use around the house ..." and lathe blanks ... if he doesn't mind the electron tether maybe consider an electric saw. Nice not to deal with gas, exhaust, and noise. Of the several types of electrics we've used in our shop the Makita 16" electric is the prefered. The "in-line" motor style has a nicer feel and balance than the "side mounted" styles. Husky has a similar saw but they don't seem to last long. We've been through a few of them. Switches go out, brushes are not replaceable ... OTH, for heavier work we use a variety of gas Huskies that work fine and have proven reliable. I have one from the early 80's that still runs great.

Bob Smalser
02-17-2006, 08:31 PM
First thing is to find a good saw shop where they both sell and maintain them. No Big Boxes. Call your local logger, sawyer or arborist for recommendations, as there's some that cater mostly to homeowners just to rip them off. You want a shop not shocked and appalled when somebody brings one in that's been run over by a skidder. Buy your saw there, with a couple extra chains, a wrench, a couple files to fit your chain for touchups, and some 2-cycle oil formulated for high rpms.

Get a 14-incher for all around use. I have a 14" 026 Stihl, a 36" 046 Stihl with a hop up kit, and a 12" Echo arborist's saw similar to the one Donn shows, which I probably use the most because it'd always in the truck. Most of my faller friends prefer Husky, with a big Stihl in the truck as backup for big wood.

Stihl's are generally a tad heavier for the same HP as Husky, Echo does small saws best, and as they're all excellent saws, it's mostly a matter of what your saw shop does best.

Electric saws also work. In fact, I have a one from Sears around here somewhere that's been doing light duty since 1976 or so.

Bob Smalser
02-17-2006, 08:31 PM
First thing is to find a good saw shop where they both sell and maintain them. No Big Boxes. Call your local logger, sawyer or arborist for recommendations, as there's some that cater mostly to homeowners just to rip them off. You want a shop not shocked and appalled when somebody brings one in that's been run over by a skidder. Buy your saw there, with a couple extra chains, a wrench, a couple files to fit your chain for touchups, and some 2-cycle oil formulated for high rpms.

Get a 14-incher for all around use. I have a 14" 026 Stihl, a 36" 046 Stihl with a hop up kit, and a 12" Echo arborist's saw similar to the one Donn shows, which I probably use the most because it'd always in the truck. Most of my faller friends prefer Husky, with a big Stihl in the truck as backup for big wood.

Stihl's are generally a tad heavier for the same HP as Husky, Echo does small saws best, and as they're all excellent saws, it's mostly a matter of what your saw shop does best.

Electric saws also work. In fact, I have a one from Sears around here somewhere that's been doing light duty since 1976 or so.

Bob Smalser
02-17-2006, 08:31 PM
First thing is to find a good saw shop where they both sell and maintain them. No Big Boxes. Call your local logger, sawyer or arborist for recommendations, as there's some that cater mostly to homeowners just to rip them off. You want a shop not shocked and appalled when somebody brings one in that's been run over by a skidder. Buy your saw there, with a couple extra chains, a wrench, a couple files to fit your chain for touchups, and some 2-cycle oil formulated for high rpms.

Get a 14-incher for all around use. I have a 14" 026 Stihl, a 36" 046 Stihl with a hop up kit, and a 12" Echo arborist's saw similar to the one Donn shows, which I probably use the most because it'd always in the truck. Most of my faller friends prefer Husky, with a big Stihl in the truck as backup for big wood.

Stihl's are generally a tad heavier for the same HP as Husky, Echo does small saws best, and as they're all excellent saws, it's mostly a matter of what your saw shop does best.

Electric saws also work. In fact, I have a one from Sears around here somewhere that's been doing light duty since 1976 or so.

Ian Marchuk
02-17-2006, 09:52 PM
Stihl and Husqvarna make top of the line saws.
However in my experience Jonsered is the standard for the industry. I bought a 621 in 1973
and worked it hard ,buried in big cedar hour after hour cutting shake bolts.It has performed flawlessly since I bought it 32!!!! years ago. QUIET POWER is worth a lot.I use it often still, cutting 6-8 cords of firewood per year as well as doing custom tree removal.Problem with Stihl and especially Husky is noise. The husky gets its power from ballistic RPM....
The Jonsered is regarded by the wood hounds in our area as the best all round choice..
Whatever you do think industrial... anything else is bound to bugger up and disappoint. After the hair pulling is done you WILL think industrial.You pay more initially, but the saw will last forever.


Further, use only the absolute best 2-stroke oil you can buy. At 45 and 50 to one there is no margin for anything but the best.

Ian Marchuk
02-17-2006, 09:52 PM
Stihl and Husqvarna make top of the line saws.
However in my experience Jonsered is the standard for the industry. I bought a 621 in 1973
and worked it hard ,buried in big cedar hour after hour cutting shake bolts.It has performed flawlessly since I bought it 32!!!! years ago. QUIET POWER is worth a lot.I use it often still, cutting 6-8 cords of firewood per year as well as doing custom tree removal.Problem with Stihl and especially Husky is noise. The husky gets its power from ballistic RPM....
The Jonsered is regarded by the wood hounds in our area as the best all round choice..
Whatever you do think industrial... anything else is bound to bugger up and disappoint. After the hair pulling is done you WILL think industrial.You pay more initially, but the saw will last forever.


Further, use only the absolute best 2-stroke oil you can buy. At 45 and 50 to one there is no margin for anything but the best.

Ian Marchuk
02-17-2006, 09:52 PM
Stihl and Husqvarna make top of the line saws.
However in my experience Jonsered is the standard for the industry. I bought a 621 in 1973
and worked it hard ,buried in big cedar hour after hour cutting shake bolts.It has performed flawlessly since I bought it 32!!!! years ago. QUIET POWER is worth a lot.I use it often still, cutting 6-8 cords of firewood per year as well as doing custom tree removal.Problem with Stihl and especially Husky is noise. The husky gets its power from ballistic RPM....
The Jonsered is regarded by the wood hounds in our area as the best all round choice..
Whatever you do think industrial... anything else is bound to bugger up and disappoint. After the hair pulling is done you WILL think industrial.You pay more initially, but the saw will last forever.


Further, use only the absolute best 2-stroke oil you can buy. At 45 and 50 to one there is no margin for anything but the best.

Peter Malcolm Jardine
02-17-2006, 10:21 PM
Usually one of the local farm equipment people will sell and service either Stihl or Husqvarna...

If you're considering buying a 12 inch saw, and think you might have any other use other than noted for a chainsaw, get a 16 inch. That's still to small to use in the bush, but it will do most things in a pinch. The saws you'll run into are homeowner saws anyway, not pro quality. Up here, 600 Cdn will buy a reasonable saw for most folks, even a little less.

[ 02-17-2006, 10:23 PM: Message edited by: Peter Malcolm Jardine ]

Peter Malcolm Jardine
02-17-2006, 10:21 PM
Usually one of the local farm equipment people will sell and service either Stihl or Husqvarna...

If you're considering buying a 12 inch saw, and think you might have any other use other than noted for a chainsaw, get a 16 inch. That's still to small to use in the bush, but it will do most things in a pinch. The saws you'll run into are homeowner saws anyway, not pro quality. Up here, 600 Cdn will buy a reasonable saw for most folks, even a little less.

[ 02-17-2006, 10:23 PM: Message edited by: Peter Malcolm Jardine ]

Peter Malcolm Jardine
02-17-2006, 10:21 PM
Usually one of the local farm equipment people will sell and service either Stihl or Husqvarna...

If you're considering buying a 12 inch saw, and think you might have any other use other than noted for a chainsaw, get a 16 inch. That's still to small to use in the bush, but it will do most things in a pinch. The saws you'll run into are homeowner saws anyway, not pro quality. Up here, 600 Cdn will buy a reasonable saw for most folks, even a little less.

[ 02-17-2006, 10:23 PM: Message edited by: Peter Malcolm Jardine ]

Dave Hadfield
02-18-2006, 08:49 AM
Get a bigger saw than you need, and make it Stihl, Husquavarna or Jonsered. I've used a Husky to cut 4 cords a year, plus occasional slab-cutting use, for 20 years.

Amd make CERTAIN that you keep only fresh gas in it, or gas which has fuel stabilizer in it. I lost my treasured Husky 266 (1986) last year when snot condensing out of crappy modern gas choked up the fuel ports and leaned out the mixture when I was cutting full blast to remove a stump. Result -- an overheated saw with scored, wrecked cylinders that cost more to fix than replace.

And it's your choice, but I never lend my saw. Period. There's too much risk of a faulty oil/gas mix, or somebody putting the chain into the dirt. What I say is, "Nope, I won't lend it, but I'd be happy to come over to your place and cut up whatever you want."

Dave Hadfield
02-18-2006, 08:49 AM
Get a bigger saw than you need, and make it Stihl, Husquavarna or Jonsered. I've used a Husky to cut 4 cords a year, plus occasional slab-cutting use, for 20 years.

Amd make CERTAIN that you keep only fresh gas in it, or gas which has fuel stabilizer in it. I lost my treasured Husky 266 (1986) last year when snot condensing out of crappy modern gas choked up the fuel ports and leaned out the mixture when I was cutting full blast to remove a stump. Result -- an overheated saw with scored, wrecked cylinders that cost more to fix than replace.

And it's your choice, but I never lend my saw. Period. There's too much risk of a faulty oil/gas mix, or somebody putting the chain into the dirt. What I say is, "Nope, I won't lend it, but I'd be happy to come over to your place and cut up whatever you want."

Dave Hadfield
02-18-2006, 08:49 AM
Get a bigger saw than you need, and make it Stihl, Husquavarna or Jonsered. I've used a Husky to cut 4 cords a year, plus occasional slab-cutting use, for 20 years.

Amd make CERTAIN that you keep only fresh gas in it, or gas which has fuel stabilizer in it. I lost my treasured Husky 266 (1986) last year when snot condensing out of crappy modern gas choked up the fuel ports and leaned out the mixture when I was cutting full blast to remove a stump. Result -- an overheated saw with scored, wrecked cylinders that cost more to fix than replace.

And it's your choice, but I never lend my saw. Period. There's too much risk of a faulty oil/gas mix, or somebody putting the chain into the dirt. What I say is, "Nope, I won't lend it, but I'd be happy to come over to your place and cut up whatever you want."

Venchka
02-18-2006, 09:02 AM
Lisa gave me an 18" Stihl MS 250 for Christmas, 2004.

http://www.stihl.us/graphics/chainsaws/MS250.gif

I used it to wade through this after Hurricane Katrina...

http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid186/p70a205927ef78e2995d0088984598d42/f25293e2.jpg

Great saw and the gentleman who sold it to Lisa runs a full service shop. A good combination all around.

Wayne
In Texas. :D

Venchka
02-18-2006, 09:02 AM
Lisa gave me an 18" Stihl MS 250 for Christmas, 2004.

http://www.stihl.us/graphics/chainsaws/MS250.gif

I used it to wade through this after Hurricane Katrina...

http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid186/p70a205927ef78e2995d0088984598d42/f25293e2.jpg

Great saw and the gentleman who sold it to Lisa runs a full service shop. A good combination all around.

Wayne
In Texas. :D

Venchka
02-18-2006, 09:02 AM
Lisa gave me an 18" Stihl MS 250 for Christmas, 2004.

http://www.stihl.us/graphics/chainsaws/MS250.gif

I used it to wade through this after Hurricane Katrina...

http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid186/p70a205927ef78e2995d0088984598d42/f25293e2.jpg

Great saw and the gentleman who sold it to Lisa runs a full service shop. A good combination all around.

Wayne
In Texas. :D

hoss
02-18-2006, 09:49 AM
I cut a lot of wood. The trend for the big two (Husky and Stihl) is down in quality to a more consumer level. Kind of a race to the bottom (the same thing is happening in power tools) In my opinion the best deal to be found is Dolmar. Dolmar is very popular in Europe. Dolmar was bought a number of years ago by Makita who did nothing with them. They now are distibuted on their own and have gone back to their orange colour. I just bought a 54 cc Dolmar saw it was at least $200.00 less then the Stihl. I like it a lot so far, it's made in Germany and is a old time slower reving machine.

hoss
02-18-2006, 09:49 AM
I cut a lot of wood. The trend for the big two (Husky and Stihl) is down in quality to a more consumer level. Kind of a race to the bottom (the same thing is happening in power tools) In my opinion the best deal to be found is Dolmar. Dolmar is very popular in Europe. Dolmar was bought a number of years ago by Makita who did nothing with them. They now are distibuted on their own and have gone back to their orange colour. I just bought a 54 cc Dolmar saw it was at least $200.00 less then the Stihl. I like it a lot so far, it's made in Germany and is a old time slower reving machine.

hoss
02-18-2006, 09:49 AM
I cut a lot of wood. The trend for the big two (Husky and Stihl) is down in quality to a more consumer level. Kind of a race to the bottom (the same thing is happening in power tools) In my opinion the best deal to be found is Dolmar. Dolmar is very popular in Europe. Dolmar was bought a number of years ago by Makita who did nothing with them. They now are distibuted on their own and have gone back to their orange colour. I just bought a 54 cc Dolmar saw it was at least $200.00 less then the Stihl. I like it a lot so far, it's made in Germany and is a old time slower reving machine.

emichaels
02-18-2006, 04:14 PM
First off, as Smalser noted, find a repair shop close by. Most repair shops prefer to work on Stihl or Husky, they see more of them and parts are readily available. I have a friend who has worked in the woods of Maine, logging, for over 40 years, he has in his truck (4) Stihls, 2of which are for big wood, 1 is a trimmer, one is for pinches. The biggest mistake most part time users make is getting a saw with to little horsepower. So pay for a little more HP than you think you will need. As far as sharpening goes, it is NOT just a matter of drawing a round file thru the teeth every now and then. Order a back issue of Sawmill & Woodlot Managment (March 2005), there is a great article concerning sharpening chains. Most hardware stores with auto sharpeners do not do the whole job, and performance will suffer.
Its true that some of the Stihls and Huskys have smaller models geared towards the homeowner. When you buy it they will ask you if it is going to be used for a business or home use and it will affect the warrant. I know this because I just bought my wife a small Stihl so she can work in the woods with me when she wants to.

Eric

emichaels
02-18-2006, 04:14 PM
First off, as Smalser noted, find a repair shop close by. Most repair shops prefer to work on Stihl or Husky, they see more of them and parts are readily available. I have a friend who has worked in the woods of Maine, logging, for over 40 years, he has in his truck (4) Stihls, 2of which are for big wood, 1 is a trimmer, one is for pinches. The biggest mistake most part time users make is getting a saw with to little horsepower. So pay for a little more HP than you think you will need. As far as sharpening goes, it is NOT just a matter of drawing a round file thru the teeth every now and then. Order a back issue of Sawmill & Woodlot Managment (March 2005), there is a great article concerning sharpening chains. Most hardware stores with auto sharpeners do not do the whole job, and performance will suffer.
Its true that some of the Stihls and Huskys have smaller models geared towards the homeowner. When you buy it they will ask you if it is going to be used for a business or home use and it will affect the warrant. I know this because I just bought my wife a small Stihl so she can work in the woods with me when she wants to.

Eric

emichaels
02-18-2006, 04:14 PM
First off, as Smalser noted, find a repair shop close by. Most repair shops prefer to work on Stihl or Husky, they see more of them and parts are readily available. I have a friend who has worked in the woods of Maine, logging, for over 40 years, he has in his truck (4) Stihls, 2of which are for big wood, 1 is a trimmer, one is for pinches. The biggest mistake most part time users make is getting a saw with to little horsepower. So pay for a little more HP than you think you will need. As far as sharpening goes, it is NOT just a matter of drawing a round file thru the teeth every now and then. Order a back issue of Sawmill & Woodlot Managment (March 2005), there is a great article concerning sharpening chains. Most hardware stores with auto sharpeners do not do the whole job, and performance will suffer.
Its true that some of the Stihls and Huskys have smaller models geared towards the homeowner. When you buy it they will ask you if it is going to be used for a business or home use and it will affect the warrant. I know this because I just bought my wife a small Stihl so she can work in the woods with me when she wants to.

Eric

dmede
02-18-2006, 04:18 PM
Thanks, sounds like the Husky will be just fine then. I think he's ordering from a local tool supply shop where they both sell and maintain the tools they sell.

dmede
02-18-2006, 04:18 PM
Thanks, sounds like the Husky will be just fine then. I think he's ordering from a local tool supply shop where they both sell and maintain the tools they sell.

dmede
02-18-2006, 04:18 PM
Thanks, sounds like the Husky will be just fine then. I think he's ordering from a local tool supply shop where they both sell and maintain the tools they sell.

Alan D. Hyde
02-18-2006, 04:38 PM
Our family has all Stihls---

An 015 for light limbing and trimming

An MS 260 for firewood

An 041AVE for general farm and woods work (from 1975, still running strong...)

An 065 for bigger trees

Various cutter bars for these, all the way from 16 inches to 36 inches.

Alan

Alan D. Hyde
02-18-2006, 04:38 PM
Our family has all Stihls---

An 015 for light limbing and trimming

An MS 260 for firewood

An 041AVE for general farm and woods work (from 1975, still running strong...)

An 065 for bigger trees

Various cutter bars for these, all the way from 16 inches to 36 inches.

Alan

Alan D. Hyde
02-18-2006, 04:38 PM
Our family has all Stihls---

An 015 for light limbing and trimming

An MS 260 for firewood

An 041AVE for general farm and woods work (from 1975, still running strong...)

An 065 for bigger trees

Various cutter bars for these, all the way from 16 inches to 36 inches.

Alan

Bob Smalser
02-18-2006, 06:30 PM
http://pic3.picturetrail.com/VOL12/1104763/3075040/43083278.jpg

First thing to do is index the file in that brand new chain and memorize the angle. Take a couple photos if you have to. Learn that angle, and you can forego the PIA of jigs.

I grind my chains, as my saws are mostly used for bucking large, dirty logs on gravel. It's faster than filing. This shocks and appalls my faller friends who take great care using only files.

Don't take your chains to the saw shop if you can avoid it, as their angle grinders don't apply the proper tooth shape and waste a lot of it in the process.

Also buy a 3-dollar raker gage to check and correct height after your teeth are worn down by about a third.

http://pic3.picturetrail.com/VOL12/1104763/2597650/39312713.jpg

And one of the best GP saws ever made was the all-steel Homelite Zip from the 1950's, which show up regularly in running condition at auctions. Bring muscle, tho. ;)

Bob Smalser
02-18-2006, 06:30 PM
http://pic3.picturetrail.com/VOL12/1104763/3075040/43083278.jpg

First thing to do is index the file in that brand new chain and memorize the angle. Take a couple photos if you have to. Learn that angle, and you can forego the PIA of jigs.

I grind my chains, as my saws are mostly used for bucking large, dirty logs on gravel. It's faster than filing. This shocks and appalls my faller friends who take great care using only files.

Don't take your chains to the saw shop if you can avoid it, as their angle grinders don't apply the proper tooth shape and waste a lot of it in the process.

Also buy a 3-dollar raker gage to check and correct height after your teeth are worn down by about a third.

http://pic3.picturetrail.com/VOL12/1104763/2597650/39312713.jpg

And one of the best GP saws ever made was the all-steel Homelite Zip from the 1950's, which show up regularly in running condition at auctions. Bring muscle, tho. ;)

Bob Smalser
02-18-2006, 06:30 PM
http://pic3.picturetrail.com/VOL12/1104763/3075040/43083278.jpg

First thing to do is index the file in that brand new chain and memorize the angle. Take a couple photos if you have to. Learn that angle, and you can forego the PIA of jigs.

I grind my chains, as my saws are mostly used for bucking large, dirty logs on gravel. It's faster than filing. This shocks and appalls my faller friends who take great care using only files.

Don't take your chains to the saw shop if you can avoid it, as their angle grinders don't apply the proper tooth shape and waste a lot of it in the process.

Also buy a 3-dollar raker gage to check and correct height after your teeth are worn down by about a third.

http://pic3.picturetrail.com/VOL12/1104763/2597650/39312713.jpg

And one of the best GP saws ever made was the all-steel Homelite Zip from the 1950's, which show up regularly in running condition at auctions. Bring muscle, tho. ;)

Stari27
02-19-2006, 11:00 AM
Around here most of the Public Works and Parks departments use Stihls. I have had one for 12 years and love it. Initially I used to to make my dive at the lake- 1465 feet and approximately 1 tree per 10 feet. One caution to all. I had a Johnson back in the 70's and froze it one day cutting down an 18 " beech. It was 105 F and I used reguale mixture of fuel. The motor got so hot and fuel so think that there was no lubrication from the fuel mixture. If you have to work in that kind of heat add more oil to the mix.
PetrB

Stari27
02-19-2006, 11:00 AM
Around here most of the Public Works and Parks departments use Stihls. I have had one for 12 years and love it. Initially I used to to make my dive at the lake- 1465 feet and approximately 1 tree per 10 feet. One caution to all. I had a Johnson back in the 70's and froze it one day cutting down an 18 " beech. It was 105 F and I used reguale mixture of fuel. The motor got so hot and fuel so think that there was no lubrication from the fuel mixture. If you have to work in that kind of heat add more oil to the mix.
PetrB

Stari27
02-19-2006, 11:00 AM
Around here most of the Public Works and Parks departments use Stihls. I have had one for 12 years and love it. Initially I used to to make my dive at the lake- 1465 feet and approximately 1 tree per 10 feet. One caution to all. I had a Johnson back in the 70's and froze it one day cutting down an 18 " beech. It was 105 F and I used reguale mixture of fuel. The motor got so hot and fuel so think that there was no lubrication from the fuel mixture. If you have to work in that kind of heat add more oil to the mix.
PetrB

Ken Hutchins
02-19-2006, 11:28 AM
From what I've experienced with 2 cycle engines is that the high heat is not the actual problem. High heat days are usually high barometric pressure days, the higher air pressure has more air so less oil in the mix.
I've experienced melt downs of snowmobile engines on high pressure extremely low temperature days. If the mixture at the carburator is adjusted on a low pressure day it will be lean on a high pressure day. The same is true for adjusting near sea level then running the engine at higher elevations. The newer snowmobiles have computers and air pressure sensors to adjust accordingly. A few years ago it was necessary to adjust and/or change jets to run at different elevations. Of course this elevation / pressure issue also applies to outboards.

Ken Hutchins
02-19-2006, 11:28 AM
From what I've experienced with 2 cycle engines is that the high heat is not the actual problem. High heat days are usually high barometric pressure days, the higher air pressure has more air so less oil in the mix.
I've experienced melt downs of snowmobile engines on high pressure extremely low temperature days. If the mixture at the carburator is adjusted on a low pressure day it will be lean on a high pressure day. The same is true for adjusting near sea level then running the engine at higher elevations. The newer snowmobiles have computers and air pressure sensors to adjust accordingly. A few years ago it was necessary to adjust and/or change jets to run at different elevations. Of course this elevation / pressure issue also applies to outboards.

Ken Hutchins
02-19-2006, 11:28 AM
From what I've experienced with 2 cycle engines is that the high heat is not the actual problem. High heat days are usually high barometric pressure days, the higher air pressure has more air so less oil in the mix.
I've experienced melt downs of snowmobile engines on high pressure extremely low temperature days. If the mixture at the carburator is adjusted on a low pressure day it will be lean on a high pressure day. The same is true for adjusting near sea level then running the engine at higher elevations. The newer snowmobiles have computers and air pressure sensors to adjust accordingly. A few years ago it was necessary to adjust and/or change jets to run at different elevations. Of course this elevation / pressure issue also applies to outboards.

emichaels
02-19-2006, 11:44 AM
As Bob Smalser noted the angle of the tooth is critical. It is actually marked on the top of the tooth with a line etched in the chain. At least on good quality chains. Sharpening a chainsaw chain is almost always done wrong and incomletely by occasional users. It is definitely worth having a woodsman show you how to do it right. It is amazing how good a properly treated chain will cut. About a 1/3 better than the chain out of the box.

Eric

emichaels
02-19-2006, 11:44 AM
As Bob Smalser noted the angle of the tooth is critical. It is actually marked on the top of the tooth with a line etched in the chain. At least on good quality chains. Sharpening a chainsaw chain is almost always done wrong and incomletely by occasional users. It is definitely worth having a woodsman show you how to do it right. It is amazing how good a properly treated chain will cut. About a 1/3 better than the chain out of the box.

Eric

emichaels
02-19-2006, 11:44 AM
As Bob Smalser noted the angle of the tooth is critical. It is actually marked on the top of the tooth with a line etched in the chain. At least on good quality chains. Sharpening a chainsaw chain is almost always done wrong and incomletely by occasional users. It is definitely worth having a woodsman show you how to do it right. It is amazing how good a properly treated chain will cut. About a 1/3 better than the chain out of the box.

Eric

mike kelly
02-19-2006, 11:58 AM
I would consider stepping up a bit in power because you'll be making rip cuts to make bowl blanks.Tried to rip a piece of dried live oak one time with a 14" poulan, wouldn't cut it.Buy the best you can afford.you'll save money in the long run.
happy turning

mike kelly
02-19-2006, 11:58 AM
I would consider stepping up a bit in power because you'll be making rip cuts to make bowl blanks.Tried to rip a piece of dried live oak one time with a 14" poulan, wouldn't cut it.Buy the best you can afford.you'll save money in the long run.
happy turning

mike kelly
02-19-2006, 11:58 AM
I would consider stepping up a bit in power because you'll be making rip cuts to make bowl blanks.Tried to rip a piece of dried live oak one time with a 14" poulan, wouldn't cut it.Buy the best you can afford.you'll save money in the long run.
happy turning

Bob Smalser
02-19-2006, 12:22 PM
http://pic3.picturetrail.com/VOL12/1104763/3223936/39615107.jpg

The problem with gaining more power in a Stihl or other good saw is gaining more weight....right up until you get a permanent and painful kink in your bicep tendon. I hate using my big 046 with a passion because of it.

http://pic3.picturetrail.com/VOL12/1104763/4110272/50978769.jpg

But "a smallish saw for around the house" and "ripping large blocks of oak for the lathe" are two very different critters.

If he's gonna cut mostly firewood and the occasional bowl blank, then a 14" bar 026 or the modern Stihl or Husky equivalent is probably the best compromise between handiness and power. If ripping blanks is the main task, then a larger more powerful saw like the 046, a longer bar like 24", and a couple ripping chains (Baileys in Laytonville) in addition to crosscut chains are advised. If he's gonna run it as a chainsaw mill, then look at the Jonsereds.

Bob Smalser
02-19-2006, 12:22 PM
http://pic3.picturetrail.com/VOL12/1104763/3223936/39615107.jpg

The problem with gaining more power in a Stihl or other good saw is gaining more weight....right up until you get a permanent and painful kink in your bicep tendon. I hate using my big 046 with a passion because of it.

http://pic3.picturetrail.com/VOL12/1104763/4110272/50978769.jpg

But "a smallish saw for around the house" and "ripping large blocks of oak for the lathe" are two very different critters.

If he's gonna cut mostly firewood and the occasional bowl blank, then a 14" bar 026 or the modern Stihl or Husky equivalent is probably the best compromise between handiness and power. If ripping blanks is the main task, then a larger more powerful saw like the 046, a longer bar like 24", and a couple ripping chains (Baileys in Laytonville) in addition to crosscut chains are advised. If he's gonna run it as a chainsaw mill, then look at the Jonsereds.

Bob Smalser
02-19-2006, 12:22 PM
http://pic3.picturetrail.com/VOL12/1104763/3223936/39615107.jpg

The problem with gaining more power in a Stihl or other good saw is gaining more weight....right up until you get a permanent and painful kink in your bicep tendon. I hate using my big 046 with a passion because of it.

http://pic3.picturetrail.com/VOL12/1104763/4110272/50978769.jpg

But "a smallish saw for around the house" and "ripping large blocks of oak for the lathe" are two very different critters.

If he's gonna cut mostly firewood and the occasional bowl blank, then a 14" bar 026 or the modern Stihl or Husky equivalent is probably the best compromise between handiness and power. If ripping blanks is the main task, then a larger more powerful saw like the 046, a longer bar like 24", and a couple ripping chains (Baileys in Laytonville) in addition to crosscut chains are advised. If he's gonna run it as a chainsaw mill, then look at the Jonsereds.

Alan D. Hyde
02-20-2006, 02:40 PM
Bob, if you think that 046 is heavy, you need to spend a day with an 065. :D

My back can STILL remember the last time I did that. Luckily, our 29 year-old son is very fond of the 065, so we work out some deals that way.

BUT--- it gets the job done (I think the newer ones are lighter).

Alan

[ 02-20-2006, 02:41 PM: Message edited by: Alan D. Hyde ]

Alan D. Hyde
02-20-2006, 02:40 PM
Bob, if you think that 046 is heavy, you need to spend a day with an 065. :D

My back can STILL remember the last time I did that. Luckily, our 29 year-old son is very fond of the 065, so we work out some deals that way.

BUT--- it gets the job done (I think the newer ones are lighter).

Alan

[ 02-20-2006, 02:41 PM: Message edited by: Alan D. Hyde ]

Alan D. Hyde
02-20-2006, 02:40 PM
Bob, if you think that 046 is heavy, you need to spend a day with an 065. :D

My back can STILL remember the last time I did that. Luckily, our 29 year-old son is very fond of the 065, so we work out some deals that way.

BUT--- it gets the job done (I think the newer ones are lighter).

Alan

[ 02-20-2006, 02:41 PM: Message edited by: Alan D. Hyde ]