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Mike Field
10-24-2000, 10:35 PM
Does anyone have any ideas where I might get hold of an old hand-operated rope-making machine?

Mike Field
10-24-2000, 10:35 PM
Does anyone have any ideas where I might get hold of an old hand-operated rope-making machine?

Mike Field
10-24-2000, 10:35 PM
Does anyone have any ideas where I might get hold of an old hand-operated rope-making machine?

Todd Bradshaw
10-24-2000, 10:49 PM
If worse comes to worse, check a couple of books on ship modeling. Most of them have some sort of plan for building one. You would just need to enlarge them to build bigger stuff.

Todd Bradshaw
10-24-2000, 10:49 PM
If worse comes to worse, check a couple of books on ship modeling. Most of them have some sort of plan for building one. You would just need to enlarge them to build bigger stuff.

Todd Bradshaw
10-24-2000, 10:49 PM
If worse comes to worse, check a couple of books on ship modeling. Most of them have some sort of plan for building one. You would just need to enlarge them to build bigger stuff.

htom
10-24-2000, 11:21 PM
Your local Boy Scout Council might have one that they use at annual displays, if they have not discarded it.

htom
10-24-2000, 11:21 PM
Your local Boy Scout Council might have one that they use at annual displays, if they have not discarded it.

htom
10-24-2000, 11:21 PM
Your local Boy Scout Council might have one that they use at annual displays, if they have not discarded it.

TomRobb
10-25-2000, 06:44 AM
I was going to suggest Mystic Seaport in Connecticut until I looked at your location. They have a rope walk on display. Email them perhaps? It's really a pretty simple affair - a board with three cranks to twist the fibers of the three strands. Perhaps the Boy Scout Manual was a better idea. Maybe an old one from their Junior Woodchuck days, before they got into Urban Chic.

TomRobb
10-25-2000, 06:44 AM
I was going to suggest Mystic Seaport in Connecticut until I looked at your location. They have a rope walk on display. Email them perhaps? It's really a pretty simple affair - a board with three cranks to twist the fibers of the three strands. Perhaps the Boy Scout Manual was a better idea. Maybe an old one from their Junior Woodchuck days, before they got into Urban Chic.

TomRobb
10-25-2000, 06:44 AM
I was going to suggest Mystic Seaport in Connecticut until I looked at your location. They have a rope walk on display. Email them perhaps? It's really a pretty simple affair - a board with three cranks to twist the fibers of the three strands. Perhaps the Boy Scout Manual was a better idea. Maybe an old one from their Junior Woodchuck days, before they got into Urban Chic.

Mike DeHart
10-25-2000, 09:24 AM
I must have made miles of rope in my old Boy Scout troop. I even made one of the machines. It is just a plank with three holes in line, three cranks bent from coat hanger wire (each with a hook to hold the twine), and a small board, to use as a crank handle, that has three matching holes for the offset ends of the wire cranks. The key is to keep the same number of turns in each of the three strands. You will also need a rope wrench, which looks like a small ping-pong paddle with three large notches in it, one on top and one each side. One strand runs through each notch and they are tied together behind the wrench. Pull on the wrench to keep tension in the strands while someone cranks. Be sure to crank in the direction that tightens the twist in the strands. As the strands are wound tight enough, you pull the wrench toward the cranks, keep tension in the rope behind, and the strands will twist themselves into rope. Pull back the wrench to tighten the twist. It took us at least three people: one to crank, one to wrench, and one to hold tension on the end of the forming rope to prevent tangles.

[This message has been edited by Mike DeHart (edited 10-25-2000).]

Mike DeHart
10-25-2000, 09:24 AM
I must have made miles of rope in my old Boy Scout troop. I even made one of the machines. It is just a plank with three holes in line, three cranks bent from coat hanger wire (each with a hook to hold the twine), and a small board, to use as a crank handle, that has three matching holes for the offset ends of the wire cranks. The key is to keep the same number of turns in each of the three strands. You will also need a rope wrench, which looks like a small ping-pong paddle with three large notches in it, one on top and one each side. One strand runs through each notch and they are tied together behind the wrench. Pull on the wrench to keep tension in the strands while someone cranks. Be sure to crank in the direction that tightens the twist in the strands. As the strands are wound tight enough, you pull the wrench toward the cranks, keep tension in the rope behind, and the strands will twist themselves into rope. Pull back the wrench to tighten the twist. It took us at least three people: one to crank, one to wrench, and one to hold tension on the end of the forming rope to prevent tangles.

[This message has been edited by Mike DeHart (edited 10-25-2000).]

Mike DeHart
10-25-2000, 09:24 AM
I must have made miles of rope in my old Boy Scout troop. I even made one of the machines. It is just a plank with three holes in line, three cranks bent from coat hanger wire (each with a hook to hold the twine), and a small board, to use as a crank handle, that has three matching holes for the offset ends of the wire cranks. The key is to keep the same number of turns in each of the three strands. You will also need a rope wrench, which looks like a small ping-pong paddle with three large notches in it, one on top and one each side. One strand runs through each notch and they are tied together behind the wrench. Pull on the wrench to keep tension in the strands while someone cranks. Be sure to crank in the direction that tightens the twist in the strands. As the strands are wound tight enough, you pull the wrench toward the cranks, keep tension in the rope behind, and the strands will twist themselves into rope. Pull back the wrench to tighten the twist. It took us at least three people: one to crank, one to wrench, and one to hold tension on the end of the forming rope to prevent tangles.

[This message has been edited by Mike DeHart (edited 10-25-2000).]

Mike Field
10-27-2000, 08:12 AM
Indeed, I do remember seeing one of these machines when I was in the Boy Scouts, but that's a long time ago now, and the details are somewhat hazy....

Thanks to yuo all for your comments. Also many thanks to Jack Dillon for sending me some sketches.

Mike Field
10-27-2000, 08:12 AM
Indeed, I do remember seeing one of these machines when I was in the Boy Scouts, but that's a long time ago now, and the details are somewhat hazy....

Thanks to yuo all for your comments. Also many thanks to Jack Dillon for sending me some sketches.

Mike Field
10-27-2000, 08:12 AM
Indeed, I do remember seeing one of these machines when I was in the Boy Scouts, but that's a long time ago now, and the details are somewhat hazy....

Thanks to yuo all for your comments. Also many thanks to Jack Dillon for sending me some sketches.