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Jim Charewicz
01-09-2001, 09:46 AM
Where can I get a small steam generating device? I want to bend some ribs for canoe.
Has anyone ever converted a wallpaper steamer to use for bending wood?

Jim Charewicz
01-09-2001, 09:46 AM
Where can I get a small steam generating device? I want to bend some ribs for canoe.
Has anyone ever converted a wallpaper steamer to use for bending wood?

Jim Charewicz
01-09-2001, 09:46 AM
Where can I get a small steam generating device? I want to bend some ribs for canoe.
Has anyone ever converted a wallpaper steamer to use for bending wood?

Bruce Hooke
01-09-2001, 10:03 AM
I have definately heard of people using wallpaper steamers. What has worked well for me for small steaming jobs such as the one you are engaged in is two pots of boiling water on the kitchen stove connected by steam hose to a steambox above the stove. However, this method may not meet with the approval of other members of the household. In addition, if your shop is not close to the kitchen that could be a problem since you have to move quick once the wood is out of the steambox. Also, if your kitchen is wallpapered be careful how much steam you let into the air -- you might find the wallpaper and the walls have parted company. - Bruce

Bruce Hooke
01-09-2001, 10:03 AM
I have definately heard of people using wallpaper steamers. What has worked well for me for small steaming jobs such as the one you are engaged in is two pots of boiling water on the kitchen stove connected by steam hose to a steambox above the stove. However, this method may not meet with the approval of other members of the household. In addition, if your shop is not close to the kitchen that could be a problem since you have to move quick once the wood is out of the steambox. Also, if your kitchen is wallpapered be careful how much steam you let into the air -- you might find the wallpaper and the walls have parted company. - Bruce

Bruce Hooke
01-09-2001, 10:03 AM
I have definately heard of people using wallpaper steamers. What has worked well for me for small steaming jobs such as the one you are engaged in is two pots of boiling water on the kitchen stove connected by steam hose to a steambox above the stove. However, this method may not meet with the approval of other members of the household. In addition, if your shop is not close to the kitchen that could be a problem since you have to move quick once the wood is out of the steambox. Also, if your kitchen is wallpapered be careful how much steam you let into the air -- you might find the wallpaper and the walls have parted company. - Bruce

Ron Williamson
01-09-2001, 12:50 PM
You could use an electric kettle with the steam line stuck in the spout,gasketed with a rag.

Ron Williamson
01-09-2001, 12:50 PM
You could use an electric kettle with the steam line stuck in the spout,gasketed with a rag.

Ron Williamson
01-09-2001, 12:50 PM
You could use an electric kettle with the steam line stuck in the spout,gasketed with a rag.

Art Read
01-09-2001, 02:14 PM
Ah, steam generaters! My favorite part of boatbuilding... This is one place you can throw "tradition" out the window and really indulge the creative and or "disturbed" side of your personality. I've used everything from flexible heating ducts to plastic sheeting for a "steambox", auto type hoses make good "piping" material. For the generater itself you just need a good source of heat, (an outdoor, propane "cooker" worked for me) and a metal container with enough volume to hold enough water to last the whole session and a small enough opening that you can direct the steam into the "box" effeciently. The only thing you DON'T want to do is be so "fussy" about it that no steam can "escape". You do NOT want to build up any steam preasure!

Art Read
01-09-2001, 02:14 PM
Ah, steam generaters! My favorite part of boatbuilding... This is one place you can throw "tradition" out the window and really indulge the creative and or "disturbed" side of your personality. I've used everything from flexible heating ducts to plastic sheeting for a "steambox", auto type hoses make good "piping" material. For the generater itself you just need a good source of heat, (an outdoor, propane "cooker" worked for me) and a metal container with enough volume to hold enough water to last the whole session and a small enough opening that you can direct the steam into the "box" effeciently. The only thing you DON'T want to do is be so "fussy" about it that no steam can "escape". You do NOT want to build up any steam preasure!

Art Read
01-09-2001, 02:14 PM
Ah, steam generaters! My favorite part of boatbuilding... This is one place you can throw "tradition" out the window and really indulge the creative and or "disturbed" side of your personality. I've used everything from flexible heating ducts to plastic sheeting for a "steambox", auto type hoses make good "piping" material. For the generater itself you just need a good source of heat, (an outdoor, propane "cooker" worked for me) and a metal container with enough volume to hold enough water to last the whole session and a small enough opening that you can direct the steam into the "box" effeciently. The only thing you DON'T want to do is be so "fussy" about it that no steam can "escape". You do NOT want to build up any steam preasure!

Ed Harrow
01-10-2001, 12:51 PM
Further to Ron's comment:
http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.asp?page=31161&category=1%2C42172&SID=&ccurrency=2

Note there is a link to a steam-bending discussion on this page.

Using a tea kettle doesn't seem very likely, but for little stuff like canoe bits it ought to do just fine, and if you use the one of the stove think of all the money you save (Just remember to take SWMBO out in compensation). Ed

[This message has been edited by Ed Harrow (edited 01-10-2001).]

[This message has been edited by Ed Harrow (edited 01-10-2001).]

Ed Harrow
01-10-2001, 12:51 PM
Further to Ron's comment:
http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.asp?page=31161&category=1%2C42172&SID=&ccurrency=2

Note there is a link to a steam-bending discussion on this page.

Using a tea kettle doesn't seem very likely, but for little stuff like canoe bits it ought to do just fine, and if you use the one of the stove think of all the money you save (Just remember to take SWMBO out in compensation). Ed

[This message has been edited by Ed Harrow (edited 01-10-2001).]

[This message has been edited by Ed Harrow (edited 01-10-2001).]

Ed Harrow
01-10-2001, 12:51 PM
Further to Ron's comment:
http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.asp?page=31161&category=1%2C42172&SID=&ccurrency=2

Note there is a link to a steam-bending discussion on this page.

Using a tea kettle doesn't seem very likely, but for little stuff like canoe bits it ought to do just fine, and if you use the one of the stove think of all the money you save (Just remember to take SWMBO out in compensation). Ed

[This message has been edited by Ed Harrow (edited 01-10-2001).]

[This message has been edited by Ed Harrow (edited 01-10-2001).]

Ross Faneuf
01-10-2001, 01:12 PM
WoodenBoat has had several articles on steam bending, including a fascinating one a few years ago with pictures of various devices cobbled up by various people. Go to the WB Index page and try a search for 'steam box'; lots of entries. I think my favorite was an old gas can on a charcoal grill, or something like that.

Ross Faneuf
01-10-2001, 01:12 PM
WoodenBoat has had several articles on steam bending, including a fascinating one a few years ago with pictures of various devices cobbled up by various people. Go to the WB Index page and try a search for 'steam box'; lots of entries. I think my favorite was an old gas can on a charcoal grill, or something like that.

Ross Faneuf
01-10-2001, 01:12 PM
WoodenBoat has had several articles on steam bending, including a fascinating one a few years ago with pictures of various devices cobbled up by various people. Go to the WB Index page and try a search for 'steam box'; lots of entries. I think my favorite was an old gas can on a charcoal grill, or something like that.

TomRobb
01-10-2001, 03:00 PM
Above advise is just fine.
Useless Information: On This Old House last week Steve or Norm, I forget which, took one of their side trips to see Old Ironsides. The shop setup they have is enough to make you weep with joy. Navy budget money works wonders. They were steaming a new plank for the old girl. Looked to be about 4"x10"x20' or 30'. It was bent with chainfalls around steel bars stuck in a grid on the floor at the end of the steam box. Their steam generator looked like it would heat a rather large building. Trick! Did anyone else see it?

TomRobb
01-10-2001, 03:00 PM
Above advise is just fine.
Useless Information: On This Old House last week Steve or Norm, I forget which, took one of their side trips to see Old Ironsides. The shop setup they have is enough to make you weep with joy. Navy budget money works wonders. They were steaming a new plank for the old girl. Looked to be about 4"x10"x20' or 30'. It was bent with chainfalls around steel bars stuck in a grid on the floor at the end of the steam box. Their steam generator looked like it would heat a rather large building. Trick! Did anyone else see it?

TomRobb
01-10-2001, 03:00 PM
Above advise is just fine.
Useless Information: On This Old House last week Steve or Norm, I forget which, took one of their side trips to see Old Ironsides. The shop setup they have is enough to make you weep with joy. Navy budget money works wonders. They were steaming a new plank for the old girl. Looked to be about 4"x10"x20' or 30'. It was bent with chainfalls around steel bars stuck in a grid on the floor at the end of the steam box. Their steam generator looked like it would heat a rather large building. Trick! Did anyone else see it?

abe
01-10-2001, 03:16 PM
Good description and use of steam box for canoe ribs in Jerry Stelmok's "Wood and Canvas Canoe" book. Link below. Also available from WB store.
http://www.wcha.org/builders/island/books.html

Your steam box will need to accomodate ribs from about 30" to over 60". Your ribs will require a good soaking in a large pot before hand to prevent drying out in the steam.

another interesting approach:
http://catalog.com/bobpone/steambox.htm

If you use the search feature of the forum, type in the words - steam box - and all sorts of info will appear!

Welcome to the forum Jim.

[This message has been edited by abe (edited 01-10-2001).]

abe
01-10-2001, 03:16 PM
Good description and use of steam box for canoe ribs in Jerry Stelmok's "Wood and Canvas Canoe" book. Link below. Also available from WB store.
http://www.wcha.org/builders/island/books.html

Your steam box will need to accomodate ribs from about 30" to over 60". Your ribs will require a good soaking in a large pot before hand to prevent drying out in the steam.

another interesting approach:
http://catalog.com/bobpone/steambox.htm

If you use the search feature of the forum, type in the words - steam box - and all sorts of info will appear!

Welcome to the forum Jim.

[This message has been edited by abe (edited 01-10-2001).]

abe
01-10-2001, 03:16 PM
Good description and use of steam box for canoe ribs in Jerry Stelmok's "Wood and Canvas Canoe" book. Link below. Also available from WB store.
http://www.wcha.org/builders/island/books.html

Your steam box will need to accomodate ribs from about 30" to over 60". Your ribs will require a good soaking in a large pot before hand to prevent drying out in the steam.

another interesting approach:
http://catalog.com/bobpone/steambox.htm

If you use the search feature of the forum, type in the words - steam box - and all sorts of info will appear!

Welcome to the forum Jim.

[This message has been edited by abe (edited 01-10-2001).]

Jamie Hascall
01-10-2001, 05:46 PM
My favorite steambox was one I saw at Anchor Jensens' shop in Seattle. It consisted of a small boiler pumping steam into a section of the old 16" coopered wooden pipe that used to carry all water around the city. It must have been made of cedar as they still keep digging up intact pieces of it.I think there's a chunk of it down at the Center for Wooden Boats too.

Jamie

Jamie Hascall
01-10-2001, 05:46 PM
My favorite steambox was one I saw at Anchor Jensens' shop in Seattle. It consisted of a small boiler pumping steam into a section of the old 16" coopered wooden pipe that used to carry all water around the city. It must have been made of cedar as they still keep digging up intact pieces of it.I think there's a chunk of it down at the Center for Wooden Boats too.

Jamie

Jamie Hascall
01-10-2001, 05:46 PM
My favorite steambox was one I saw at Anchor Jensens' shop in Seattle. It consisted of a small boiler pumping steam into a section of the old 16" coopered wooden pipe that used to carry all water around the city. It must have been made of cedar as they still keep digging up intact pieces of it.I think there's a chunk of it down at the Center for Wooden Boats too.

Jamie

Art Read
01-11-2001, 03:17 AM
Tom... I watched that too. Loved it when Steve asked, "So, you ever had one break on you?" Did you notice that those planks were for LAMINATING to full thickness? I was actually there a couple summers ago. Pried loose a piece of live oak from the pile of wood they had taken off the ship during the last rebuild and scarfed into my keel. (Read somewhere that a piece of stolen wood in the keel will make her sail faster at night....)

[This message has been edited by Art Read (edited 01-11-2001).]

Art Read
01-11-2001, 03:17 AM
Tom... I watched that too. Loved it when Steve asked, "So, you ever had one break on you?" Did you notice that those planks were for LAMINATING to full thickness? I was actually there a couple summers ago. Pried loose a piece of live oak from the pile of wood they had taken off the ship during the last rebuild and scarfed into my keel. (Read somewhere that a piece of stolen wood in the keel will make her sail faster at night....)

[This message has been edited by Art Read (edited 01-11-2001).]

Art Read
01-11-2001, 03:17 AM
Tom... I watched that too. Loved it when Steve asked, "So, you ever had one break on you?" Did you notice that those planks were for LAMINATING to full thickness? I was actually there a couple summers ago. Pried loose a piece of live oak from the pile of wood they had taken off the ship during the last rebuild and scarfed into my keel. (Read somewhere that a piece of stolen wood in the keel will make her sail faster at night....)

[This message has been edited by Art Read (edited 01-11-2001).]

Charlie J
01-11-2001, 08:48 AM
we've used both a pressure cooker with the hose on the tube where the weight goes, and a larger pressure canner sitting on a campstove. In a real pinch, I've lined cardboard with aluminum foil and folded it into a triangle for a steam box. Didn't last beyond one piece, but that's all we needed it for.

Charlie J
01-11-2001, 08:48 AM
we've used both a pressure cooker with the hose on the tube where the weight goes, and a larger pressure canner sitting on a campstove. In a real pinch, I've lined cardboard with aluminum foil and folded it into a triangle for a steam box. Didn't last beyond one piece, but that's all we needed it for.

Charlie J
01-11-2001, 08:48 AM
we've used both a pressure cooker with the hose on the tube where the weight goes, and a larger pressure canner sitting on a campstove. In a real pinch, I've lined cardboard with aluminum foil and folded it into a triangle for a steam box. Didn't last beyond one piece, but that's all we needed it for.

jake
01-11-2001, 12:41 PM
I have steam bent literally a ton or more of wood for recurving bows.

I first simply set a pan(5 gal pail) on a grill on several
cinder blocks over a fire, water in the pan.

Several feet to the side is two lengths of stove pipe fitted together, suspended upright, with an ell from the bottom to a length of pipe to the top of the pan, another ell pointing downward to the pan and then between the mouth of the ell to the pan wrapped with aluminum foil.

I use the side length so as not to have too much heat in the stovepipe, for larger pcs of wood some heat can be good, I was steaming pcs of about 3" X 3" usually. The pcs sit in the vertical pipe on a simple grid of cut wire from clothes hangers. This would easily handle 4 X 6's. You can make it as long as you want by how many sections you add.some condensation will run back into the bucket if you partially close the top pipe end.

works for me.

jake
01-11-2001, 12:41 PM
I have steam bent literally a ton or more of wood for recurving bows.

I first simply set a pan(5 gal pail) on a grill on several
cinder blocks over a fire, water in the pan.

Several feet to the side is two lengths of stove pipe fitted together, suspended upright, with an ell from the bottom to a length of pipe to the top of the pan, another ell pointing downward to the pan and then between the mouth of the ell to the pan wrapped with aluminum foil.

I use the side length so as not to have too much heat in the stovepipe, for larger pcs of wood some heat can be good, I was steaming pcs of about 3" X 3" usually. The pcs sit in the vertical pipe on a simple grid of cut wire from clothes hangers. This would easily handle 4 X 6's. You can make it as long as you want by how many sections you add.some condensation will run back into the bucket if you partially close the top pipe end.

works for me.

jake
01-11-2001, 12:41 PM
I have steam bent literally a ton or more of wood for recurving bows.

I first simply set a pan(5 gal pail) on a grill on several
cinder blocks over a fire, water in the pan.

Several feet to the side is two lengths of stove pipe fitted together, suspended upright, with an ell from the bottom to a length of pipe to the top of the pan, another ell pointing downward to the pan and then between the mouth of the ell to the pan wrapped with aluminum foil.

I use the side length so as not to have too much heat in the stovepipe, for larger pcs of wood some heat can be good, I was steaming pcs of about 3" X 3" usually. The pcs sit in the vertical pipe on a simple grid of cut wire from clothes hangers. This would easily handle 4 X 6's. You can make it as long as you want by how many sections you add.some condensation will run back into the bucket if you partially close the top pipe end.

works for me.