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MoMan
02-25-2014, 09:59 AM
I guess it’s time to start my build thread.

I’m always curious about the builders who post here, so I thought I would offer up a mini bio of myself. This may be more information than you are interested in, but if you’re trolling through the Wooden Boat Forum, you probably have time to kill. This also helps you calibrate your level of vitriol/advice to direct at me throughout my build.

I grew up in a small city in western Nebraska and moved to Houston after earning a B.A. in English in 1988. My two sisters were already living here, and one made me a very attractive offer: live with her and her husband while rebuilding their fence and deck. In exchange, they paid for me to travel in Europe for a few weeks. Best summer of my life! That September, I left for a nine week solo backpacking adventure that took me to a dozen western Europe countries.

Back in Houston I landed a marketing/media relations internship at a science museum — a dream job for an English major. That turned into a full time job that lasted 8 years. I loved it. From there I went into the financial services industry, writing marketing and sales literature for a mutual fund company and later, an insurance company where I am currently employed. I enjoy the creative writing opportunities (which you might not expect in such a conservative industry), and the pay and benefits are attractive – especially for a liberal arts major.

I was introduced to sailing by way of windsurfing. When the wind was above 15kts, I could strap the board, mast and boom on my car roof racks and be on Galveston Bay in about 45 minutes to an hour depending on traffic. My main setback was that the wind doesn’t blow much above 10 for most of the summer around here, so I made a lot of fruitless trips to the coast. N. Padre Island, a 5+ hour drive south, was perfect: the wind was always honking and the Bird Island Basin area was mostly chest deep.


--more soon--

MoMan
02-25-2014, 10:04 AM
My current ride is a 1979 small, 15 foot Chrysler Mutineer. I bought it from my Dad in 1996 and hauled it down to Houston. It’s really a racing boat, and it can be pretty fun in the right conditions, especially when I have someone aboard who knows a little about sailing.

It’s sloop-rigged, centerboard, kick-up rudder, boltrope main, roller-furled luffwire jib, snout-launched spinnaker w/ lines to cockpit., no ballast, Elvstrom self bailers. I take it out a couple of times a year at most, so I’m no pro.



http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3800/9759995403_26d5e22ded_o.jpg


http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3792/9759924915_f7ab1a03b7_o.jpg



http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3748/9759707062_d2c8b6174f_c.jpg



http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2840/9759915354_d54202d6f1_o.jpg


Likes:
Lightweight. 500 lbs empty
Very shallow draft
Planes in 12-15kt
Responsive
Maneuverable in tight places
Cockpit controls. I can unfurl and douse jib and spinnaker from cockpit.
Elvstrom bailers are somewhat effective while planing (or nearly so).

Dislikes:
Very tender. I can’t let go of tiller for more than a couple of seconds (I installed a tiller tamer, but it’s only useful in very light winds).
Cockpit is cramped. The bench seats are too low for my back and aging knees. Three people is a crowd.
Zero storage (save for a 2 cu. ft. cuddy where I keep a 12v battery).
Boom is a skull-level menace (ask my wife).
Boltrope main sail is difficult to drop in an emergency (especially when solo). Besides having to go out on the tippy foredeck to uncleat it from the mast head, the bolt rope often snags in the aluminum mast channel; not a good scenario in chop and squirrely winds!
Vulnerable to gusts.
Parking lot set up takes too long.
The novelty of stepping that long, heavy aluminum mast wore off years ago when I cracked a rib in a fall.
I don’t feel comfortable sailing it in anything above 15kts.
No proper reefing ability (I did add reef points to my new sail, but this thing isn’t designed to reef.)

Following are the main factors that led me to pick the Pathfinder

There are lots of these already built, and currently under construction, not to mention her smaller, older sister, the Navigator. That offers plenty of support and experience to draw from. Another major draw is Mr. Welsford’s active presence online here and on the Yahoo! Groups. I’m still kicking myself for missing the opportunity to meet him in person a couple of years ago when he visited central Texas. I’m hoping he will return again (preferably right after I finish my build).

The sailing experiences I’ve read about on this design are impressive. From everything I’ve seen, Pathfinder is rock solid and should easily handle any of the conditions I am most likely to find myself in. I am confident it will meet all my expectations.

According to the write ups, the hull comes in at around 480 lbs, which is pretty light in my book. My Mutineer is slightly heavier at 500, but considering how much cockpit space I am gaining, it’s pretty amazing.

I do love the traditional look—especially the bowsprit, yawl sail plan, etc. I have a confession here: I originally got interested in building a boat when I stumbled across the Stevenson Weekender online. It looked interesting enough. Then I saw WoodenBoat magazine at a Rockler store, and that led to the WoodenBoat Forum, where I’ve been absorbing information as fast as my addled brain can accommodate.

For a long time, I was determined to build something with a tiny cabin. I don’t know why, but that tiny, enclosed space had some kind of hold on me. The fact that I could build the Pathfinder with or without a cabin seems perfect. After reading numerous threads here, I have decided to build it open and see how that feels. As Perry Burton has demonstrated, you can change your mind and add the cabin later.

My sailing grounds: No blue water fantasies. Mostly day sailing and camp sailing on Texas lakes, perhaps Galveston Bay, with the potential of an ICW trip down the Texas coast someday (e.g. Texas 200). Probably a lot of time on Lake Livingston (90 miles N of Houston). It’s a pretty good-sized 84,000 acre reservoir, so when the wind kicks up, it can drive a good chop of 2-4 feet. I mostly stick to an area that is 10-12 feet deep, BUT, in areas, the lake has many submerged trees with branches intact and a few other underwater obstacles so a centerboard and kick up rudder are positives. Coastal tides here (as far as I know) are pretty tame; nothing like the east and west coasts.

Stable. I know, I know—stability is a relative term. I want it to feel much more stable relative to the Mutineer. e.g. I don’t want to have to scramble to rebalance it every time the wind varies by 3 kts. or catapult me off the rails when a friend steps on/off the opposite rail (DAMHIK). I want to feel comfortable in 15 kts, still in control in 20 kts. and capable of returning to the dock intact in 25 kts.
Trailer-sailer. Needs to be towed, launched and retrieved by my 2007 Subaru Outback (2.5 liter manual 4 cyl, all wheel drive, max. tow capacity 2,700 lbs.). It will live on the trailer under a poly tarp in my back yard.
Moderate beam. This will live in my backyard, which means squeezing through a 6 ft. wide double-gated fence (I will probably have to rebuild the fence to accommodate) and make a 90-degree turn onto the driveway. The Mutineer (with mast) just fits.
Solo friendly. I need to tend to lines, sails and equipment while underway without worrying about a knockdown every time a gust comes up. I guess that means some level of self-steering.
Accommodations: I want something that can sleep two adults on board for a long weekend, as well as have a comfortable enough cockpit for up to four adults for a day sail. Although camping ashore is desirable, I want the ability to sleep aboard. Around these parts, I would only camp from late October through late April as the Texas gulf coast is just too hot, humid and miserable for summer camping. From the start of my quest, I had been focusing only on pocket cruisers with cabins. I do want some decent shelter for stored gear.
Rowable. I have no illusions of rowing this vessel for a 5 mile stretch, but I see Mr. Welsford recommends tall oarlocks on the coamings, set up to row while standing and facing forward. I expect to sail 95% of the time, but when the wind dies, this may be helpful. I have a 35lb thrust Minnkota, which is OK for nonwind maneuvering, but I am leaning towards a Torqeedo electric for aux. power.

Other considerations:
Rig: Since neither my wife nor any of my friends are knowledgeable about sailing, I will likely have to do 80-90% of the sailing work. That means I’ll need a fairly simple rig with much flexibility (in terms of reefing or dropping sail quickly in heavier wind). From a purely aesthetic standpoint, I love the look of a gaff main with yawl mizzen and a headsail.

Speed: I don’t need to plane. I have zero interest in racing (despite the fact that it would likely improve my sailing skills), so I’m OK with a somewhat slower vessel as long as it moves. I’m much more interested in stability over speed.

Build considerations: The majority of it will be built in my 2-car garage which is my wood shop. While I’ve been woodworking since high school, my only boat-building experience thus far is a 16-foot western red cedar strip canoe (Prospector, Bear Mountain Boats). I wanted to try a different build method than strip.

Here are other designs I considered in random order:

Selway-Fisher’s Grey Swan and Sandgrouse
Devlin’s Nancy’s China
CLC PocketShip
Welsford’s Scamp, Tread Lightly and Sweet Pea
Karl Stambaugh’s Meadow Bird 16
Iain Oughtred’s Wee Seal and Eun Na Mara
OK, full disclosure: Like others on the forum, Eun Na Mara is becoming my “bucket list” boat—the one I really want to build someday. Pretty sure I’m out of my league by even remotely considering her now. It’s slightly bigger than my criteria calls for, so I would have to modify my garage and extend the back end to accommodate her, and I would probably have to pay to store her somewhere beyond my back yard. Maybe I’ll tackle that one when I retire.

MoMan
02-25-2014, 10:19 AM
Step 1. Build a canoe.


http://farm7.staticflickr.com/6193/6086836341_8c988d9f91_z.jpg



http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3823/8832130888_01674855f3_z.jpg

I know that doing a “pre-build” is not necessarily the recommended route to take, especially with a designer like Mr. Welsford who writes plans aimed at amateurs. It wasn’t that I had a burning desire to own a canoe, but I wanted to take on a relatively big (for me) long term project to see if I would like it, or if I would abandon it midway through.

I loved it. I love having an ongoing project that I can pop into the garage for an evening or a weekend, or put it off for a month and come back to it. While the strip build technique is completely different from glued lap, I learned a great deal. Perhaps the most valuable lesson is maintaining an organized work space. Mid way through the canoe build, I could barely walk through my garage and I started hating it.

MoMan
02-25-2014, 10:36 AM
So on to step 2:
Reorganize the garage/workshop. I dusted off my New Yankee Workshop plans for a garage hutch, which replaced a wall’s worth of inefficiently used storage space.
Before:


http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8385/8492589842_91b393937f_z.jpg


During:
http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8522/8492589808_92afe425e1_z.jpg



http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8095/8492589802_29ba39eddf_z.jpg


http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8525/8491490191_2245546b8e_z.jpg

And finished:


http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8236/8492591072_2cb4307cc2_c.jpg

MoMan
02-25-2014, 10:52 AM
I got the rest of my stationary tools onto mobile bases and added some casters for my workbench. I found a really cool design for an under-the-drill press storage chest, and another design for a wall mounted pegboard cabinet. Some friends gave me a boat storage pulley system, so I can hang the canoe from the rafters. So now I have run out of excuses to store crap to keep it off the floor. I do have to force myself to stop and put tools away, sweep the floor and toss out scraps that are too small to be useful.

Drill press area before:
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7119/8163003423_52a1033c89_z.jpg


Drill press storage cart
http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3757/12772466555_7ce6fb4c81_z.jpg

http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2832/12772933044_f987547878_z.jpg



http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3755/12772465485_a0d7c76f10_z.jpg

MoMan
02-25-2014, 11:06 AM
Here is the wall mounted pegboard cabinet (with a bonus peek at Catherine Bell's assets). Both doors pivot open, offering 4 generous panels to store stuff. Right now it's mostly table saw accessories.

http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3749/12772922394_6b280bb086_z.jpg




http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5513/12772630213_be93478d61_z.jpg

And finally a place for a few of my favorite clamps
http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5477/12772617663_6d2ba6226b_z.jpg

ahamaywine
02-25-2014, 11:49 AM
An exciting transformation, I am inspired to reorganize and revolutionize my workshop as well! I'm planning on starting a 5m, sloop rigged cabin cruiser in the near future!

swoody126
02-25-2014, 11:50 AM
SHOW OFF!!!:D

(insert POPCORN SMILEY FACE, here)

sw

MoMan
02-25-2014, 11:55 AM
SHOW OFF!!!:D

(insert POPCORN SMILEY FACE, here)

sw


Ha! You're only saying that because you aren't looking at the close up pix. As they say, "Good from far and far from good"

Ed Armstrong
02-25-2014, 12:10 PM
Nice organizational system. I foresee one of those workshop hutches in my future sometime soon!

Jamesh
02-25-2014, 12:18 PM
Is he ever going to build a boat!!!!!!

swoody126
02-25-2014, 01:31 PM
Is he ever going to build a boat!!!!!!

NOPE...

he's starting up one of those REALITY SHOWS about ORGANIZING HOARDER'S GARAGES:eek:

no tyme for important stuff

sw

MoMan
02-25-2014, 01:56 PM
Is he ever going to build a boat!!!!!!

Boy are YOU going to be disappointed!

Yes, I actually have cut a few (precious few) actual boat parts. But first, on with the pre-build.

Knowing myself and my admittedly messy shop ways, I took a good look at the 12 sheets as they unrolled from the packing tube. Those big flimsy sheets of paper don't stand a chance in my garage, so I needed a way to protect them while I sit scratching my head staring at them. I decided a lightweight piece of framed plywood would help. I thought about covering them with a protective sheet of plastic, but that would make it really heavy, and it needs to be portable. I also wanted something I could hang easily and temporarily.

http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3833/10915247864_53d9f160ea_z.jpg

It's super simple. Rare earth magnets are strong enough to hold about 3-4 sheets.
Some large fender washers hot melt glued to the back are what the magnets stick to. The wood pieces form a lip that hooks on the metal seams of my garage door: one for horizontal viewing, one for vertical viewing.

http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7343/10915439073_0c5f226caa_z.jpg


http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5495/10915140695_27c578900b_z.jpg

A scrap of wood behind holds the bottom out at a slight angle for better viewing.

swoody126
02-25-2014, 02:42 PM
Boy are YOU going to be disappointed!

Yes, I actually have cut a few (precious few) actual boat parts. But first, on with the pre-build.

Knowing myself and my admittedly messy shop ways, I took a good look at the 12 sheets as they unrolled from the packing tube. Those big flimsy sheets of paper don't stand a chance in my garage, so I needed a way to protect them while I sit scratching my head staring at them. I decided a lightweight piece of framed plywood would help. I thought about covering them with a protective sheet of plastic, but that would make it really heavy, and it needs to be portable. I also wanted something I could hang easily and temporarily.

http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3833/10915247864_53d9f160ea_z.jpg

It's super simple. Rare earth magnets are strong enough to hold about 3-4 sheets.
Some large fender washers hot melt glued to the back are what the magnets stick to. The wood pieces form a lip that hooks on the metal seams of my garage door: one for horizontal viewing, one for vertical viewing.

http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7343/10915439073_0c5f226caa_z.jpg


http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5495/10915140695_27c578900b_z.jpg

A scrap of wood behind holds the bottom out at a slight angle for better viewing.

a sheet of clear plastic table cloth, like they use in cafes, over your paper plans would give you the ability to make notes w/ COLORED WHITE BOARD MARKERS, which can simply be wiped off, when you're ready to move on to the next page

you could even take digital photos of the page w/ colored notations, for future reference±

just a old man's ponderments

don't stop now, you're on a roll!

sw

David G
02-25-2014, 02:54 PM
You're building up some serious momentum there. Should have that Pathfinder done in a month or so <G>

MoMan
02-25-2014, 03:16 PM
Next up is what the masses are champing at the bit for: Pictures of the build!


http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5529/10545578583_0e53bfef0b_z.jpg
Just kidding. This is only the build jig. My experience with the canoe demonstrated that building something this big requires a diagonal layout. That was a big consideration for getting everything on wheels. As the build grows, I will need to reposition everything.

And here are a couple of overall shots of the build space:


http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5541/10545577823_072d4a8e2d_z.jpg


http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7372/10913957975_d10f9aa4cd_z.jpg



http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2829/10913937895_5d0a70d266_z.jpg

After leveling, I drilled 3 holes into the concrete floor and drove some TapCon screws through L brackets to make sure nothing moves. The weights will also help keep her in place until I get some boat weight on it. I'll recheck my leveling and readjust those shims just before I start attaching profiles.

Late last fall, I discovered that a guy in the Friendswood area (about 45 miles south of my house) has been building a Pathfinder. I contacted him and went for a visit to see his build. He figures he is about 90% done, but it was great inspiration for me, and now I have a resource close by to see how things should go together.

MoMan
02-25-2014, 03:47 PM
I’m going with HydroTek plywood. It’s available at the two lumber yards I frequent: Clarks and Houston Hardwoods. The 9mm runs about $60 and the 12mm is around $85 per 4x8 sheet. For me, it’s pretty unnerving to line up the jig saw over those expensive sheets, so I bought a bunch of 1/8” ply (I think they were $12-$15/sheet) to make templates first. I like templates. I’m numerically challenged, and templates give me a shot of self confidence that I’ve properly interpreted Mr. Welsford’s numbers. It took me an embarrassingly long time to figure out the basic X-Y axis system of the plans.
The first piece out of the gate was the stem.
http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2841/11547939845_869c49f74a_z.jpg

That went pretty well. A little clean up with the block plane and some sandpaper and it was looking sweet.

This is my longboard, from canoe hull sanding. It's just a long sheet of plastic with some cork on one side and wooden blocks epoxied on for hand grips.
http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3681/11548073426_a3f6947322_z.jpg


You can see that my workbench doesn't stay clean for more than 5 minutes at a time.
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7317/11548071706_b0b3ffc244_z.jpg

Now, it's expensive wood cutting time.
http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3809/11548069566_87d39aaa09_z.jpg



Looks like it even belongs on the jig:
http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3767/11547931175_709aa4eeb9_z.jpg

MoMan
02-25-2014, 03:59 PM
a sheet of clear plastic table cloth, like they use in cafes, over your paper plans would give you the ability to make notes w/ COLORED WHITE BOARD MARKERS, which can simply be wiped off, when you're ready to move on to the next page

you could even take digital photos of the page w/ colored notations, for future reference±

Thanks Steve-- I'm interested. Any sources you can think of?

BBSebens
02-25-2014, 04:13 PM
Boy are YOU going to be disappointed!

Yes, I actually have cut a few (precious few) actual boat parts. But first, on with the pre-build.

Knowing myself and my admittedly messy shop ways, I took a good look at the 12 sheets as they unrolled from the packing tube. Those big flimsy sheets of paper don't stand a chance in my garage, so I needed a way to protect them while I sit scratching my head staring at them. I decided a lightweight piece of framed plywood would help. I thought about covering them with a protective sheet of plastic, but that would make it really heavy, and it needs to be portable. I also wanted something I could hang easily and temporarily.

http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3833/10915247864_53d9f160ea_z.jpg

It's super simple. Rare earth magnets are strong enough to hold about 3-4 sheets.
Some large fender washers hot melt glued to the back are what the magnets stick to. The wood pieces form a lip that hooks on the metal seams of my garage door: one for horizontal viewing, one for vertical viewing.

http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7343/10915439073_0c5f226caa_z.jpg


http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5495/10915140695_27c578900b_z.jpg

A scrap of wood behind holds the bottom out at a slight angle for better viewing.


Simple and effective. Brilliant!

Quite excellent.

Tom Robb
02-25-2014, 04:14 PM
Re beat up plans: I get mine Xeroxed at a local copy store so that I've got clean, undamaged versions to have on stand-by. Just a thought.

BBSebens
02-25-2014, 05:08 PM
Be careful with photocopiers. They utilize a lens which can create distortions in the copies. They may not be readily apparent, but when translated to full size, can create complications.

Having clean copies is good. Just be mindful.

swoody126
02-25-2014, 05:32 PM
Thanks Steve-- I'm interested. Any sources you can think of?

usually can be found @ good/better fabric/sewing shops

i got the idea from construction job sites where the foreman & crew were always making some kind of improvements/changes to the archie-techs formal drawings

BTW, i didn't see your roll-around THINKER'S chair and can only azz-u-me the coffee pot has a place of honor

dad n i had a couple roll-around chairs that put us at eye level, for major perusing/praising, our work

this sure is fun n u aint too far down the road(far as in TEXAS far)

sw

Tom Robb
02-28-2014, 12:53 PM
The original plans are distorted by humidity. I'd do measurements from the lofting, not the paper. Or your plans on Mylar?

keyhavenpotterer
02-28-2014, 02:01 PM
Is that the longer stem for the sloop? Or you going yawl rig?

MoMan
02-28-2014, 02:34 PM
I'm building the yawl, but I don't think the stem length changes between the two rigs; rather, placement of the reinforcing structure for the mast changes. I'm at work at the moment, so I don't have the plans in front of me.


Is that the longer stem for the sloop? Or you going yawl rig?

keyhavenpotterer
03-01-2014, 09:58 AM
Your right, it's Navigator that has the different stems...

Rik van der Vaart
03-01-2014, 05:56 PM
You have started! Awesome Moman. Looking forward to your progress. Just don't go too fast now... I want to be on the water before you.

MoMan
03-04-2014, 11:33 AM
The bow section of the stem calls for doublers on either side, so I used my template to cut 2 more pieces.

http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7316/11548084673_b30484d331_z.jpg

http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3810/11548063576_39abc8c64b_z.jpg

A coating of unthickened epoxy, followed by some thickened mixture, they were bonded for life. Some work with the block plane, and a bit of router trimming, it came out looking good.
Next up was the template for frame 1. I jumped in with a collection of measuring and marking instruments:
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7391/11789022226_52af1c2029_z.jpg

My poor eraser is getting a workout. I found what is called a plastic eraser at an art supply shop, and it works really well. I also bought a 5 foot long fiberglass batten from West Marine for my bigger curves, like the stem, but I'm mostly using a shorter one that I outfitted with some twine and a cord-lock spring. The twine isn't quite thick enough to stop the string from sliding out of the cord-lock, but it still helps.

http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3745/11788509473_178d51c508_z.jpg

To draw the curve, I tacked some brads into the template material and used my micro spring clamps to hold it in place to mark the line.
http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2817/11616923206_6640286020_z.jpg

The process is: lay out x-y axis, draw lines, check measurements, check plans, redraw line, recheck, erase previous line, remeasure, find different color pencil to distinguish from previous mistakes, repeat.
http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5517/11788703034_09803e2f93_z.jpg

MoMan
03-04-2014, 11:55 AM
Once I got the template for frame 1 cut, I set it on the jig to see how she looked. The kids in the neighborhood were very excited to see what looks like a cartoonish wooden elephant. I intend to disappoint them.
http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5506/11788689744_812508931b_z.jpg

I had the stem on the workbench to trim down the doublers, so here is another view:
http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2840/11616511944_85c03b3478_z.jpg

http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7352/11616910696_7b1f3a1b45_z.jpg

At this point, I have been puzzling over a detail on the plans, which calls for a cutout for the chine stringer. But when I view other people's build photos, I don't see any such cutout. Does it (frame 1) simply butt up against the chine stringer? Or do I actually cut out a notch? If I cut the notch, that would eliminate the limber holes. Maybe I have the limber holes drawn wrong.

After satisfactorily cutting the Frame 1 template down to size, I reached for some Hydrotek. Unfortunately I reached for the 12mm ply, and the plans call for 9mm for frame 1, so my boat is already unintentionally overbuilt! I plan to counter the additional weight with an extra 12pack of beer in my transom.

I thought I would be smart about cutting the plywood and affix the template to the H-tek, then use my awesome trimming bit in the router to duplicate my carefully sanded template.

http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2847/12275546155_abfc0cd16d_z.jpg

Of course I don't want a permanent bond, so I reached for the hot melt glue gun and went to town. I created two problems. First, the template material is very thin, which allows a very narrow margin of error. I'm not good a narrow error margins and a couple of spots the template bit slipped off and bit into the costly plywood. (this pic shows a doubler bonded in place, not the template material) Live and learn:
http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3757/12275642485_fd6faf6830_z.jpg

MoMan
03-04-2014, 12:08 PM
The second problem I created was the result of using hot melt glue. It worked a little too well and tore some of the surface veneer off the good ply. Note to self: use double stick carpet tape, or just clamp templates in place.

http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2867/12275680683_124519bd9b_z.jpg

http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5510/12275962594_84b6a27cb3_z.jpg

Fortunately It isn't too late to position those scars on the forward facing side. Having heard of others putting bits on the wrong sides of frames, I put a large notice (FWD and AFT) to myself in hopes of preventing that.

In other breaking news, I got my epoxy order from DuckWorks not too long ago. I think I got 4.5 gallons. The guy I talked with who is building a P-finder estimated he would end up using around 7 gallons total. The wife was quite disappointed to discover the actual contents of such a heavy box.
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7358/12275663865_c9a38ac0bd_z.jpg

MoMan
03-10-2014, 09:26 AM
Inching forward with some microscopic progress. I added the doubler at the top of frame #1, as well as the doublers that reinforce the stringer slots. The router and trim bit was much more effective here with the thicker material to provide the requisite surface for the bearing to ride on. After the epoxy cured I cut the stringer notches with the jig saw.

http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7322/12948275814_a5f43fe06d_z.jpg

http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3754/12947807365_7d8f12eec9_z.jpg


I also affixed the support piece for the anchor well floor on the forward side. Epoxy and 3 stainless steel screws.


http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7427/13060106874_bb4ab05d10_z.jpg

After a tremendous amount of teeth gnashing, head scratching, remeasuring and confidence building I laid out the lines for the stem slot, limber holes and drain/ventilation holes, along with the support pieces for the floor and fired up the jig saw:
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7332/13059802595_eff7b8560d_z.jpg
The piece of scrap ply is stuck in the slot to help align the other support pieces while I drilled the screw holes. The nails were to hold the stem slot pieces in alignment until the epoxy kicked off. I left everything a little long for trimming later.

MoMan
03-10-2014, 09:58 AM
Some neat epoxy followed by a mix of West 406 thickener, then clamp and wait.
http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3133/13060115304_b7b4b89d9e_z.jpg



http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7371/13060113684_ce1c5aef99_z.jpg

For my canoe build, I used the West epoxy system with their pumps. The pumps measure the proper ratio of 2 parts resin and 1 part hardener. I was hoping the pumps would fit the threads of my new Marine Epoxy, but they do not. I did spring for the pumps from Duckworks, but they are not measured for the 2:1 ratio; you need to remember how many squirts of each chemical you add (although I've seen where folks have added a PVC sleeve to limit the amount of travel for the hardener to 1/2 stroke). I know I will have many instances where I don't need a full squirt. Following Fredrick's ("Trango") advice, I bought a cheapo digital scale for $15 or so. This allows me to accurately and easily measure out miniature batches (like 15 grams) as needed. I think the scale will pay for itself pretty quickly.

http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7355/13059800075_89c1a17653_z.jpg

With the epoxy setting up solidly, I removed the clamps and scraped and planed off the excess. After cutting the king plank slot I went for the test fit:
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7443/13059796805_63d161c0d7_z.jpg



http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3594/13059920013_c5bd26c111_z.jpg

Sure hope that's right.

That reminds me. When I went to glue the stringer notch doublers and arch doubler in place, I thought I would go the "easy" route and pop a couple of brads in place with the air nailer to keep everything in alignment. I set the brad nailer for the lowest depth setting and tested it out on some scrap pieces. I wanted to be able to remove the brads after the glue set since they are not stainless steel. Well, the nail heads did protrude above the surface slightly, but when I tried to pull them out, they mostly broke off. I really didn't want to leave them in place, so I bashed away with a nail set to drive them from the opposite side. My "easy" solution left me with some ugly divots to fill, and took 5 times longer than if I had just used screws or normal nails. I'm glad most of my mistakes will be covered with paint!

MoMan
03-10-2014, 10:10 AM
I’m working on frame 2 and I believe I have screwed up … again.

As I look at the plans, the box at the top of the notes says “Frame #2 9mm ex.” I took that to mean that frame #2 was to be constructed of 9 mm plywood (and I’m still trying to figure out what “ex.” Means: Exterior plywood?? External measurement??).

But as I read down the instructions, it says that frame #2 is made from 12 mm pieces. I already made it from 9mm. If it should be 12mm, can I reinforce it? Or do I need to scrap it and start over with 12mm?

MoMan
03-10-2014, 09:48 PM
So I just confirmed that yes, I screwed up Frame #2. I made it out of 2 pieces of 9mm. It should be: Two pieces of 9mm for the top section, 12mm pieces for the sides and 12 mm for the bottom. So is this salvageable? Can I add reinforcing ply to the sides/bottom? Or do I need to scrap it and start over?

https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7431/13074597294_38c66d0aa2_z.jpg


https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3330/13074410473_4f7b05dc0a_z.jpg

andrewpatrol
03-11-2014, 02:26 AM
Mo(ment)man...as in wait a moment , I reckon you'd do yourself a big favour and STOP. Read the plans and instructions several times until you understand the process back to front.
Also if you have other things a stage or two in advance, already prepped, you can spend that left over epoxy on that. Cos even weighing it you'll have leftovers.
No offence intended.
I'm enjoying your build but.

Quest
03-11-2014, 04:11 AM
Moman,
I agree with Andrew. It is very hard when all you want to do is start cutting, but take a few days to read and re-read the plans. You will save yourself time, money and heartache.

Re the scales, if you spill epoxy like me then put the scales in an extra large clip seal bag. When you cannot read the display any more, turn the bag around and use the bottom as the top. When that is covered, just get a new one. But judging by how neat you have been so far, maybe it is just me that makes a mess.

Nice shots so far.

Mal

P.L.Lenihan
03-11-2014, 04:52 AM
Oh dear....all the tools and accessories and a gun ho spirit to boot but no bow shed and no helper.......it's going to a tough long haul.....


Best of success with this one Mike,ya lucky bugger and don't forget to keep up with the Texas thinking juice!!


Cheers!




Peter

Fitz
03-11-2014, 06:20 PM
Good to see you back at it MoMan! I plan to steal some of your organization tips. I need them, as you well know. I have a Texas sized shot of thinking juice to help. Also thanks to you!

Looking forward to your build.

Fitz

Rik van der Vaart
03-12-2014, 04:15 AM
Moman,
Where is the bottom?

BBSebens
03-12-2014, 06:14 AM
For my canoe build, I used the West epoxy system with their pumps. The pumps measure the proper ratio of 2 parts resin and 1 part hardener. I was hoping the pumps would fit the threads of my new Marine Epoxy, but they do not. I did spring for the pumps from Duckworks, but they are not measured for the 2:1 ratio; you need to remember how many squirts of each chemical you add

West System epoxy is 5:1, I do believe. Springing for the correct pumps will be a big help.

MoMan
03-12-2014, 09:06 AM
Turns out my frame #2 wasn’t quite the disaster I assumed. I convinced myself that I had used 9mm for the side/bottom piece instead of 12, but as I contemplated sawing off the side pieces to start over I checked the thickness: 9 for the top and 12 for the sides. Yea me. I still need to add the 9mm top doubler.

I realize that the pace of my postings suggests that I am charging out of the gate at full speed. The truth is, I built the jig in December and laid out frame #1 template in January. I believe it was February when I actually cut into the marine ply. So 3 months for one completed frame. The pix are pretty much caught up to current time.

I have been staring at the plans for at least 6 months and I have a copy of the build instructions on my work computer, which I read and reread frequently. Apparently it takes a lot of time for logic to penetrate all the layers of stoopid that envelop my brain. But these instrux aren’t the step-by-step cake recipe style of Ted Moore’s Canoe Craft. There are lots and lots of details left to the builder to interpret and figure out.

For example, the box of text next to frame 2 on the plans says “ex. 9mm ply” . But then directly below describes the pieces as being made from 12mm ply. Does that mean that if I build it from a single piece I can use 9mm instead of 12? I can’t find any explanation in the plans or the build instructions. I’m assuming that all of the frames are built using the same thickness of ply, but again, the plans specify 9mm but the parts list references 12mm.

I’m not complaining; just explaining why I struggle. If I wait to proceed until I understand everything, the build would never get started.

--Mike

Canoez
03-12-2014, 09:07 AM
Getting out my popcorn to watch this.

Oh, will Andy be helping? |;)

MoMan
03-12-2014, 09:27 AM
Good to see you back at it MoMan! I plan to steal some of your organization tips. I need them, as you well know. I have a Texas sized shot of thinking juice to help. Also thanks to you!

Looking forward to your build.

Fitz

Hey Fitz! Great to hear from you. Great to hear you are keeping hydrated.


Moman,
Where is the bottom?

Whoa Rik--The bottom is listed as step 13 on my build instrux! I know that the instructions don't necessarily need to be followed chronologically. I am using the build jig as my cutting bench for all the big pieces of ply. If I were to attach the bottom at this stage, I'm afraid I would accidentally cut through it. Besides, I need to make another trip to the lumber yard for some more ply. Cash is a little tight at the moment.


West System epoxy is 5:1, I do believe. Springing for the correct pumps will be a big help.

Well I hope you are wrong Ben! I used one pump of resin for each pump of hardener on the canoe, and it still seems to be intact. Looking at West Marine's website, they list a ratio of 3:1 by volume, or 3.5:1 by weight (so yes, my 2:1 ratio previously is incorrect). For the Marine Epoxy brand, they only offer the one size pump.

SeaB
03-13-2014, 01:30 PM
My guess on the the ply thickness is that ex. 9mm means that in an earlier set of plans the frames called for 9mm ( perhaps the study plans?) but the designer has since changed that to 12mm for some reason. In any case, if the cut list says 12mm that is what I would use. I think if he was OK ing 9mm ply the abbrev. would have been ext. 9mm

almeyer
03-13-2014, 08:42 PM
I had the pleasure of meeting John Welsford at Inks Lake (north and west of Austin) one year; he's a very easy person to talk to. If there's any question on the intent of the plans, shoot him an e-mail. Any advice he gives you will be golden.
Al

BBSebens
03-13-2014, 09:09 PM
Well I hope you are wrong Ben! I used one pump of resin for each pump of hardener on the canoe, and it still seems to be intact. Looking at West Marine's website, they list a ratio of 3:1 by volume, or 3.5:1 by weight (so yes, my 2:1 ratio previously is incorrect). For the Marine Epoxy brand, they only offer the one size pump.




For my canoe build, I used the West epoxy system with their pumps. The pumps measure the proper ratio of 2 parts resin and 1 part hardener. I was hoping the pumps would fit the threads of my new Marine Epoxy, but they do not. I did spring for the pumps from Duckworks, but they are not measured for the 2:1 ratio;

I think I see my confusion. West System Epoxy made by the Gougeon Brothers is a 5:1 epoxy. I have used it extensively. West Marine brand Marine Epoxy is not something that I have used myself.

Too many Wests


In any case, I'm glad to hear that your frame is correct. Keep plugging away. I rather like the Pathfinder.

MoMan
03-13-2014, 09:34 PM
Oh, will Andy be helping? |;)

Are you sure you want to open THAT Pandora's box?

MoMan
03-28-2014, 09:18 AM
Cautiously tiptoeing forward.

With the exception of the notches for the stringers along the turn of the bilge, frame 2 is complete. Before we get to that, I thought I would waste some of your time by documenting some other activities and projects that have been occupying my attention lately.

First up, the driveway. My house was built in 1965, and being relatively close to the coast, folks liked to include a lot of seashells in the concrete aggregate mix. Five decades later, a lot of that stuff is crumbling. A few years ago, one of my neighbors replaced their drive for $10k, definitely out of my budget. Recently, another neighbor approached a contractor about getting a deal if multiple properties went in. He quoted us $4.25/square foot to replace 1300s.f. 4" thick. With our cost was cut in half, I couldn’t pass it up. Between replacing our central HVAC system last spring and now this, our savings took a big hit, but we needed it all done. Anyway, the driveway work made getting into the workshop a challenge, so my time out there got a little truncated. At least that is the procrastination excuse I am publicizing for this week.

(before smoothing/floating was finished)
http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3695/13370560793_b1e718b47f_z.jpg




Two Saturdays ago was the Buffalo Bayou Regatta, billed as the largest canoe/kayak race in Texas. Something like 800 participants in 500 vessels for a 15 mile race. They start groups off in waves but the start is still a little chaotic as the bayou there is probably less than 50 feet wide. Saw a handful of capsizes but we successfully avoided a swim, and we weren’t competing. I only saw a couple other home built boats: a plywood canoe, a strip canoe and a strip kayak, so we got a lot of attention along the way.

http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2837/13370462685_0994762449_z.jpg


Post race party. Can you spot my Knotty Bits?
http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3666/13370617113_a355bf25d3_z.jpg
The race was originally called the Reeking Regatta and was started back in the 1960s to draw attention to the polluted waters. People would create amazing vessels from trash and recycled material to float down. Think art cars on the water. (some friends once created a Styrofoam “Gilligan’s Island” and dressed up as the characters). The ploy eventually worked; the bayou has been cleaned up considerably in recent years. This waterway is actually considered the birthplace of Houston (Allen’s Landing), as it is navigable as you get close to downtown. It eventually flows into the Houston ship channel and out to Galveston Bay. Right now, a section of its banks just west of downtown is undergoing a $55 million renovation and turning it into one of the city’s crown jewels. I’m very excited about the changes, especially since my office building overlooks part of it. Even better, the majority of the funding comes from private donors.


Now, back to boat building. I took Quest’s suggestion on protecting the scale. Thank you. I know I won’t be neat for long.
http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3712/13370572273_390c3972a8_z.jpg


I rough cut the 9mm doubler for the upper section of frame 2 and ran some drywall screws in to keep it aligned while the epoxy set. Then removed the screws and gave both surfaces a coat of plain epoxy, followed by a coat of epoxy/West 406 silica. Drive screws, apply light pressure with spring clamps and set overnight. After removing the screws the next day I used the router with trim bit to make it flush.

http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7272/13370545643_a3e5772f4a_z.jpg

MoMan
03-28-2014, 09:27 AM
A couple more nights of putzing around produced the support structure pieces for the floorboards and stem slot reinforcement pieces, all from douglas fir. After those were all screwed, epoxied and unscrewed, I got the ventilation and limber holes drilled out and the stringer notches cut. I also attached the temporary “bridge” piece to hold it when I eventually cut the stem slot.
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7030/13457895775_be910bf141_z.jpg


http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7252/13458273144_877bf02cae_z.jpg


Whenever I can, I prefer to avoid reading a measuring tape. I love using set up blocks and story sticks to mark things out, so I made a slot block to mark out my stringer slots and the slots for the kingplank. By cutting its length to equal the proper width of the kingplank, it is dual purpose. At least if I do screw up, the mistakes will all be consistent!

Stringer notch mode:
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7188/13458039003_de6e24a224_z.jpg
kingplank mode:
http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2805/13457914205_29eda85075_z.jpg

Today is payday so I need to make a trip to the lumber yard soon for more plywood. Because the lumber yard is a ways away, I prefer to take the freeway; but with thinner plywood on roof racks, you have to be careful with that high windage. I plan to get two sheets of 12mm, to act as a stiffening sandwich for the 9mm and 6mm sheets, a technique I’ve used before. I need to go on a Saturday morning as they are closed Saturday afternoons and Sundays, but tomorrow morning is our annual garage sale. I may have to go next week during my lunch hour; I just don’t like leaving that expensive ply on my roof racks out in the parking lot. All it takes is 20 seconds with a pickup truck and a sharp knife to slice through the cargo straps.

John How
03-28-2014, 09:32 AM
Hey Moman, it's a good start. I think if I had seen the pathfinder before I started my boat, I'd be building one too. Not that I am disappointed in what I chose, but I just like the way John engineers his boats for amateurs like me. I did in fact use some of his ideas that I coped from other welsford builds going on around for my Fulmar interior structure. Keep up the good work, we're watchin!

MoMan
03-28-2014, 11:05 AM
Thanks for dropping in John! Yes, I think most Welsford designs are ideal for amateurs like me.


Hey Moman, it's a good start. I think if I had seen the pathfinder before I started my boat, I'd be building one too. Not that I am disappointed in what I chose, but I just like the way John engineers his boats for amateurs like me. I did in fact use some of his ideas that I coped from other welsford builds going on around for my Fulmar interior structure. Keep up the good work, we're watchin!

MoMan
04-23-2014, 02:13 PM
Ahh the lumber yard, where neat stacks of rough-hewn 12/4 beams beckon me to daydream of huge, exotic projects I will never finish, let alone begin …

Back to reality, my budget allowed me a few sheets of Hydrotek: 1 sheet of 12 mm, 2 of 9mm and 2 6mm plus a few 8 and 9’ lengths of ¾” douglas fir. The bill was around $350. I loaded them onto the roof racks and cinched down the side straps. I worry about the wind working its way between the sheets, possibly snapping the thinner sheets as I get on the freeway, so I added hand screw clamps to the front edges, then ran more straps to the tow eyes under the front of my Outback, similar to how I secure my canoe. I addition to keeping the ply sheets clamped together, the clamps offer a visual check of what is going on up top while I’m driving; in this case, keeping my speed at a conservative 60 mph, everything was copacetic.

https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7134/13858300023_828be05fb3_z.jpg

In case there is anyone out there who doesn’t already know, when you have flat cargo straps like this which will be subject to wind, you can almost eliminate the annoying wind vibration by giving the straps a couple of twists, allowing the air to flow smoothly around them. I figure that besides the noise, that vibration is contributing to chafe and a shorter lifespan of my straps.
https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3798/13858253465_35627bcff3_z.jpg

Once safely in my driveway, I faced a new dilemma: finding room to store everything. My plywood storage space was already brimming, and my lumber racks were in disarray. So I set the horses up in the driveway and started hauling everything off the racks. For organization, I decided to lump together all the woods that, as far as I am aware, are usable for boat building: white oak, douglas fir, walnut, cherry, maple, western red cedar, basswood, and I can’t remember what else. Another shelf is all crappy southern yellow pine studs and planks, and yet another is filled with non-boat appropriate stuff like red oak, poplar, aromatic cedar, some antique pine, a few exotics, etc.

Then I pulled out the full and partial sheets of various plywood to make room for the new Hydrotek. I may just lay the miscellaneous sheets of CDX, foil-backed (roofing) and MDF flat on the build jig until I use enough Hydrotek to return them to the space behind the lumber rack.

My lumber rack is cheap, simple, robust and efficiently holds a ton of crap in a relatively small space. Can’t remember where I found the ridiculously simple plans on the internet a few years back, but you don’t need them. I angled some landscaping timbers about 10 degrees so nearly all of the weight is supported by the floor, not the wall. Heavy stuff low, light stuff above. They are affixed at the base with lag screws into a 4x4 post that is bolted into the concrete, and at the top, lagged into the top plate of my garage wall. For the racks themselves, I found some 1” (I think)x 18” solid steel bar stakes at Home Depot. They have a pointed end and some small holes that look like they might be for wire. Not sure what they are called, or even what they are for, but they were located next to the rebar in the concrete section. Holes in the landscape timbers are drilled at 90 degrees, giving the steel bars a 10 degree pitch back toward the wall. PVC sleeves keep the metal from staining my lumber. The rack spans about 12 feet or so.

https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5245/13858315263_5669f63c5a_z.jpg

The space behind holds several full sheets of ply. I decided that the a-frame space above that could be made to accommodate some partial sheets if they were long and narrow. That tall narrow bin at the far end holds shorter pieces—up to 3’ long, as well as some ply scraps that I can’t bring myself to throw out yet.

https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2917/13858275365_262deace62_z.jpg

But enough talk about lumber racks. Yes, my tinkering and head scratching continues to make incremental progress. I got frame 3 almost completely finished (I’ll cut the stem slots on all frames just before attaching them), and frame 4 is cut out and glued up with doublers fore and aft. I plan to cut the ventilation and limber holes tonight. Those arching eyebrows above the limber holes on frame 3 aren’t decorative.
https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7210/13845578385_ef6e13b27f_z.jpg
After cutting the limber holes, I realized that the holes were cartoonishly large (there isn’t a specific dimension on the plans; I took a measurement with the calipers, then rounded up to the nearest hole saw size I own = too big). So I fired up some epoxy and glued the plugs back in.

I received a couple of epoxy lessons lately too. A couple weeks back, my continuously-wandering mind apparently decided to take a little vacation while mixing up a double batch (4 shots resin, 2 hardener) of epoxy. I went through the normal routine and painted unthickened first, then added West 406 silica, then screwed and clamped things in place. The next day I was horrified to discover that the batch never kicked off: everything was still a gooey gelatinous mess. I guess my epoxy pumping was kinda like the Holy Hand Grenade scene from The Holy Grail: “One, Two, Four!” (“Three, Sir!”). I had to disassemble the doublers, scrape off the mess and scrub everything down with lacquer thinner until I couldn’t feel any stickiness.

My second lesson, illustrated for me on frame 4, also involved a double batch, but with the opposite problem: it set up too fast for the task at hand. I obviously need to get it out of the cup sooner; the cup was getting too hot to hold while I brushed on the unthickened portion, then solidified before I got the silica mixed. In fact, the reaction melted a small hole in the plastic cup. A wider mixing/storage container would likely help. So unless I am quickly pouring a big cupful over a larger surface area, I need to stick to single batches of 2 shots of resin and 1 shot of hardener. For my canoe I used West 206, which is a slow hardener. I reasoned that with Houston summer temps I would need the extra time. I am now using Marine Epoxy brand from DuckWorks with their “medium” hardener. I’m thinking of investing in a quart or two of slow hardener; it’s only gonna get hotter here.

MoMan
04-23-2014, 02:31 PM
With frame 4 glued up, I was getting more and more curious how this build would shape up in relation to my space. I cobbled together some hand screw clamps and positioned frames 1-4 along the stem and stepped back for a look. In a twist of irony, my boat announced, “You’re gonna need a bigger shop.”


https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7347/13885497103_b1ccd0df77_z.jpg



For once, my foresight has paid off! All I have to do is engage the appropriate wheels on each tool and re-engineer my workspace. But first I had to gather the fortitude required to collect and discard a sizeable pile of plywood and cutoff scraps, fighting the urge to keep yet more crap that is no longer useful or too small to safely machine. I am also going to unbolt my thickness planer from its splayed-leg stand. It takes up too much floor space. And so far, I really haven’t used the planer for this build. I can store it someplace out of the way, then set it on the table saw or workbench when needed.

So all in all, I’m pleased with my slow progress. Let’s see, what else was I going to tell you …

Oh yes. Please enjoy this comic strip I built. (It’s actually for my own entertainment. This is what happens when the left side of my brain gets off the leash. But if something gives you a chuckle, it would make my day to hear from you).


Getting out my popcorn to watch this.

Oh, will Andy be helping? |;)

https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3675/13459024223_ee2688f7e1_c.jpg

https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7398/13458883745_210f0e1192_c.jpg

https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3746/13459231524_8dd39439f4_c.jpg


https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7261/13459095054_a97ee23359_c.jpg

Rik van der Vaart
04-23-2014, 03:40 PM
Thanks for dropping in John! Yes, I think most Welsford designs are ideal for amateurs like me.

And me! Looking like a boat already! Nice shop, nice timbers, nice rack... Awesome boat!

John Meachen
04-23-2014, 05:06 PM
https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7134/13858300023_828be05fb3_z.jpg





A long time ago I was moving a few sheets of ply-mixture of 4mm and 6mm-on a roof rack and learned a useful lesson.At just over 35 mph the wind pressure bent the ply down blocking my view of the road ahead very thoroughly.I drove home slowly after that and on subsequent occasions I used two sections of an extending ladder longitudinally on the roof rack to prevent a recurrence of the experience.

MoMan
09-01-2014, 09:36 PM
I ain’t quit yet!

Contrary to rampant speculation, I’ve actually been carrying on, albeit very slowly. The oppressive Houston humidity is not at all motivating to go out to my uninsulated, non-airconditioned garage for more than a few minutes at a time. And to be honest, this whole boat building affair is really cutting in to my goofing off time.

There are bits and pieces to tend to everywhere: cutting ventilation holes in the stem, cutting notches for stringers, limber holes, slots for the stem, etc.


https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3899/14926456170_3d30ceefa9_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/oJZZoA)

The most visible progress has been the centerboard and the transom. I’m quite pleased with both, although I had a brief panic about the transom when I went looking at other builders’ pix online. I came across at least one where they had decided to reverse which side the boomkin went and on which side the engine extends through the hull/transom.

Shaping the c-board also had me concerned, but it turned out to be fairly easy, just time consuming. I was about to cut into my supply of hard maple for the hardwood laminations for the leading edge, I did a quick forum search and discovered an emphatic, “NOOOOO!” From what I found, it looks like maple is about as desirable as red oak in terms of rot resistance.

Here is the centerboard blank:
https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5591/15112471012_b0acc67235_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/p2rn83)

After gluing up the blank of douglas fir and white oak, I maneuvered the bulky piece onto the bandsaw, with the help of a roller stand, and trimmed it down to the designed outline. I marked it carefully to avoid doing something stupid like putting the leading edge on the d-fir.

Trimmed to outline
https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3898/15109851961_0482b23ae4_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/p2cWyZ)

I cut out the void for the lead ballast by plunge cutting with my skilsaw. With the foil template marked out and cut, I broke out an arsenal of portable power tools: power planer, grinder with backing pad, 6” orbital sander, belt sander, palm sander, etc. For me, I liked my 4” power planer to bring things down close to the lines quickly. I followed that with the 4” angle grinder and belt sander (36 grit) to fine tune the shape. It’s not perfectly aligned with the foil template, but it’s reasonably close.

https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5588/15112514522_96fd680991_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/p2rA4d)

https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5582/15112527082_e8aa2fb8d0_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/p2rDML)

https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3859/14926243540_3e252c00ea_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/oJYUby)

MoMan
09-01-2014, 09:48 PM
On the near horizon is melting the lead ingot for the centerboard ballast. Having read extensively about other builders melting lead, I’m not really nervous about it. My first hurdle – finding lead to melt – has already been taken care of. Not quite 2 years ago, I decided to tear out the shower of our master bath and was pleased to discover a lead-lined shower pan—how fortuitous! It weighs 64 lbs, and I only need 44 for the C-Board. I’ve decided to melt the lead shot in my ancient scuba weight belt. The belt fabric is deteriorating, and soon I will have a million lead beads scattering around the shop if I don’t do something, so that will be the first 15 or 20 lbs, then I’ll top it off with bits from the shower pan.

For some time, I have been planning to pour the molten lead directly into the c-board cavity, which I’ve seen others do successfully. But one thing bothers me: epoxy melts somewhere around 140F. The laminations are all affixed with epoxy and I don’t wish to compromise those joints, even if it is getting sheathed in ‘glass and more epoxy. Why tempt fate? I will pour an ingot and nail in place per the plans.

The transom is another personal triumph, except that I made it a touch thicker than the plans call for. No harm – she will have a buxom transom. Baby got back!

The planks glued up and cut out:
https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3844/14926284708_fbb5fcd4de_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/oJZ7qm)

I went with mahogany. My lumberyard (Clarks in the Heights) carries three species: Honduran, African and “genuine.” Not sure exactly the nuanced differences, but the sales person assured me that genuine mahogany is the most rot-resistant of the three. So I bought a couple of 4/4 pieces, along with some more doug fir.

https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3863/14926312878_7e588247ed_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/oJZfN3)
After drawing up and cutting out the transom template, I decided to reduce the arch a bit; the plan version looks a bit too rounded to my eyes. I picked out the most pleasing grain patterns and glued the planks all up. The uppermost joint gets covered by the oak doubler on the aft face, so there is only one joint showing.

White oak doubler on aft face (blue masking tape to control epoxy spread):
https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3885/14926201159_6c9eaabc39_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/oJYFzR)

Again, I puzzled for a few days over the minutia that comprises the transom, and finally settled on the details and glued the remaining pieces in place. It’s looking quite nice if I may say so.

Minutia attached to forward face:
https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3863/14926325418_fd06e725ea_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/oJZjwf)

MoMan
09-01-2014, 10:03 PM
In some other news, I got a burst of inspiration from, and got to meet in person, another forumite. Pete (“Epoxyboy”) from New Zealand was planning a business trip to visit an offshore oil platform off the coast of Louisiana, and managed to work in a Houston stopover to visit Space Center Houston, the visitor’s arm of NASA’s Johnson Space Center. We made contact through the forum and emails and arranged for him to join my wife and I for dinner one night. Pete built a cabin version of Pathfinder a number of years ago, and provided me with a treasure trove of build pictures which has helped me tremendously to visualize the plan instructions.
Here is his boat:
https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3864/14681224666_2bd5844e7b_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/onk7Bd)



The most recent issue of Small Craft Advisor has an article on building your own blocks. It looks fairly simple, so I decided to take a crack at it. I located an old broken block and beat the pin out to free the sheave. My scraps of leftover 4/4 mahogany is just thick enough for a small single block. My first attempt turned out better looking than I expected, so I may give it a go. My real challenge right now is the marlinspike skills, as you can see. Mind you, I threw this together in a rush. The article’s author mentioned he had trouble finding brass rings and made his own from some brass tubing. I tried the same technique with copper, and the results were less than satisfying. But, I see Duckworks carries a variety of sheaves, thimbles and rings that should do the trick. Now, I need to practice making splices and whipping ends.
https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3863/14926176979_3e1d7a44ff_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/oJYyoX)

















... and to continue our lame little tale ...




https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2924/13459184254_5ca23ceed3_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/mvkQyW)

https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7015/13459165614_3f05d2d9a8_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/mvkK2y)


https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7454/13459148884_1445a3ed39_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/mvkE47)

https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7400/13458771665_9c53a0b7cf_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/mviHVk)


--Mike

MoMan
09-03-2014, 10:10 PM
I'm pretty disappointed in my expensive Hydrotek plywood. BS 1088? I call B.S.
[IMG]https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3858/14947484000_1e50f66d11_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/oLRLeo)


I started working on the centercase sides tonight and for the second time, cutting into the middle of a (different) sheet of 9mm I find a big patch of delamination. WTF??

Here's how I fixed the first one:
[IMG]https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5568/14947386739_01b1fea6c5_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/oLRgjt)

And now I need to do the same for this one:
[IMG]https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3891/14947357510_ce65fe66ee_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/oLR7Cw)

How many more voids are lurking where I haven't cut? And will those places promote rot? I guess only time will tell.

--Mike

ahamaywine
09-04-2014, 09:08 AM
Rough. Have you considered calling for a refund or replacement?

MoMan
09-04-2014, 10:08 AM
Rough. Have you considered calling for a refund or replacement?
Yes, I've thought about it, but the hassle of loading up the faulty sheet on my roof racks, driving across town and back (at 35mph to avoid disaster) with a new sheet and recutting the piece I already carefully laid out is probably worse than dumping a batch of epoxy down the crack and clamping it overnight. I will definitely let my otherwise quality lumberyard know about my displeasure so they can pass it along to their supplier. Maybe they will switch brands.

Ed Armstrong
09-04-2014, 11:07 AM
I found some voids on the Hydrotek I used for my Wee Rob, but most were small (<1/8"). I wasn't very happy about it either. Guess there's a reason Hydrotek is cheaper than Okoume.

cracked lid
09-04-2014, 02:40 PM
I used 8 sheets of Hydrotek on my recently completed build. It had a different stamp than yours, so I'm sure it was from a different supplies. Never saw a single void. It was a lot cheaper than Okoume. Also heavier.

floatingkiwi
09-05-2014, 12:50 PM
I wouldnt use that sheet with the voids in it. I would think about it continuously. The thought of it being unattached to itself would drive me to more beer. Actually, not a bad th.......keep it.

MoMan
09-05-2014, 01:23 PM
How was Port Townsend?

I'm guessing you mean the plyWooden Boat Festival in Port Aransas, TX; I haven't (yet) made it to Port Townsend. It won't happen until Oct. 17-19. I've reserved my spot for a 2-day course with J.W. himself and I can't wait!

MoMan
09-15-2014, 09:24 AM
It’s been a couple of pretty good weeks as far as boat progress is concerned. I placed an order with McMaster-Carr for a host of stainless steel fasteners and raw materials for the centerboard and CB case. I got the lifting strap for the CB cut, ground down and bolt holes drilled. From there, I over drilled the holes in the top of the CB. Actually, first I needed to trim down the portion of the top of the CB to accommodate the lifting strap and bolts. So after drilling the bolt holes a couple sizes larger than the finished size, I filled with thickened epoxy and set it aside to cure.

For the CB case, I marked out the outline on some 1/8” door skin. On the plans, it says to make the bottom about 10mm longer, which will be trimmed later when the hull is flipped. But it wasn’t clear (to me) on the plans that the 10mm was already added or if I needed to add it to the plan measurements. I finally decided that the excess was already included and proceeded to trace the outline onto my 9mm ply. I left the cuts wide of the line as the plans recommend cutting the sides together to make sure they are identical. So I screwed them together to trim them down to final size.

The spacers call for 70mm x 40mm hardwood. I’ve had a nice long plank of cherry, 8/4 x 6 or 8 inches wide, sitting on my lumber racks for a couple of years, Can’t remember what I bought it for but it was perfect for the spacers.

Also on my to-do list was preparation for the CB lead ballast. I had an edge on other builders regarding lead sourcing: a lead-lined shower pan that was installed in 1965 when my house was built. About 2 years ago, we decided to rip out our master shower and rebuild it. I was pleasantly surprised to find the shower pan, which came out to 64 lbs. But I also had an ancient scuba diving weight belt from my high school days. It was a fabric belt filled with lead shot, but the fabric was wearing out, threatening me with a shop full of tiny pellets of lead rolling everywhere, so I decided to use the 20 lbs of shot first and supplement it with the shower plan lead.

I also needed a pot to melt it in. Goodwill had a nice, sturdy one, just what I needed for $4.99.
https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5595/15224344301_55d4a8e3c5_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/pcjK9R)



I screwed together a mold using 2x4 pine and some scrap ¾” ply.
https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3862/15227435925_e7fbba6233_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/pcAAbH)



I lined it with heavy duty aluminum foil to prevent anything from leaking.
https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3881/15227068222_b4c80b04b9_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/pcyGT1)

The forecast called for rain Saturday, so that killed any thoughts of molten metal work.

MoMan
09-15-2014, 09:32 AM
Instead, I dragged my 2 sheets of 12mm Hydrotek out from behind the lumber rack. These will become the bottom. I noticed a different label on this ply. I’m really hoping it is better than the fuji brand I’ve had trouble with. The print quality of the logo is perhaps an indicator of quality, fingers crossed.
https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5591/15227059232_06171ebe22_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/pcyEd1)

Plans call for a 6:1 scarf, so I marked them up and aligned them.
https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3896/15040657409_a9fa8f897e_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/oV6irt)


Last week I experimented with scarfing some scraps of ply. It didn’t go that great. I built a scarfing jig for circular saws from a kayak building website. The problem is that the jig appears designed for ¼” ply. My blade didn’t have enough depth to reach far enough, so I abandoned that approach. I also toyed with the angle grinder and an aggressive 36 grit disc, which worked OK but didn’t fill me with confidence. Once I had the 2 sheets lined up I decided that my power plane would be ideal. It turned out super easy! I cut it down about 90%, then hit it with the belt sander and a couple of high spots with the block plane. I was very pleased.
https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3920/15040855368_213816fa40_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/oV7jhy)


A nephew’s birthday party obliged me to set it aside for the afternoon before epoxying it, but that got done as soon as I got home. Others have recommended hollowing out a shallow trough to prevent squeezing all the glue out, so I ran the grinder over one side lightly—just enough to produce a gap visible beneath the straight edge. Neat epoxy on both sides followed by thickened epoxy on one surface. A two by four and some weights helped push the surfaces together enough to produce a nice, small line of squeeze out. Leave it to cook overnight.
https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3868/15227441235_57465afc15_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/pcABLg)
And yes, the little tear on the left hand piece got fixed with epoxy.

MoMan
09-15-2014, 09:49 AM
Sunday morning after walking the dogs, I started gathering all the equipment and tools needed for the big melt. Propane tank, fire extinguisher, pot, lead, strainer for slag, leather gloves, C-clamps, pliers and so-forth. The shower pan lead has a lot of crap stuck to it, I guess I could have spent some time brushing it off, but I figured it would be just easier to scoop it off once it separated from the molten metal. I put on my cotton duck canvas overalls, leather boots, a cotton sweatshirt and my face shield before the pour.
https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3899/15053451730_1d49673ac2_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/oWdSKd)

https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5555/15240137375_1ed0cfeb48_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/pdHFTe)


Everything went well—much smoother than I expected. I scooped quite a bit of the debris out and dropped it into an empty metal paint bucket. After the pour, I shut the burner down, breathed a sigh of relief and relaxed while the brick cooled.

https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3874/15237051241_1508bed61a_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/pdrSu2)


That was when I got hit with a surprise: the brick weighed in at 29.5 lbs. What the hey? I know I measured the raw lead the day before at 45 lbs,; plans call for 20 kilos (about 44 lbs). Then I weighed the bucket with the slag: 15 lbs. Mystery solved. The slag itself didn’t weigh more than a pound, but as I scooped it out, some lead came with it. I just didn’t think it was that much.


https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3919/15053582268_97582d50f8_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/oWexxS)

So I needed to repeat my process, remelt the stuff that came with the slag (after separating as much as possible) and add a couple more pounds of shower pan. To help make it stick to the existing brick, I drilled three 3/8” holes.
https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5562/15237069121_ea01a1c8b6_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/pdrXNi)


After scooping out the crap again, but before pouring, I got a propane torch to heat up the surface of the original brick. I decided not to line the mold with foil this time. If the wood ignites, who cares? It’s scrap wood and I have an extinguisher handy in case. The second pour went just as smoothly. No flames, minimal slag. I was happy.

https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5579/15053589348_af1bcb2bb4_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/oWezDW)


If I were to do it again (and I believe I will be when I get the kick up rudder cut and shaped), I would not bother with lining the mold with foil. Leaking was minimal and those leaks sealed themselves as soon as the liquid metal cooled even a little.

MoMan
09-15-2014, 09:52 AM
It would be greedy of me to ask for a better fit in the slot I cut out of the CB. Just a little shaving on each end and it slid right into place.
https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3899/15053472490_429c175d6d_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/oWdYV9)


The biggest problem I had with the lead was drilling pilot holes for the screws that hold it in place in the wooden CB while I add epoxy. These were fairly small holes (1/8”, 9/64”). I snapped off 2 drill bits. I thought lead would be super easy to drill, but as the bit started to dig in, the flutes grabbed the lead and started to self-feed until it stalled out. By then, the bit was stuck: couldn’t go forward or backwards. There was so much torque that the chuck lost its grip. I even used some metal cutting lube, which helped minimally. So what is the secret to successful drilling in lead? I resorted to backing the bit out frequently; as soon as I felt it dig in, I pulled it out. It took awhile but I got 4 holes drilled, then drove in some stainless screws into the surrounding wood.

I mixed up a batch of epoxy, thickened it and worked it into the small gaps around the lead brick.
https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5583/15054997508_b03821cb83_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/oWmNfy)



I let that cure for a few hours, then mixed up another epoxy batch; this time with the microlite fairing stuff (West 410). I spread it out with a plastic epoxy squeegee and left it to cure. I let it sit for a couple of hours, then went back and shaved down the high points with a rasp and a micro shaver file before it got too hard. Tomorrow I will hit it with the block plane. Maybe. I’m still a little worried about hitting those drill bits that are forever entombed. Maybe I will just wait until it is fully cured and hit it with the grinder/belt sander.
https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5551/15055000187_ca3b2dc213_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/oWmP3K)



My next order from DuckWorks should be here tomorrow. It has a quart of slow hardener to deal with the Texas heat, and some fiberglass cloth to cover the interior sides of the CB case as well as the CB itself.

ahamaywine
09-15-2014, 02:08 PM
Super low RPMs and a train engine worth of torque. I've heard it's better to pound a hole with an awl nail... thoughts?

ahamaywine
09-15-2014, 03:05 PM
Super low RPMs and a train engine worth of torque. I've heard it's better to pound a hole with an awl nail... thoughts?

Drilling will melt the lead right onto the bit with high RPMs.

Rik van der Vaart
09-15-2014, 07:29 PM
No lead mecessary for rudder. It has downhaul on plans... U may want to make some lead ingots for ballast later. Good job on pour.

ulav8r
09-15-2014, 08:55 PM
For drilling in lead or brass, the cutting edge should be stoned so the cutting edge is 90 degrees to the surface being cut. A small flat (.003-.006") is sufficient to stop self feeding.

cracked lid
09-15-2014, 10:10 PM
That looks like the same meranti ply that I used. I never saw a hint of a void or area of delam. It does splinter, so plan for that with the way you make your cuts.

MoMan
09-17-2014, 09:32 PM
That went better than I expected.

It seems to be a recurring theme, which I’m quite happy to sustain for as long as fate smiles on me. First, when I ordered my fiberglass cloth, I just winged it as for how much I would need. I ordered 3 yards of 50” wide, 6oz cloth. After glassing the interior sides of the CB case and the CB itself, I have very little left over. I knew I wouldn’t have enough for the bottom panel, but I thought I was getting much more than needed for these three pieces. The glassing itself turned out well too.

The now-scarfed ply for the bottom panel is on the build jig, but not yet cut to size, so I covered it with some plastic to prevent an epoxy disaster and laid out the two sides, inside out. I spread my glass cloth over them and cut away the excess. Spreading epoxy on these pieces was a breeze because they are laying horizontal.




https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3840/15250595776_73abd74baa_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/peDhNu)https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3921/15270474221_588a766a34_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/pgpaYi)


For the CB, I thought about approaching it one side at a time, laying it horizontal on the tarp-covered bottom panels and letting it set up overnight. I decided to give it a shot propping it up vertically. I positioned the blunt, leading edge facing up, with the narrow, more vulnerable edge resting on some PVC. From my experience glassing my cedar-strip canoe, I didn’t think the cloth would stick, considering the tapered edges meant the cloth would have to overcome that gravitational pull.

I used wooden clothing pins and some mini spring clamps to hold the cloth in position while I slathered epoxy on.
https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3876/15086863569_d3d5c3b4b2_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/oZb7Vp)

https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3869/15086904260_a9c565e2c4_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/oZbk1Y)

With the first side sticking nicely, even along the tapered edge, I went ahead with the second side. No real issues there either. I kept an eye on it for awhile to make sure it stuck until the epoxy started to kick off.

https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3895/15270502381_1e75fa811a_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/pgpjkP)

Tomorrow I will add two additional layers of glass to the leading edge.

--Mike

MoMan
09-21-2014, 09:23 PM
My momentum is refreshing … to me at least. I continued farting around with the centerboard, adding the extra layers of glass on the leading edge, excavating and filling bubbles, filing off sharp edges, etc. I will let it sit for another week before hitting it with the power sander for final sanding/paint prep. Also drilled the final sized holes for the lifting hardware and the oversize hole for the pivot pin.

Since I’m paranoid, I have not done a final CB case assembly yet. I’m happy with the way the CB fits, but I want to make sure the 20X45mm support pieces that attach to the exterior of the CB case side panels are properly placed. Plans call for these pieces, as well as the CB case logs, to be screwed from inside, so if I screw them up it will be a real hassle to fix.

On Saturday I set about drawing out the bottom panel shape. Trimmed it rough with the jig saw, hit the high spots with the block plane/jack plane and finally the longboard hand sander.

https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5592/15128558697_fa83aa8227_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/p3RPqV)

After that I cut out the CB slot. The angle grinder was perfect for quickly fine tuning the slot to fit the CB case.
https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3846/15128350019_c5d448247e_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/p3QKp2)
To maintain a straight line, I set a long steel ruler just outside the cutting area as a visual go by.

Today (Sunday) I worked on cutting out the profiles and attaching them to the cross piece supports. Temptation was too much to bear so I clamped on the profiles then clamped the frames, stem, CB case and transom.
https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3846/15128390490_859478a316_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/p3QXqN)
They are in the right sequence, but not the proper spacing. And at least one of them (frame 6?) was supposed to be built in 2 pieces, but I didn’t catch that until I had glued it all together as one piece. No harm done.

https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3868/15311942041_d83cbd696b_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/pk4GUH)

--Mike

MoMan
09-21-2014, 09:30 PM
And since it's practically Monday, what do you say to killing a little time?

https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3913/15056626379_5287ffe39c_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/oWv9sx)

https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3857/15056617459_2bd4e688c2_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/oWv6NK)

https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5565/15056795337_48602baef4_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/oWw1FB)

https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3866/15056788078_28ce733354_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/oWvYws)

https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3920/15243337975_8ba17e030e_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/pe16iZ)

Happy Monday everyone.

Rik van der Vaart
09-21-2014, 09:56 PM
Mike, double check the forward support piece on the cb case. It should be parrallel to aft one. I remember i had some issues with it also.

MoMan
09-21-2014, 10:01 PM
Thanks Rik-- Yes, I will be double checking a lot of things before the epoxy gets mixed.

HoangK
09-22-2014, 12:52 AM
And since it's practically Monday, what do you say to killing a little time?

https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3913/15056626379_5287ffe39c_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/oWv9sx)

https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3857/15056617459_2bd4e688c2_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/oWv6NK)

https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5565/15056795337_48602baef4_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/oWw1FB)

https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3866/15056788078_28ce733354_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/oWvYws)

https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3920/15243337975_8ba17e030e_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/pe16iZ)

Happy Monday everyone.


LOL!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

MoMan
09-22-2014, 06:45 AM
Hey Pete-- Yes, that is pretty much my plan. With the profiles close to where they will eventually be, I want to let the big bottom panel relax itself to help with the curve. Then affix them to the jig, affix bottom to profiles and dry fit the frames.


If you dry fit the frames that mate up to the case, you can mark exactly where the tops of both ends of the support pieces actually need to be on the case.
You really want the bottom panel set to the correct curve when you this though, and have the case and frames screwed down to it.
Damn near horizontal hail here this morning had me wishing for some of that Texas heat!

Pete

MoMan
09-22-2014, 06:46 AM
LOL!

Thanks HoangK! Lots more adventures ahead.

Duckworks
09-22-2014, 01:17 PM
There are still a few places left both in Port A and Oklahoma for classes with John Welsford:

http://www.duckworksbbs.com/classes/welsford/index.htm

MoMan
09-25-2014, 10:35 PM
Mike, double check the forward support piece on the cb case. It should be parrallel to aft one. I remember i had some issues with it also.


If you dry fit the frames that mate up to the case, you can mark exactly where the tops of both ends of the support pieces actually need to be on the case.
You really want the bottom panel set to the correct curve when you this though, and have the case and frames screwed down to it.
Damn near horizontal hail here this morning had me wishing for some of that Texas heat!

Pete

Hey Rik and Pete-- Does this look better?
https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2949/15169569550_046029af9e_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/p7u1wA)
Of course you were both correct.

Not sure how I got that far off, but on the plans, those pieces definitely do not look parallel. Still need to add the doubler that reinforces the pivot hole, then glue up the case. Anyway, after messing around with profiles and crosspieces, redoing them two or three times, etc., tonight I finally screwed the bottom panel to the profiles. When I dropped the case into the slot, I was a little surprised to see a gap; previously it had fit like a glove.
https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3888/15169573760_dd4b48c38b_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/p7u2Mb)

I took it out and discovered the problem: When I glued the case logs, I didn't bother to clean up the thick bead of squeezed out epoxy. The router took care of 80% of that, and a chisel cleaned up the rest. It still doesn't fit perfectly, so I will need to do a little fine tuning.

Incidentally, is there a piece of some sort that goes between frame 5 and the CB case [shown above]? Maybe a plywood doubler? The gap doesn't look right, but I didn't see anything on the plan.


--Mike

Rik van der Vaart
09-25-2014, 11:42 PM
I thought that doubler faces forward... Wait and let me check...

http://pathfinderriksbuild.blogspot.com/2012/09/i-just-had-to-put-it-all-together.html

That is the link with some pics of my build. The frame goes smack flat against the cb case, glue and screw. Doublers will be added such that they touch the doublers of the cb case. Nothing between the frame and the case. Pic in my blog is of dry fit without doublers.

MoMan
09-26-2014, 07:44 AM
Aha! I scared myself into thinking I built it wrong but I believe I got it right; when I put the horizontal doublers on, I figured it would be easier to attach them as a single piece and cut the center portions away later. It's now later.

https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3844/15172364170_dc8e7599ed_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/p7JkgG)
Onward!

MoMan
09-26-2014, 10:08 PM
After dry fitting the CB case, it was a hop, skip and a jump to start assembling the pieces of the puzzle. There are still a few doublers to add here and there, but it looks beautiful to my untrained eye.

[IMG]https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3894/15178497778_4610a38f89_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/p8gLzy)

[IMG]https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2948/15178321119_e2440c27f2_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/p8fS4H)

[IMG]https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2944/15365077255_f8bcc70d45_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/ppL3a6)

[IMG]https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2941/15361894061_e6c7d8fa79_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/pptHUr)

[IMG]https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3865/15314770092_18087bcfeb_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/pkjcAd)i (https://flic.kr/p/pkjcAd)

Rik van der Vaart
09-27-2014, 07:32 PM
Looks purty nice to me!

A couple of frames need a deeper fit but you know that. Good luck with the 20x70 doubler on the bottom...

epoxyboy
09-27-2014, 10:08 PM
Looks purty nice to me!

A couple of frames need a deeper fit but you know that. Good luck with the 20x70 doubler on the bottom...
Looking good Mike. I had to rip the bottom stringer into two 20x35's, glue and screw the first half, and laminate the outer half in-situ. There was no way in hell the timber i was using was going to go around in one piece.
I think I mentioned that if you lay those half on, half off the bottom panel, you end up chopping and chiselling an awful lot of it off as it gets close to the bow on account of the angle that the first plank meets the bottom panel. It is a rolling bevel, so the angle changes continuously, but it should be possible to save a lot of work by pulling the bottom stringer closer to the centre line as it approaches the bow. Draw out the cross section of the first plank meeting the bottom panel, and you'll probably see it better than my crap explanation.
First time you wrap a couple of pretend stringers around the sheer, you'll go wow, its BIG, especially in the confines of you shop |;)


Pete

Wolfman
09-28-2014, 03:33 AM
Great Thread! This is one of the boats that I am trying to figure out which of to build so following along is very helpful. Besides the cartoons are GREAT! Mass Grave! LMAO!!

Also nice work in getting the shop organized I know that is very helpful on any build. Oh, and the metal "Bars" that you used for the lumber rack, those are "forming stakes" the small holes are for dbl headed forming nails. Usually they are about 3/4" thick. Nice job with the PVC pipe, I build something like that on the outside of my garage and used #6 rebar (also 3/4) but all the stuff is just sitting on the metal. Although there is no wood out there, just stuff like pipes and metal studs and other things that can stand the weather.


Wolfgang

PGMenegaz
10-03-2014, 07:43 AM
Hi MoMan, Wow excited to see another pathfinder build in Houston. I completed mine 4 yrs ago. I sail mostly in Galveston Bay. My boat will be at the plywood boat festival in Port Aransas on Oct 17th. If you are going please look for me.

MoMan
10-09-2014, 08:43 AM
I accidentally left on the beer magnet feature on my LPBC and wound up at Oktoberfest in Munich.
https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3951/15297222957_c24d3a336d_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/piLgrp)

https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3940/15296988500_35889657ff_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/piK4K3)

https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5605/15297139937_e85f5e5fa3_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/piKQL2)

https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3931/15297057848_1ebf06d1b3_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/piKqmG)

It was a never-ending river of cleavage -- compliments of dozens of delicious damsels adorned in delightful dirndls -- and beer, all served up in enticingly displayed 0.5 and 1 liter containers ... if you're into that sort of thing.

My wife and I took a little trip to Germany and the Netherlands to celebrate the end of my 40s: I turned 50 on Tuesday, most of which was spent on a plane. Since we were traveling west, it ended up being the longest birthday of my life. Great trip but good to be back home and back to our routine. The dogs were especially ecstatic to be back and pooping in their own yard.

We spent a couple days at the Fest, a day at the Dachau concentration camp, , a visit to the Deutches Museum (science and technology) a day at Nymphenburg palace then on to Amsterdam where we rented a houseboat on the Amstel canal. From there we made it to Den Haag (The Hague) and Delft.

This was the view from our "porch"
https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3932/15270433159_82eddd7321_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/pgoXLk)

Our home (white hull stripe) for a few days:
https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3932/15270622437_a643ed2b29_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/pgpW2K)
It's a 1928 freighter, converted to living quarters in the 1980s. That's about all I know.

But I’m back and ready to return to some boat work.




Great Thread! This is one of the boats that I am trying to figure out which of to build so following along is very helpful. Besides the cartoons are GREAT! Mass Grave! LMAO!!

Also nice work in getting the shop organized I know that is very helpful on any build. Oh, and the metal "Bars" that you used for the lumber rack, those are "forming stakes" the small holes are for dbl headed forming nails. Usually they are about 3/4" thick. Nice job with the PVC pipe, I build something like that on the outside of my garage and used #6 rebar (also 3/4) but all the stuff is just sitting on the metal. Although there is no wood out there, just stuff like pipes and metal studs and other things that can stand the weather.


Wolfgang

Wolfgang-- Great to have you aboard! I'm glad you are enjoying my corny sense of humor. Lots more adventures to come!

MoMan
10-09-2014, 08:46 AM
Hi MoMan, Wow excited to see another pathfinder build in Houston. I completed mine 4 yrs ago. I sail mostly in Galveston Bay. My boat will be at the plywood boat festival in Port Aransas on Oct 17th. If you are going please look for me.

YESS! I can't wait to meet you and view your boat. I assume you will be taking me for a sail--I'll supply the beer. I'm driving down Wednesday evening with my cedar strip canoe. I'm registered for the 2-day class with Mr. Welsford. Very excited.

--Mike

MoMan
10-09-2014, 09:01 AM
Here are a few more pics of our trip, because you have nothing better to do right now than surf the 'net.

Sorry that I can't offer you much info about the vessels in these pix. I have to be mindful of how much boat exposure I subject my wife to, or she gives me the "are we almost done with this Home Depot shopping trip" look.

https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3927/15226566329_aa7199c570_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/pcw8FF)

The cutaway part was really cool:
https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3928/15410135671_f31779b81f_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/ptJYsk)

Note the shoe on the foredeck. Not sure of the story behind that.
https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2947/15226778207_5c843d80e0_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/pcxdEK)


I think this is an early Klepper folding canoe.
https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2949/15226638930_dddbb7553b_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/pcwvgq)

https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2942/15410115711_7d949c4e8d_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/ptJSwc)

https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3931/15226758427_6df3b744f9_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/pcx7MH)

MoMan
10-09-2014, 09:18 AM
I even managed to locate a wooden rowboat at Oktoberfest!
https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3928/15225313269_6429c3b2f0_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/pcpHcc)

It was associated with the fish on a stick tent. Not kidding:
https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2947/15296826509_d062c4b423_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/piJeA6)



Our houseboat location was a bit insane at times--especially Saturday afternoon. It was a non-stop parade of boats, mostly tourist boats, flowing past our deck.
https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2950/15270583517_0869768332_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/pgpJsH)
I started to feel like an animal at the zoo, with all those tourists gawking at us. I wonder how many pictures we ended up in?


Here are a couple of views of our interior:
https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2949/15270551967_a70b2ea23c_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/pgpz5K)
There is a tiny v-berth at the far end of this view, looking forward. Just right for kids.

Hallway with companionway stairs at the end
https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2945/15270595057_9180d342e4_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/pgpMTF)
Master suite is the open door. Really just a queen size bed and a small closet.

The helm
https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3930/15270374659_23987976d3_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/pgoEnH)

MoMan
10-09-2014, 09:33 AM
1972 Olympic site
https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3927/15422533012_811184f64d_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/puQvKA)

We tried on, and bought, a dirndl and lederhosen at the central Munich train station! Better trust the lady holding up the curtain:

https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2949/15412101655_90a9a51b81_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/ptV3SB)

https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3930/15411785332_3753df1041_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/ptTqQL)


https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3941/15297066508_2f02dc7d35_z.jpg

The M.C. Escher Museum--those staircases are TRICKY!
https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3937/15297064617_1b7496a714_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/piKsnp)

https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2949/15270558638_ecff0b253f_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/pgpB4L)

--Mike

PGMenegaz
10-09-2014, 10:01 AM
Excellent! I will be there Friday at 9:00 am as that is when it is available for us to Rig and put in. I reserved a slip, so look for me tied up on the dock somewhere. I was hoping you were game for a sail, Duckworks just provided me with a larger Jib (150%) and I can't wait to give it a go. BTW I also am a big fan of Shiner so seems we have a lot in common. Cheers!

Rik van der Vaart
10-11-2014, 02:32 PM
Nice report Mike, thanks. Hope you had a good time in the Netherlands. Lots of wooden boats there...

MoMan
10-13-2014, 10:14 PM
I spent the entire weekend putzing around with the centerboard case: getting the bunk support pieces in place, screwed in from the interior, waterproofing the interior, final assembly w/ epoxy, trimming the case logs to fit the bottom panel, adding the pivot pin doublers, etc. And yet, it looks like I didn’t do much of anything. Oh well, one step at a time.

https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3934/15531617415_2db260e509_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/pEtAKa)


https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3945/14910846024_b5c71fcfde_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/oHBZ39)


I felt it wouldn’t hurt anything to add some 6oz. cloth w/ epoxy to help reinforce my scarf joint, just because I’m paranoid. The glass reaches from the CB case logs out to the bottom panel edge.
https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3950/14910863304_df27ef34bd_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/oHC5b5)


Question for other PF builders: In fitting frame 5, at the aft end of the CB case, the frame is not absolutely square to the bottom panel. Given that the bottom panel has some rocker, I assume this isn't an issue but wanted to check anyway:
https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3943/15532459142_41f64a8678_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/pExUXG)

Another question for the group: What do you use for squeeze bottles for epoxy? I use the pumps for most batches, but for smaller batches, which I measure out on a digital kitchen scale. I bought these plastic bottles from Rockler, but they absolutely suck: as soon as I apply a little pressure, the resin/hardner breaches the crappy, shallow threads and oozes down the sides, creating a perpetual sticky mess. I even made a little caddy to help contain the mess.
https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5608/15345465358_7f75025f91_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/po2wdW)
So what works for you? Mustard and ketchup bottles? Perhaps I should dump out the wife's shampoo bottles. She may not like that.

MoMan
10-13-2014, 10:25 PM
I also worked on finishing up the centerboard. I hadn’t touched it since I added the glass cloth. So I hit it with the 5” sander w/ 60 grit. I was assuming I would need to do some final fairing to hide the cloth weave, but after sanding it looks fine and ready for paint as is. I also added some threaded rod above and below the pivot pin, epoxied in place. It appears these are to reduce chances of cracking. My 12" long aircraft drill bits came in handy.

https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3947/15507903626_7188b08386_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/pCo4sJ)


https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3952/14911430853_8aea88038e_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/oHEYTp)

The plyWooden boat festival is this weekend in Port Aransas, near Corpus Christi. I'm taking my cedar strip canoe along with my PF plans as John W. is scheduled to be there. I'm signed up for his class, so I hope to ask him some questions about the plans.


--Mike

MoMan
10-31-2014, 12:46 PM
Time for an update. I’ve been slowly moving forward, literally and figuratively frame by frame. At the plyWooden Boat Fest, I got the opportunity to talk with J.W. about the plans and he cleared up a couple of questions for me. Perhaps the biggest benefit to me was self confidence. I know now that I don’t have to fret over a few mms here or there, and if I do screw up, most everything can be fixed without scrapping the project.

So when I got home, I had the confidence to start attaching pieces to the bottom panel. I started with the CB case. Of course with the CB case, it is glued with 5200, which is the equivalent of putting a ring on the girl’s finger. Going through a separation with that stuff is going to be messy, difficult and potentially expensive, whereas epoxy can be warmed up with a heat gun and scraped off.

https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3946/15614032796_5af6fd764c_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/pMKZY1)

After inserting the centerboard, I heaved the mass onto the bottom panel and loaded it with 5200, starting with a thick bead that went right into the bottom corners. I continued slathering the undersides of the case logs and the matching surface of the bottom panel, then dropped the whole affair into the tight-fitting slot. From underneath, I drove in the stainless steel screws to cinch everything up, which produced a nice bead of white squeezeout.

https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5598/15017583313_1382a3e296_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/oT43je)

I fretted about getting the case absolutely square to the bottom, moving from one side to the other with a framing square, and I got it to within a couple of mm. I decided to let that cure for a couple of days before attaching frame 5. I had a couple of concerns: one, I did not yet have the chine stringer on, and that would be a hassle to work around the F5 notches. Two, with the 5200 all goopy, I worried about dragging the frame into that adhesive and compromising the seal. From all my reading, the CB area is the most vulnerable area for leaks. Checking everything the next day, it all stayed square.

Next task was to tackle the chine stringer. A few days prior, just for kicks, and knowing that it was an impossible task, I put a piece of 20X45mm doug fir into the stringer notches of the dry-fitted frames. As I got to the bow section, where the harshest bend is, I took a beefy bar clamp and started wrenching it toward the stem. CRACK!!! No surprise there. I followed the course that others before me had already discovered and set about laminating 2 pieces in situ. I went with 20x20, and it bent easily. Starting on the starboard side, I used some plywood blocks screwed to the bottom panel where the notches would be located to hold the correct curve. Between the slippery epoxy and clamping the two long, unwieldy pieces to the curvature it was more wrestling than I cared for. On the port side, I did them one at a time. After everything cured, the bottom panel was gratifyingly solid.

Starboard chine stringer
https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5603/15451082969_4e34465488_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/pxmQEe)

Port chine stringer (first lamell, or strip)
https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3941/15452162520_96e7bc6ee2_z.jpg

(https://flic.kr/p/pxsnzb)On to the frames. Frame 5, aft of the CB case, was first. The 5200 had skimmed over, and I ground off the leading bottom edge of the frame so it wouldn’t damage the seal. Square to the CB case, slather with thickened epoxy and put in place. I was a little concerned about the gap between the frame bottom and the bottom panel, but figured it was well within the gap-filling ability of thickened epoxy. Then I discovered the wisdom of the screws driven from beneath: the gap completely disappeared, and in its place was a nice bead of squeezout.

No point in stopping there! I proceeded with frame 3 (forward of CB case) and the 2 halves that make up frame 4 over the next couple of nights. Last night I fitted and attached the stem. This weekend should see frames 1 and 2 attached, and I hope to cut out the seat front panels, which will help me place frame 6, 7 and the transom. I hope to be scarfing stringers very soon.

Frames 3, 4 & 5 attached:
https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5601/15646904116_e6cd4a961a_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/pQEtsU)

As I’ve stated previously, I am building the yawl version. I’ve never owned a yawl rigged boat, and only sailed one, so it’s possible that I will one day want to change it. That would mean repositioning the main mast. As cheap insurance in the event I ever change my mind, I decided to include both the yawl and sloop mast supports. It cost me 2 pieces of douglas fir scraps, a smearing of epoxy and and extra 6 oz. or so of weight, so it makes perfect sense to me to have them both in place; if not for me, perhaps for the bloke who may buy the boat from me down the road!

Two mast supports:
https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8118/15672233642_11ee2c1217_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/pSUi3S)

MoMan
10-31-2014, 01:03 PM
Here's a close up of the CB pivot pin and the junction of frame 3.
https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3949/15051281813_00476f16ce_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/oW2KGR)


Stem and chine stringer junction:
https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3935/15051272153_457991abdc_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/oW2GQi)


A gratuitous view from forward:
https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7561/15672220892_ba33c352eb_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/pSUeg3)



In other news, Pete Menegaz and his wife invited me for a sail on his Pathfinder in Port Aransas at the boat fest. It was a perfect day and I was very impressed with the stability and smooth ride of his boat. We did end up doing some damage to his jib furler after trying out his new genoa. We are meeting up in Kemah tomorrow for a sail on Galveston Bay.
The Flying M:
https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3953/15598264411_6218aee913_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/pLnbzi)











Now then, is there anyone in the audience who would like to waste a bit of time? Please raise your hand.





https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3948/15672354702_56b3f6c9be_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/pSUV37)
Yes, we have one taker! Thank you TimeCat.




https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3945/15485323228_bda5d73162_b.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/pAok6w)


Happy Halloween!

--Mike

epoxyboy
11-02-2014, 12:33 AM
Hi Mike, looks like you are well into the "instant boat" part of the build. You asked a few posts ago about the frames not sitting square on the bottom panel on account of the rocker - you do need to be a bit cautious about winching up any screws too tight, that go up into the frames from underneath. These will give you a nice squeeze out of epoxy, and also try and pull you frames off vertical.
I also found that the bottom panel tried to bow across where the transom mounts, due to the force that the chine stringers were applying - a temporary brace across the panel fixed that, while the transom and frame 6a got the glue and screw treatment. I'm not sure if that is in any of the pics or not.
I saw my boat Kaiarahi sailing on Akaroa harbour yesterday, first time I've seen her since I sold up. FWIW, she toasted the Navigators in the fleet :D.

Pete

MoMan
11-02-2014, 09:37 AM
Thanks for that Pete!

I had an excellent sail yesterday with another Pete-Pathfinder-builder: Pete Menegaz. He took me out in his Flying M on Clear Lake for a few hours. Had a solid wind from 10-15 mph and it gave me a good feel for handling her. For me, it feels like a capable SUV compared to my Chrysler Mutineer.

PGMenegaz
11-10-2014, 12:06 AM
Hi Mike, Missed a great day at Kemah. Winds were lighter but the Genoa is back up and working well.... I made a foil using a pvc pipe and it works perfectly. Now the question remains to me what the best up-haul mechanism for raising and lowering the main sail. I have tried lacing (takes time when rigging) and have replaced with rope hoops with beads. The rope with beads is faster to rig, but it is still a struggle to raise in a wind and I can't imagine doing this single handed (someone needs to keep boat pointed into wind). My next step is to make wooden hoops, if you (or anyone) have other ideas would love to hear what works well.

swoody126
11-10-2014, 08:21 AM
my feeble remembery is trying to tell me where i saw an article on making fiberglass rings by wrapping wet fg tape around an appropriately sized piece of pvc pipe

maybe someone else will be able to link you to it

good luck

sw

keyhavenpotterer
11-10-2014, 09:38 AM
The Welsford Navigator "Slipjig" uses webbing with a snap buckle "dog collars" successfully.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OaOLdI_5mHM

Always found the luff lacing on my Tammie Norrie had resistance to movement even with it laced so it only crossed to the front of the spar. I'd do the dog collars I think in future with good clips from a walking shop.

Ed

MoMan
11-11-2014, 12:00 PM
Hi Mike, Missed a great day at Kemah. Winds were lighter but the Genoa is back up and working well.... I made a foil using a pvc pipe and it works perfectly. Now the question remains to me what the best up-haul mechanism for raising and lowering the main sail. I have tried lacing (takes time when rigging) and have replaced with rope hoops with beads. The rope with beads is faster to rig, but it is still a struggle to raise in a wind and I can't imagine doing this single handed (someone needs to keep boat pointed into wind). My next step is to make wooden hoops, if you (or anyone) have other ideas would love to hear what works well.

Sorry I missed that, but we had a great time at Wurstfest in New Braunfels. Gotta get my money's worth from my new lederhosen! My next couple of Saturdays are booked, but my Sundays are open if the weather cooperates. This season ain't over yet!

Ed (Keyhavenpotterer): Pete and I tried cat collars to reef his main, but they didn't hold very well. the plastic buckles just didn't hold.

MoMan
11-20-2014, 02:50 PM
All the frames from the aft end of the CB case to the bow are glued in place, along with the CB.
https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7484/15668714661_7beabc4dbb_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/pSAfYM)
That leaves frames 6, 6a and the transom. Because 6a and the transom are raked back, I felt it best to figure out the seat front panels before committing anything more to epoxy. I’ve been struggling with the seat fronts for a while now. I cut out some template material for the longer of the two seat fronts. Even with just a rough cut, the curvature fit the rocker of the bottom panel very close. I left the top rough for the time being.
https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7570/15096508904_80ed061361_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/p12y9h)

One thing that seemed off was the amount of rake to the transom/6a. It looked pretty extreme to my eye.
https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7582/15783790956_44e1689f3e_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/q3L49Q)
I used an angle finder (kinda like a giant sliding T-bevel) against the plans to transfer that angle to the boat. Everything matched. I finally found pix of other PFs online and decided it was fine. So I made a little jig to hold the transom at the proper angle.
https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5609/15188037493_9d22f451d0_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/p97Epp)

I kept nipping and tucking on the template pieces until they seemed reasonably close. Although most things fit, there were a few connections that still seemed off. The most perplexing spot is where frame 6a and the seat front intersect. The plans show the seat front (port side on my build) was a single piece, but frame 6a also appears to be a single, undivided piece. Do they fit like a pair of intersecting scissors? I finally gave up and cut the seat front in two pieces. I’ve read on other PF build blogs that any reasonable assembly of this area would be fine. (Note that I have since done a little additional trimming to the seat top fronts since these pix were taken; also cut out the vent hole in the section abutting the transom).

https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7550/15622310487_120cdfa7ca_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/pNuqCP)

There is still one spot that doesn’t look right: The support for the seat tops across frame 6. Look just to the left of the nearer bar clamp: The stringer that attaches to the backside (the outer, hidden face) of the seat front is at the proper height; but that would leave the remainder of the seat tops unsupported out to the hull.
https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5615/15807461825_a93b967b27_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/q5RnFg)
I’m not seeing any additional doublers that go across frame 6. Did I make frame 6 wrong? Should it be taller? If so, can I just glue on an additional doubler on top to fill the gap? I think tonight I will use some template material to redraw the frame and check.

--more pix in a sec--

MoMan
11-20-2014, 03:05 PM
Anyway, next step is to glue these remaining pieces in place to the bottom panel. I picked up some 3/4 doug fir 1/6; a couple of 14’ and four 10’ pieces. I plan to resaw them, scarf to length and then laminate the strips in place as I’m pretty sure they won’t take the bends required at the bow.

So if I’ve screwed something up, now would be a good time to point that out.

I suspect that I will need to cut a gap between the oak motor mount doubler and the top of the frame to accommodate the seat tops. I also believe I need to adjust the stringer notch to accommodate the angle of the frame. And I have a few drain/limber holes to drill before attaching.
https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7503/15188073373_a82d52b6d9_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/p97R52)


https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7530/15622668390_0a53c62f59_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/pNwg2y)



https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5616/15622323997_3dbba3f99b_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/pNuuDK)


https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7542/15622102628_b60457a71b_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/pNtmR3)


Here's a better view of the seat top gap on frame 6 I mentioned above.
https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7536/15187553324_6d439383df_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/p95btE)


These are still dry-fit so that funky-angled seat front piece in the lower left won't be glued into that angle!
https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7582/15805612341_a7a74c101a_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/q5FTTB)

--Mike

MoMan
11-20-2014, 08:50 PM
Well, I just re-laid out frame 6 and I get the same result: the top edge of the frame is 20mm below where the seat top should go. The plans do list a TEMPORARY 20x20 brace to help align the 2 frame sections; could it be that a portion of that brace should be permanent?

epoxyboy
11-21-2014, 03:39 AM
Well, I just re-laid out frame 6 and I get the same result: the top edge of the frame is 20mm below where the seat top should go. The plans do list a TEMPORARY 20x20 brace to help align the 2 frame sections; could it be that a portion of that brace should be permanent?
Hi Mike, something isnt right there - the tops of all the frames should line up. My best guess woud be that somewhere (either the seat front or the frame) youve been caught out by the slightly odd way JW lays out the panel offsets. IMOg> the lowest point of each panel should be at zero, not some random arbitrary value above that.
It caught me out at least twice.

Pete

epoxyboy
11-21-2014, 04:08 AM
The other thing I noticed is that you have the solid timber doubler on the front face of the motor well running all the way down onto the top of the 20x20 cleat that the back edge of the seat top is meant to sit on. If the motor well doubler has already had the glue and screw treatment, another 20x20 in front of the one thats already there will fix the problem. That, or cutting a rebate into the bottom edge of the doubler for the seat top to sit into.

Referring to the post above, your seat fronts look quite straight along the top edge, and I'm sure mine had quite a curve that sort of matched the bottom panel.

The drawing for frame 6a really is a bit of a clusterf&&k. I did suggest to John back when I was trying to puzzle it out that there was a lot going on there, and separate 6a front and rear face drawings would be a huge improvement.


Pete

MoMan
11-21-2014, 09:02 AM
The other thing I noticed is that you have the solid timber doubler on the front face of the motor well running all the way down onto the top of the 20x20 cleat that the back edge of the seat top is meant to sit on. If the motor well doubler has already had the glue and screw treatment, another 20x20 in front of the one thats already there will fix the problem. That, or cutting a rebate into the bottom edge of the doubler for the seat top to sit into.

Referring to the post above, your seat fronts look quite straight along the top edge, and I'm sure mine had quite a curve that sort of matched the bottom panel.

The drawing for frame 6a really is a bit of a clusterf&&k. I did suggest to John back when I was trying to puzzle it out that there was a lot going on there, and separate 6a front and rear face drawings would be a huge improvement.


Pete

You are right about my motor well configuration. I couldn't tell from the plans that there was supposed to be a gap between the doubler and the solid oak. I realized my error when I first did a dry fit and saw that the 20X20 wasn't doing anything functional! Since the frame isn't glued in, a couple of runs through with the circular saw should do the trick.

As for the seat tops, yes, I have them cut on a horizontal plane with no curvature. When I first started dry fitting, I toyed with (lightly) forcing a batten to follow a curve down to meet the top edge of frame 6a, but like the rake of the transom, it didn't look or feel right. So yes, that appears to be my folly.

Fortunately these mistakes of mine left extra wood to cut away rather than having to toss out a too-small piece and start over.

Thanks for chiming in once again to help save my bacon! Got to love this forum.

epoxyboy
11-21-2014, 02:05 PM
You are right about my motor well configuration. I couldn't tell from the plans that there was supposed to be a gap between the doubler and the solid oak. I realized my error when I first did a dry fit and saw that the 20X20 wasn't doing anything functional! Since the frame isn't glued in, a couple of runs through with the circular saw should do the trick.

As for the seat tops, yes, I have them cut on a horizontal plane with no curvature. When I first started dry fitting, I toyed with (lightly) forcing a batten to follow a curve down to meet the top edge of frame 6a, but like the rake of the transom, it didn't look or feel right. So yes, that appears to be my folly.

Fortunately these mistakes of mine left extra wood to cut away rather than having to toss out a too-small piece and start over.

Thanks for chiming in once again to help save my bacon! Got to love this forum.
We have about three guys at work dedicated to designing plastic components, to the stage that the files can go to a toolmaker. They call this sort of change a "metal off" modification, as in the toolmaker can make the change just by machining stuff off.
A "metal on" mod requires welding, machining, heat treating etc, and runs the risk of warping the tool - all bad. At least with epoxy, a "wood on" mistake can be fixed quite easily if it is caught early enough. There is a Navigator a couple of hours south of here that has been built with frame one about 100mm too narrow up through the middle stringers. It is really concave in the bow, and looks pretty odd (the present owner is always very quick to point out that he wasnt the builder:D), but still seems to sail OK.
It would have been easy to fix right up to the point that planks went on.....

Pete

MoMan
11-24-2014, 10:13 AM
Fixed!

https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8584/15661275940_1cda9b1031_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/pRW8GY)


https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7499/15848002982_e373e8f102_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/q9ra9J)


https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7561/15662619659_575d267e22_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/pS429x)

I spent Saturday morning resawing some 14' and some 10' douglas fir 1x6 to laminate into stringers. I dry fit the 2 uppermost stringers; with the upward twist from frame 6a to the transom, I may still need to do a little steaming. I also glued frame 6 to the chine stringer/bottom. I just have the drain holes to drill thu 6a and transom before I commit them to epoxy. I believe I will do the fillets in the hull before I attach the stringers; it looks like it will be much easier than climbing around inside.

--Mike

MoMan
11-24-2014, 10:52 PM
Fixed the gap (or lack thereof) under the motor mount.

https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7565/15250920404_a03e6c276d_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/peEXiw)

I had the same issue to fix under the boomkin doubler:
https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7561/15873183995_74b91061ca_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/qbEdA8)

Tonight, after contemplating for a long time, I drilled the holes for the drain tubes that go from the cockpit sole and out the transom. These are normally plugged while sailing and allow you to drain the interior when it's on the trailer.
https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7519/15687408067_4078aa104f_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/pUf4ST)

I'm using 3/4" pex tubing, which fits my drain plugs nicely.
https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8585/15847357666_273f53ed5c_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/q9nRjA)i (https://flic.kr/p/q9nRjA)

I think I will glue the transom, frame 6a and the seat fronts tomorrow night.

Rik van der Vaart
11-25-2014, 05:05 AM
Mike, sorry for not chiming in earlier. Was a little occupied...
Is the transom angled at 8 degrees? With me the seating panels should be straight from the centerboard till transom. All doublers should line up flush. I assembled transom and frames 6a together as sub assy and then glued it into place. Everything should be filletted before stringers and even before that as you go along. Much easier to get to and finish. Same with painting.

Paul G.
11-25-2014, 12:24 PM
Regarding the drain holes, it would be better to put self bailer(s) in at the back of the CB case as the angle that you need to lift the boat to drain out the back is pretty high, plus you can empty it while sailing!

MoMan
11-25-2014, 03:25 PM
Hi Paul-- Thanks for dropping in! I have Elvstrom self bailers in the 'glass dingy I currently own and I'm not in love with them. At least in my case, they seem to let more water in than take out, although they do work pretty well when it's blowing hard enough to get some speed up and heel the boat over a bit


Regarding the drain holes, it would be better to put self bailer(s) in at the back of the CB case as the angle that you need to lift the boat to drain out the back is pretty high, plus you can empty it while sailing!

Paul G.
11-26-2014, 02:55 PM
Andersons are the good, dont open them on where sand or stones can get in and they wont leak.

http://www.nzsailing.net/site/images/567970.jpg?v=20140211110658

MoMan
12-08-2014, 11:09 PM
It's not much of an update, but what the heck. The sheer stringers have been scarfed and dry fit in place. My original plan was to laminate them in order to take the bends and twists, but I really didn't like the lumpiness that the thinner strips created. I read one builder's regret about doing that, which created more work to sculpt them into a fair curve. I took the starboard stringer and started working it, watching for any signs of overstress. It didn't seem too bad, so I cinched it in place with all manor of clamps. I dug out the bag of bike inner tubes from my canoe build. Combined with the one-handed Irwin "quick clamps", the tubes work really well. I also dry clamped the port side stringer in place. Although I am anxious to attach the stringers with screws and epoxy, I figure now is the time to prep the bilge for paint. First was filleting all the joints. I’m pleased with how that went. I was a little sloppy with joints that will not be seen, which is most of them so far with the exception of the cockpit sole and the transom. I cleaned those up a bit. After the fillets cured, I scuffed their surfaces up, gave the entire hull a vacuuming, and set up to coat everything with straight, unthickened epoxy, which I finished Saturday evening. I’m ready to scuff sand all of that but I want to wait a few more days to make sure the epoxy is no longer “green.” I’ve read enough warnings about developing reactions to green epoxy. For paint, I think I will use acrylic exterior house paint. That stuff appears to be holding up well on the garage we painted 5 or 6 years ago, and this will live on a trailer under a tarp. I assume I won’t need any primer since I’m painting over scuffed up epoxy. Please chime in if you disagree.

https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8625/15783429438_36bc8d9abd_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/q3JcFL)

https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7574/15784807229_ec4d2145e6_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/q3RgfM)

Once I got the stringers close, I noticed Frame 2 was twisted out of square, so I rigged up some temporary braces.
https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7499/15945049586_83d12b7345_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/qi1xJ3)

https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7571/15970147822_b0b89bec10_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/qkebyf)

https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8572/15785100597_29cdb79093_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/q3SLsR)

MoMan
12-09-2014, 10:11 AM
I've been reading Gougeon's Epoxy Bible recently, so I decided to see if there is a chapter on finishing and Voila!


We find that we rarely need primer paints when we coat hulls with WEST SYSTEM epoxy. Primers can’t, of course, be used on naturally finished hulls, but even on painted surfaces, they don’t seem to result in any particular saving in finishing time.

Primers are not usually needed to help bond a paint film to cured WEST SYSTEM epoxy. Most finish coatings readily adhere to a clean and well-sanded epoxy-coated surface, although interfacing primers are required with some specialized bottom paints.

I did conclude that I should probably add a second coat of epoxy to my initial coat, but I see no reason to finish the bilge area beyond that. I'm also planning to follow some advice from Pete M.: don't affix the decks/seat tops until you have done a float test. He said he spent a great deal of time chasing down a leak upon launching. There is a perfect little pond with a boat ramp about 5 miles from my house, so as soon as the hull is buttoned down, I will take it to the pond and float around for approximately 3 beers and check for leaks. And probably take some leaks.

Another question for the group: I plan to install a wood sole in the approximately 3'X4' cockpit. After pricing teak at $28/bd. foot I thought to myself, "Who are you kidding; why not just use cherry?". My question is, what adhesive should I use? I read about a teak deck install on a good-sized yacht in Duckworks, I think, where they used epoxy, and a pigment additive for the black caulk lines. Wouldn't epoxy be too brittle for a sole that will be subject to sometimes-jarring weights? An alternative might be 3M 5200, but I'd hate to think of ever wanting (or needing) to rip out something like that in the future.

If you haven't already downloaded the free Gougeon PDF, I highly recommend it. It's a 400+ page guide to wooden boat building using epoxy, backed by years of experience and lab testing. I found the chapter on bonding hardware especially enlightening. Just google "Gougeon brothers" for a link.

Rich Jones
12-09-2014, 12:07 PM
The boat is looking fine!
I noticed on this and the other Pathfinder thread that there's a lot of space under floorboards and seats that is accessed only by small round hatches. Why not put large hatches on top of these areas so you can store lifejackets, anchors, extra line and gear? Or are they watertight for floatation? Seems like a terrible waste of space.
Carry on!

MoMan
12-09-2014, 01:59 PM
Thanks Rich! Yes, it's my understanding that the seat storage areas are part of the buoyancy tank system. Some people split the sections at the frames, creating four separate tanks. I suppose you could use larger watertight hatches on the seat tops, but I'm not too worried about running out of storage space. You can stuff quite a bit of gear through those 6" ports, and you still have the larger storage areas either side of the centerboard case. There is also a generous anchor well thru the forward deck.

--Mike


The boat is looking fine!
I noticed on this and the other Pathfinder thread that there's a lot of space under floorboards and seats that is accessed only by small round hatches. Why not put large hatches on top of these areas so you can store lifejackets, anchors, extra line and gear? Or are they watertight for floatation? Seems like a terrible waste of space.
Carry on!

P.L.Lenihan
12-09-2014, 02:09 PM
Looking really swell, Mike!! I can tell from your shop there will be more boats in your future too,lucky bugger! :D

Continued success!


Cheers!



Peter

Rik van der Vaart
12-09-2014, 03:02 PM
Planking is approaching fast!

suzyj
12-09-2014, 05:46 PM
Don't believe what they say. Planking is easy. Very nice looking boat - she's going to be quite roomy.

MoMan
12-09-2014, 08:33 PM
By the way, it's an honor to have you all aboard on my build, whether you've commented yet or are standing quietly in the background (like what I normally would do).

Ed Armstrong
12-10-2014, 12:02 PM
Don't remember if I commented on this one yet, but I'm enjoying watching!

MoMan
12-29-2014, 09:24 AM
Woo hoo! Stringers are all attached! She finally looks like a proper boat shape. No major issues--just a lot of octopus wrestling to corral the long, floppy stringers into the notches in the frames, twisting this way and that, praying not to hear any cracking noises. I did discover one frame has the stringer notch a little out of place, but I am confident that the planking will correct that and I can fill the small gap with wooden wedges and thickened epoxy. I started planing the starboard stringers last night. I thought I would probably use the power plane as it looks like a lot of work and a good chunk of material to remove, but throughout the build I have become a little surprised that I tend to reach for hand tools more than power tools. So I took my three planes (a smoothing plane, a block plane and a low-angle block plane) apart and gave each sole and blade a quick rub on some 600 wet/dry paper, then went after the d-fir stringers. Like so many other tasks, it wasn't as bad as I imagined. It was a real workout: I don't think my arm has gotten this much exercise since my first subscription to Girlie Mag Monthly.

Anyway, here are some pix:

https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7475/16106552575_8dca975a8c_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/qxhhWk)

https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8656/16132425865_3f3445ef7b_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/qzyUax)

https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8674/15510087114_c2196c4638_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/pCzfx5)

https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7554/15919160768_20b5de1af3_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/qfHRT7)


In this one, the lower starboard stringer is dry fitted, not yet attached.
https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7477/15919144908_78e6868d42_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/qfHMaE)

https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7529/15456903253_8812c8e69e_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/pxSEPX)

MoMan
12-29-2014, 09:56 AM
Here is a bit of the back story on my stringer installation.

I saved up enough confidence and hubris to attempt scarfing 9 boards at once. Easy peasy:
https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8636/15515657484_1b472a9525_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/pD4NpW)

https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7479/16136087971_1791703f54_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/qzTEMi)

The process was going to generate a good amount of wood chips from the power planer, so I rigged up a vac attachment using some bicycle tubing and hose clamps.
https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7570/16136088711_c0205fc4b3_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/qzTF14)

Speaking of bike tubes, if you want some versatile, cheap, durable and effective clamps, go to your local bike shop and ask them for their flat tires. I'm finding numerous uses, especially while wrestling the stringers. You can get epoxy on them, cut them down to a variety of sizes, tie them together to make longer ones; combine them with your existing clamps and you can generate a huge amount of tension. Best of all, they are free!

https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7501/15518271623_1d95c6cc43_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/pDicvi)

https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8564/15998476976_694da374ec_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/qnJnPW)

https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7558/15998485136_487e354026_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/qnJqfC)

Rik van der Vaart
12-29-2014, 09:58 AM
Big step done! Congrats.

I had to take stringers off and get them sit into the stem deeper as per drawing. Otherwise the planks would stand too proud from the stem. Messy but it worked out with the epoxy goop.

Starting out with handtools but always changing quickly to grinder or powerplane, shows i have a lesser patience level than you. ;)

P.L.Lenihan
12-29-2014, 02:45 PM
Ha! Who needs Girly Mag Monthly when you've those kind of curves to tickle your fading eye sight. Besides, you're still playing with"wood" no matter which way you look at!


Carry on Sir, it's good for my own fading eye sight.


Cheers!




Peter

MoMan
12-29-2014, 06:59 PM
Wise words from the master himself!


Ha! Who needs Girly Mag Monthly when you've those kind of curves to tickle your fading eye sight. Besides, you're still playing with"wood" no matter which way you look at!


Carry on Sir, it's good for my own fading eye sight.


Cheers!




Peter

Falcon1
12-31-2014, 03:59 PM
Great progress! You should be proud. Happy New Year!

MoMan
01-12-2015, 09:57 PM
I've been working on beveling the stringers, and got the starboard side pretty much done. What a workout!
https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7463/15972864398_6285490def_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/qkt76L)

I stuck it out with hand planes until I got down to the chine stringer. My shoulders just couldn't take the position, plus, there are a few sections forward where a plane simply won't fit.
https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7575/16082189569_2d4a30a1bc_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/qv8qEv)

So it was time for the angle grinder. Despite the speed, I'm not crazy about using it for a few reasons, at least in this instance. It's an awkward position, and very hard to see what I'm doing, which makes it easy to end up grinding out dips. It's also loud and dusty, which means I go full on head protection: goggles, headphones, dust mask (not the surgical mask kind either: the cover-the-mouth-and-nose w/ cartridge type). I start getting claustrophobic after awhile. At least it's cold out so I'm not drowning in sweat on top of all that. But the tool got the job done, although I still need to fine tune the section between frame 1 and 2.

In other news, The Lady has a name!!
https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7558/16080780290_aa1b90388b_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/qv1cJA)

I've been rolling potential names around my head for a couple of years now--even before I bought the plans! One of the early names that appealed to me -- more for the back story than anything -- was Ulfberht, (the Viking sword) (http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/ancient/secrets-viking-sword.html). The thing I didn't like was the difficulty of pronouncing it. But that lead me to Crucible-- the process of making crucible steel, which is how the swords were made. I like that crucible has a couple of definitions that mesh with the boat. First is that it's a vessel, a protective container. But it also means a sort of test, or challenge. And for me at least, this build is my biggest challenge to date.

The picture is an early prototype of the name board. I'm pretty set on the font (Matura MT Script Capitals). I'm still toying with exactly how the the cherry letters will affix to the board (considering carving a recess into the basswood), and the exact shape of the basswood part. Also toying with how to "break" the edges of the letters. I don't want them to remain 90 degrees, so my choices are to bevel, round over or distress them to give them a "hand-hewn" look, which is what I did on this prototype:
https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7565/16080625638_82e6e55ce2_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/quZpLb)

I think I will through bolt it so I can easily remove it for refinishing, repairs, etc.

In other news, I know I don't deserve it, but I went ahead and pulled the trigger:
[IMG]https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8665/16266346961_a51156faf5_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/qMpheX)

There was really nothing wrong with my old $12 Stanley contractor plane ... until I used the Lie Nielson! Wow, what a difference! I never knew you could get curls from planing end grain. This is mahogany end grain from the transom:
https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7575/16242222766_1a3a1209fd_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/qKgCXy)

I know that my ham-fisted skills don't deserve such a quality machine. In fact, it was almost a privilege when I got a minor slice on my index finger and drew a little blood!

I'm just starting to bevel the port side stringers, so eventually I will get around to planking.

Falcon1
01-13-2015, 07:12 AM
An A+ week for sure, MoMan! I love the name and the typeface. And you certainly deserve to own a tool that will give you as much pleasure as that plane. I've had mine for almost two years, and the feeling of confidence I still get each time I pick it up is wonderful.

Congrats!

Mike

MoMan
01-13-2015, 08:44 AM
Thanks Mike! Yes, I finished up beveling the aft starboard edge of the transom last night and almost didn't want to stop. But I have an entire additional side of stringers to bevel, so I should get my fix by then.

P.L.Lenihan
01-13-2015, 10:31 AM
https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7463/15972864398_6285490def_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/qkt76L)










https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7575/16242222766_1a3a1209fd_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/qKgCXy)

I know that my ham-fisted skills don't deserve such a quality machine.....................





Hi Mike,

I really enjoy looking at the top picture.In fact, I can spend a terrible amount of time just hypnotized by those many fine sweeping curves.I'm such a slut for curves!
Before you start closing her up with planking, could you take a whole bunch more photos of her from many different angles.It'll be the last chance any of us, your good self included, will ever get to see your boats' shape so dramatically defined.
As for that nice looking hand plane, I really cannot say I feel much empathy for your cause, as I've made it a point of pride to use only the cheapest crappiest bits of imported junk imaginable.Truly nasty bits of work they are.
However,knowing all too well how no amount of Texas Thinking Juice can ever get one to the point of ever feeling really deserving of fine tools,such as that hand plane, I'm willing to make you a one time offer, a veritable chance in a life time, to lighten the heavy burden of toiling away encumbered by nothing more then nasty thoughts of how undeserving you may be to have your work hindered in anyway by such chronic and persistent thoughts of undeserveredness.
So.....just wrap that puppy up in a little box and mail it to me.I'll even cover your postage to make this last task as easy as possible. You'll feel so good once back from the post office, you'll kiss your dog, hug your cat and even take your ever loving wife out for a fine celebratory evening of fine dining! Win win all around!

Friends don't let friends work while feeling undeserving.



Cheers!



Peter

MoMan
01-13-2015, 10:56 AM
That is a mighty fine offer Mr. Lenihan. I shall stew it over for the next 12-24 ounces.


Hi Mike,

I really enjoy looking at the top picture.In fact, I can spend a terrible amount of time just hypnotized by those many fine sweeping curves.I'm such a slut for curves!
Before you start closing her up with planking, could you take a whole bunch more photos of her from many different angles.It'll be the last chance any of us, your good self included, will ever get to see your boats' shape so dramatically defined.
As for that nice looking hand plane, I really cannot say I feel much empathy for your cause, as I've made it a point of pride to use only the cheapest crappiest bits of imported junk imaginable.Truly nasty bits of work they are.
However,knowing all too well how no amount of Texas Thinking Juice can ever get one to the point of ever feeling really deserving of fine tools,such as that hand plane, I'm willing to make you a one time offer, a veritable chance in a life time, to lighten the heavy burden of toiling away encumbered by nothing more then nasty thoughts of how undeserving you may be to have your work hindered in anyway by such chronic and persistent thoughts of undeserveredness.
So.....just wrap that puppy up in a little box and mail it to me.I'll even cover your postage to make this last task as easy as possible. You'll feel so good once back from the post office, you'll kiss your dog, hug your cat and even take your ever loving wife out for a fine celebratory evening of fine dining! Win win all around!

Friends don't let friends work while feeling undeserving.



Cheers!



Peter

MoMan
01-15-2015, 10:20 AM
Hi Pete-- Right now, me using a L-N plane is a little like putting a driver's ed student behind the wheel of a Ferrari! I've been experimenting with the adjustable throat and smooth-as-silk depth adjustment. But what a difference! I was originally planning to just replace the blade of my existing planes with those thicker, 1/8" Hock blades, then threw caution to the wind and went with the impulse purchase. No regrets yet. I just pray that I don't drop it on the concrete in a careless moment.

P.L.Lenihan
01-15-2015, 02:13 PM
I just pray that I don't drop it on the concrete in a careless moment.

I know a way which might allow you save and preserve your prayers for really important stuff and avoid living in fear daily.....wink wink nudge nudge :D:D:D


Hope it is warmer and dryer down your way then it is up this way, Mike.I envy your project!
Continued success with her!



Cheers!


Peter

MoMan
01-19-2015, 09:22 PM
Before you start closing her up with planking, could you take a whole bunch more photos of her from many different angles.It'll be the last chance any of us, your good self included, will ever get to see your boats' shape so dramatically defined

Peter-- This is excellent advice, and I took it to heart. So here are some gratuitous, dramatically staged and lit, pix:
https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7564/16119446177_75ac6b4788_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/qyqnKP)

https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7507/16305294065_cdf8863b3b_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/qQQTRK)

https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7529/16279361026_53ab5373f7_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/qNxYSo)

https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8683/16117966359_ca4d05ebf0_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/qyhMRH)

https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7521/16116757270_5d4c1c5ca9_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/qybArm)

https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7483/16302031951_c69d899285_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/qQyb9p)

MoMan
01-19-2015, 09:35 PM
... and a few more

https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8570/16136546577_0853cbba69_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/qzW27i)

https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7554/16135032850_a2d8abf92b_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/qzNg8y)

https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8581/16136210909_b7df0d7d60_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/qzUijV)

I solicited some feedback from my graphic designer friend, who threw out the idea of letters cut out of metal--he suggested copper or aluminum. While I don't care for it as a transom name board, it might look kinda cool as an interior badge, like on frame 2 bulkhead:
https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8641/15699983144_57dcb73bc1_b.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/pVmw1y)

--Mike

deke
02-09-2015, 07:40 PM
Moman, just finished reading this thread top to bottom, I just order plans and will begin building a Pathfinder soon down in Fl Keys. Just wanted to say thanks for taking time to put your build on the forum, I will be referencing it many times I'm sure. John posted a few days ago that the plans had been updated recently and many mistakes were fixed. Was curious if you found any thus far? Thanks brother, Deke.

MoMan
02-10-2015, 09:10 AM
Hi Deke-- Welcome aboard! Yes, there are a couple of mistakes that others have found which I have encountered so far. They will probably be pretty obvious when you run into them. I will try to remember to look at my plans tonight. My biggest challenge has been mentally projecting a 3D picture from the 2D plans. My brain just isn't wired like an engineer's!

Right now I am busy procrastinating before tackling spiling and planking. But I finally finished beveling the stringers. I suspect that I will need to fine tune a few spots as I plank, but it shouldn't be too bad. Let us all know when you start your thread.

--Mike

P.L.Lenihan
02-10-2015, 02:35 PM
Right now I am busy procrastinating before tackling spiling and planking.--Mike

This sounds like the perfect time for some Texas Thinking Juice to get you to kick the shifter into forward gear.Trust me,it works!


Lovely pictures too Mike.I particularly like the first three as there is an atmosphere of timelessness to them.One is not certain whether they have stumbled into a long abandoned boat shop or just happened to drop into a working shop to find the shipwright taking his lunch.Then again, it could be inside a museum with a life sized exhibition attempting to show an old timey shop with a boat in progress. Neat stuff!!


Thanks and continued success with your build!!!



Cheers!



Peter

MoMan
02-11-2015, 10:00 AM
... I did it the other way around, on the basis that a longer plank gave me more to swing on, and moved the inevitable join to a less highly stressed place.

Hey Pete-- Yes, this is exactly how John's build instrux read:

... cut a short piece of 9mm ply, long enough to run from the transom to a point 100mm forward of frame #7 ... These are your practice planks (the easy ones).

Truth be told, I've been busy correcting an earlier screw up: When I went to cut my bunk flats for the forward area, I grabbed 6mm ply instead of the specified 9mm (and got a nice, tight fit in the process). After confessing this on the Yahoo group forum, John chimed in to recommend simply gluing some reinforcing 6mm strips to the undersides to stiffen things up. I also applied some leftover fiberglass patches for the bigger spaces. I have most of it done and should finish it tonight or tomorrow.

Last night I opened a chilled bottle of Texas Thinkin' Juice, climbed in to the hull and did a bit of daydreaming. It's actually productive in that I started to mentally map out some of the future hardware locations and such. I am loving the journey!

--Mike

MoMan
02-12-2015, 09:50 PM
John posted a few days ago that the plans had been updated recently and many mistakes were fixed. Was curious if you found any thus far?

OK, finally remembered to review the plans:
Frame 2: Not really a mistake but some faint lines and duplicated numbers:
[IMG]https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7386/16513434121_a9cac0218a_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/raeEDp)

And frame 6A/7:
[IMG]https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8573/16515158645_e686576ae4_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/raovhz)

Hope this helps. I know there are other places that are confusing but I'm not there yet.

--Mike

deke
02-13-2015, 07:32 AM
Thanks for checking on that, very appreciated. Hopefully will get the plans today and will start the studying process. Also getting ready to order my ply, going to use hydrotec, I might order it from Boat Builder Central, you can order it with puzzle joints for the bottom and planks.

Also just thought of a trick I used when planking a plywood panga skiff. The bow had a tough bend similar to the pathfinder. I clamped about a 5' 2x4 to the end of ply plank where it needed to bend, perpendicular to the bend direction. This was my lever and I was able to bend the ply plank easily after screwing/clamping the bottom of the ply plank. I tied off the top of the 2x4 over night with the plank fairly close and then finished the next day. You can apply a lot of force so you have to be careful.

MoMan
02-22-2015, 10:55 PM
Here’s where we stand today. You’d think by this time I would have her all planked up and ready to flip. But I never promised you a quick build!

Having exhausted all reasonable excuses to continue procrastinating and delaying the planking process, I was faced with the voice of Morgan Freeman, misquoting his character in one of my favorite movies: “Either get busy plankin’, or get busy quittin’.”

So it was. I bit the bullet and cut some plywood for planking. Of course, my plan was poorly executed. I took a couple of measurements and jumped in, thinking I had estimated conservatively. Nope, I was way off. I really needed templates to experiment with and fine tune. The (eventual) result was a fantastic fit. As soon as I have the second plank marked out, I will affix the garboard plank with glue and screws.

https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8668/16432311598_bbd18ce86a_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/r34TKd)


https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8663/16432310978_0b1a85ef41_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/r34Tyw)



https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8607/16432490890_a8a151a82e_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/r35P3s)

MoMan
02-22-2015, 11:06 PM
I decided that there is no better time than now to build a set of clamps I’ve always wanted: Deep throat! And not just because of the scintillating descriptor. Dryfitting the planks is showing me the utility of this cheap, effective clamp. Even better, I’ve now found a use for all those 14-18” long plywood scraps. For the clamping feature, I cut to length some all-thread:
https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8595/16593540656_60a68e2e91_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/rhjewy)





As part of my other time-foolery, I have been toying around with building some of my own hardware. Mahogany scraps. I got some measurements from The Marlinespike Sailor, and took some guesses from photos on the web. I’m sure there will be experimenting once I get closer to launch date, which is a LONG ways off!

https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8681/16593534216_9c2930789b_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/rhjcBw)



I wanted those sweet rope-stropped blocks I’ve seen other’s make. But when I’ve attempted much in the way of rope work, I’ve made a dog’s breakfast of it. So I was delighted to discover a design that employs beautiful, wooden cheeks but not the rope work, I was intrigued. This is 1/16" x 1/2" aluminum. I couldn't find any reasonably priced stainless steel in this dimension. This is just my quick and super-sloppy prototype. The bends on future versions will be much more refined. I hope. It’s easy to extend the metal straps to create a becket:
https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8594/16619501735_8157b74926_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/rjBhRn)



Let’s see, I also cut the drain holes for the bunk flats. I will epoxy those in place the next time I mix up a batch for something.
https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8627/16412207307_86fde77bcc_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/r1hRrv)

That's it for now!
--Mike

deke
03-09-2015, 09:59 PM
MoMan , are you using bronze or stainless screws in your build? And are you going to use screws for clamping the planking and leaving them in or taking them out?

Tom

Rik van der Vaart
03-10-2015, 12:09 AM
looks really nice moman. Good choice on draining tubes. size looks big enough from here. you will need a scoop for in the cockpit to scoop out the water on a fresh day. a few days ago I had a swimming pool in the cockpit with salt water. big action out there. awesome boat.

MoMan
03-13-2015, 01:03 PM
MoMan , are you using bronze or stainless screws in your build? And are you going to use screws for clamping the planking and leaving them in or taking them out?

Tom

Tom-- All permanent screws are stainless. You can buy them cheap from DuckWorks. I use plain old drywall screws for temporary stuff. I also bought some stainless steel brad point nails to use in my pneumatic nail gun --perfect for smaller stuff that would likely split with screws. I used them so far on the reinforcing pieces on the frame heads, which provide backing for the seat backs/coaming. I may use them as an initial "clamp" for the planks also, to hold things while I scramble for screws. I believe the plans call for planks to be screwed in, in addition to the epoxy, so I would probably leave them in.

--Mike

MoMan
03-13-2015, 01:09 PM
Hey Rik-- great to hear of some good adventures with your new baby! Sounds like you are quickly growing more comfortable in higher wind conditions.

Next Thursday evening, I will ride to Corpus Christi, TX with Pete Menegaz. We are meeting a few other boats to do an overnight shakedown cruise in preparation for the Texas 200 in June. It's great--as crew, I get to see and experiment with all the arrangements he has made on his Pathfinder ("The Flying M"), which should help me make some decisions on mine.



looks really nice moman. Good choice on draining tubes. size looks big enough from here. you will need a scoop for in the cockpit to scoop out the water on a fresh day. a few days ago I had a swimming pool in the cockpit with salt water. big action out there. awesome boat.

MoMan
03-31-2015, 09:44 PM
The beer plank is on.

The garboard plank is glued and beveled and the second plank is fitted—at least the forward section. The 2 aft sections are fitted via templates; just need to transfer lines to the 9mm ply and cut, scarf, fit, attach, yadda yadda ya.

It hasn’t been my best work, but so far I believe I can mask my shortcomings with epoxy and paint.

Have I mentioned that I waste a lot of time? It’s a pace I am enjoying immensely, because I am probably at least as excited, if not more, about the journey than the destination of a completed boat. I like the way suzyj put it: “the intent of this build wasn't to have a boat as soon as possible, but instead was to give me something to obsess about for a couple of years.” Although I am certain I will surpass the “couple of years” window in no time at all.

Anyways, here are some pix.

Garboard attached with plank 2 clamped in place. Still working on cutting gains.
(https://flic.kr/p/rTNqUM)https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7615/16995119445_84d12fc995_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/rTNqUM)





Garboard plank scarf (lower) and forward section of plank 2 with scarf cut, clamped for fitting. Under that is a 1/8" door skin template for the remaining section of plank 2. The scarf joints will not line up that closely when final.
(https://flic.kr/p/rTNqUM)https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8726/16995103015_5ea4790d94_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/rTNm2v)

I'm filleting as I go. Pleased with my fillets so far, and I expect my skill and technique will improve by the time I get to the more visible fillets.
https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7614/16807376118_23b0458042_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/rBdcmS)


In my storage spaces, I thought it would be prudent to add some tie-down spots.
https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7651/16807650670_da64e7cb6b_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/rBeAYw)

https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8730/16807650450_5b17fd2c33_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/rBeAUJ)

Here is the CB pivot pin on the forward part of the case. There needs to be an inspection port here to service the CB, so I believe I will make that a rectangular port, as big as will fit between the bunk supports and the trunk. It can also hold some stuff.
https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8751/16372739824_055309852f_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/qWNz8E)

--Mike

MoMan
03-31-2015, 10:01 PM
(continued)

Beveling the garboard plank turned out to be more work than my wimpy shoulders could take using hand planes. I tried the much recommended angle grinder,
https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8717/16807390678_15c94630db_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/rBdgFU)
but eventually dug out the power plane. After getting the port side beveled, I decided I could do better and came up with this temporary configuration:
https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7598/16994227281_f8367f25d5_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/rTHRGD)

You can better visualize how it works this way:
https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7598/16994229751_e179a116e6_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/rTHSre)
The wooden blocks, attached via hose clamps to a rod and a scrap of brass square rod that runs through the planer's fence attachment hole -- those blocks ride along the stringer above the plank you are beveling, so it rides in the proper orientation of the beveled stringers. There are two wooden runners so I can run the planer in either direction. The white PVC elbow is to direct the fire hose stream of chips away from my face. Anyway, it worked quite well.

I'm also pleased with my home made deep throat clamps
https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7597/16808920409_a5f0ae6f72_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/rBm7qz)

--Mike

ahamaywine
04-01-2015, 09:02 AM
It's great to see some updates! Keep up the good work.

deke
04-15-2015, 08:21 PM
MoMan, so I'm getting ready to screw and glue the frames to the floor, could you verify that the frames should be plumb and not square to the floor in the vertical? The frames appear to be drawn plumb in the plans, but there is not mention of it in the instructions.

Hows the planking going?

Deke

P.L.Lenihan
04-16-2015, 04:09 AM
Beveling the garboard plank turned out to be more work than my wimpy shoulders could take using hand planes. I tried the much recommended angle grinder,
https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8717/16807390678_15c94630db_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/rBdgFU)


--Mike





What a fine picture! Such grand memories it brings up for me.You may have had better success had you taken off that silly Billy-Go-Faster kiddie handle and just palmed the grinder head(the side opposite the wheel).

But ya did well,nevertheless and I can only suggest practice,more practice, with the wonderful,glorious and sexy right angle grinder!



Cheers!



Peter

epoxyboy
04-16-2015, 04:26 AM
MoMan, so I'm getting ready to screw and glue the frames to the floor, could you verify that the frames should be plumb and not square to the floor in the vertical? The frames appear to be drawn plumb in the plans, but there is not mention of it in the instructions.

Hows the planking going?

Deke
They are all supposed to be plumb, except the transom. You need to be careful to not overtighten any screws that go up from the bottom, as this will try and pull the frames off vertical, particularly the ones toward the stern. If you can brace frames up to the ceiling of your workspace, it helps a lot, especially when you're wrestling with stringers.

Pete

MoMan
04-16-2015, 08:22 AM
Yes, what Pete said.

Planking is moving along. I finished attaching plank 2 and am now in the midst of plank 3. I'll post some pix soon.

--Mike

deke
04-22-2015, 09:14 PM
MoMan, how far in front of the aft side of B3 did you locate the aft edge of the yawl mast step (If you measure along the top of the stem floor support)? The deck plan shows the aft of the mast cutout in the deck at 1030mm forward of B3, but this does not match the location on the stem detail? Getting ready to glue the stem down and just double checking everything before I make it permanent.

Thanks, Deke

MoMan
05-07-2015, 10:23 PM
Woohoo! Whiskey plank attached at last. I've also been working on the seat tops and cutting out hatches. Got the anchor well floor glassed. That's about it for now.


https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5449/17209415178_d29692582f_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/sdJKyN)

https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8832/17211005939_74060b4f97_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/sdSUrH)


https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7692/17397218525_cc05803952_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/svkhXx)


https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7752/17209411108_ed37452cb7_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/sdJJmC)

https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5341/17397215485_a77c5a938c_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/svkh48)

--Mike

ahamaywine
05-07-2015, 11:01 PM
Great to see some photos! Beautiful name plate, loved the metal one too! (Is there a fancy name for a boat's name plate?)

epoxyboy
05-08-2015, 02:11 AM
Congrats Mike,
Getting that last plank on is a real milestone. I bet you're thinking thats a big piece of boat in the garage, now she's got all her clothes on! I know I did, when I got mine to that stage.

Pete

suzyj
05-08-2015, 02:48 AM
Hey, you're moving at quite a good pace. Not much more than a year and you're all planked up. Congrats!

On the topic of whisky, I was wondering what the regulation whisky is for dinghys? I'm thinking I'll carry a bottle or three of Tullamore, on account of it being reasonably inexpensive and coming in a flattish bottle that won't roll around much...

MoMan
05-08-2015, 06:42 AM
Congrats Mike,
Getting that last plank on is a real milestone. I bet you're thinking thats a big piece of boat in the garage, now she's got all her clothes on! I know I did, when I got mine to that stage.

Pete
And my garage got smaller too! Yes, she's feeling like a pretty big boat. I can't believe it only weighs 485 lbs, which is less than my current 15ft. fiberglass sloop.


Hey, you're moving at quite a good pace. Not much more than a year and you're all planked up. Congrats!

On the topic of whisky, I was wondering what the regulation whisky is for dinghys? I'm thinking I'll carry a bottle or three of Tullamore, on account of it being reasonably inexpensive and coming in a flattish bottle that won't roll around much...

Thanks Suzy! For this particular stage, I went with Pendleton, distilled in the small Oregon town of Hood River. My wife and I fell in love with the place back in the mid-90s. When I finish her, perhaps I'll step it up to a nice single-malt.

--Mike

MoMan
05-08-2015, 06:47 AM
Great to see some photos! Beautiful name plate, loved the metal one too! (Is there a fancy name for a boat's name plate?)

Thanks! Yes, the name plates (I've been referring to the transom one as a nameboard) came out better than I expected. Those are actually the prototypes, but I'm thinking about keeping the aluminum one as is. I kind of like the roughness, which fits with the name.

--Mike

deke
05-08-2015, 09:10 AM
Congrats on a huge step! Looking sweet, nice work brother. Did you use the trace method for getting the plank shapes described in the instructions?

MoMan
05-09-2015, 06:10 AM
Congrats on a huge step! Looking sweet, nice work brother. Did you use the trace method for getting the plank shapes described in the instructions?

Yes. I clamped 1/8" template material to the stringers and traced above and below, rough cut to the line and sweetened up with a block plane. All joints scarfed. For beveling the plank tops, the power plane is hard to beat, although the hollow cheeks of the bow area needed an angle grinder.

I do plan to go back and install countersunk stainless steel screws. I used 1" drywall screws to hold the plank bottoms until the glue cured (and spring clamps for the tops). They were so quick to drive in.

One other thing I highly recommend: disposable cake-decorating bags (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B009YM7698/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o05_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1). Really controlled the epoxy.

Rik van der Vaart
05-09-2015, 09:48 PM
Awesome Job Moman! Step by step.

epoxyboy
05-26-2015, 12:59 AM
Looks like you had some really ugly weather over there, hope you two got through it unscathed.

Pete

MoMan
05-27-2015, 09:04 PM
Looks like you had some really ugly weather over there, hope you two got through it unscathed.

Pete

Thanks for your concern. Yes, we came out smelling like a rose because our street is one of the higher ones in the area; I've never seen it flood. Our neighborhood was hit pretty hard though. We were at the epicenter of the rainfall: 11" overnight! My house is about 100 yards from Braes Bayou; the news crews were set up at the next intersection down from our house. We couldn't have driven out if we had needed to. Here are a few pix I took from my bike yesterday morning.

The park bench marks the hike/bike trail, about 10 yards from the bayou bank. The concrete, to the right of the grass, is the street.
https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8786/17498685334_f001a903e0_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/sEikvh)

Metro bus at the entrance to my neighborhood. Note driver still at the wheel:
https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8832/17500785423_cfb1c79ee7_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/sEu6MH)

There is a four-lane boulevard, separated by a grassy median, under there:
https://c2.staticflickr.com/8/7665/17933676460_41f703579b_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/tjJMdh)


Virtually every car in the apartment parking lots across the bayou from us got flooded:
https://c2.staticflickr.com/8/7779/17933577280_b3b7df599f_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/tjJgJh)


Do NOT turn right here ... or left:
https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8844/17933424978_5616e1d965_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/tjHuso)


... and this is why we don't canoe in high water conditions:
https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8817/18094849766_9f287704ce_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/tyYQqo)

Sadly, tonight on my commute home, I am beginning to see the tell-tale signs of the nightmare that other homeowners are now facing: piles of soaked carpet, ruined furniture and mounds of muddied drywall, growing exponentially at the street curbs. I'm feeling extremely fortunate.

--Mike

epoxyboy
05-28-2015, 03:39 AM
The flooding etc made the news here, with H town featuring for about fifteen seconds.
We know that extremely fortunate feeling well, having a property that made it through our year of earthquakes almost unscathed. Anyway, good to hear that you guys are OK.

Pete

Canoez
05-28-2015, 08:40 AM
MoMan - too late to build an ark?

MoMan
05-28-2015, 12:55 PM
MoMan - too late to build an ark?

Well, the wife wants to bring our 150lb mastiff along sailing, so this may turn into an ark!

Fitz
05-30-2015, 07:37 AM
Good to hear you managed to stay dry. Best wishes to your neighbors as they recover.

Fitz

john welsford
06-02-2015, 09:45 PM
Hey, you're moving at quite a good pace. Not much more than a year and you're all planked up. Congrats!

On the topic of whisky, I was wondering what the regulation whisky is for dinghys? I'm thinking I'll carry a bottle or three of Tullamore, on account of it being reasonably inexpensive and coming in a flattish bottle that won't roll around much...

Actually Tawny Port is a quite acceptable substitute for Whisky, there is a brand that comes in a square section bottle that fits nicely through an inspection port and will sit in the angle of the seat front where it meets the bottom so cant roll around.

John Welsford

john welsford
06-02-2015, 10:23 PM
Very nice looking job so far Mike, great to be able to watch the progress. Thanks for posting.

Crucible? Is the name plate to be "cast".

John Welsford



Woohoo! Whiskey plank attached at last. I've also been working on the seat tops and cutting out hatches. Got the anchor well floor glassed. That's about it for now.


https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5449/17209415178_d29692582f_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/sdJKyN)

https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8832/17211005939_74060b4f97_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/sdSUrH)


https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7692/17397218525_cc05803952_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/svkhXx)


https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7752/17209411108_ed37452cb7_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/sdJJmC)

https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5341/17397215485_a77c5a938c_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/svkh48)

--Mike

MoMan
06-03-2015, 11:12 AM
Very nice looking job so far Mike, great to be able to watch the progress. Thanks for posting.

Crucible? Is the name plate to be "cast".

John Welsford

Hi John-- It's an honor to have you drop in. The name plate will be forged ... out of wood! But I'm malleable if you have alternative suggestions.

john welsford
06-06-2015, 02:55 PM
Just keeping you on your "mettle" there

John Welsford


Hi John-- It's an honor to have you drop in. The name plate will be forged ... out of wood! But I'm malleable if you have alternative suggestions.

MoMan
07-21-2015, 09:21 PM
Well it ain't much of an update, but it's all I've been able to muster. I've been working on the rudder blade and cheeks.

The extreme humidity invading Houston is less motivating for outside work than you might think. I guess I can't complain too much as we had a pleasant spring and a relatively tolerable June. Now the soul sucking, rage inducing humidity is here to stay until mid-October. Ugh.

Here is some 1/4" hardboard template material:
https://farm1.staticflickr.com/466/19713552818_18296b801a_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/w327rG)

The blade has been glued up (douglas fir with leading and trailing edges of cherry), cut to the outline and then shaped.

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/270/19901559765_b8fe020eb3_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/wjCGmM)
I can't tell if the bottom edge should be 90 degrees or if it slopes up aft a touch. It looks that way on the plan but there is no marking to indicate it.

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/429/19278935544_6beca10631_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/vnBzSq)
A nice, thin 4mm trailing edge. I was thinking of a single layer of 6oz fiberglass for the leading edge for abrasion and impact resistance, like the plans call for on the centerboard. Any reason not to (besides additional weight/effort)?

I've also got the blanks glued up for the cheeks, which are solid cherry. Yes, my lady will be sporting cherry cheeks on her transom. Please don't stare.

It wasn't easy to cut into that long beam of 8/4 cherry, but it's been languishing on my lumber rack for a couple of years waiting for a worthy project. It was about 6 or 7 inches wide -- not wide enough for the cheeks so I resawed and bookmatched them with epoxy.

That's it for now.

--Mike

MoMan
08-16-2015, 08:46 PM
I guess I've been a bit remiss in updating my thread this summer, but I have been making some incremental progress; namely on the rudder assembly. Here's how she is looking tonight:

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/568/20019079283_93de80c20d_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/wv21Pn)

The rudder blade is doug fir laminates, with the leading and trailing edges cherry (or was it mahogany?) for slightly increased durability. I also added a layer of 6 oz fiberglass to the leading edge. I need to apply a bit of fairing compound to blend in the edge of the glass. After some fiddling, it is all fitting together nicely. Here's a shot from directly aft:

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/625/20451989398_7c894301ce_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/xagMUS)

The blade will be painted. I figure it will get beat up and will spend much of its service under water, so why bother with varnish? The cherry cheeks, on the other hand, will be finished bright. I countersunk the screws and epoxied bungs over the screw heads.

I did run up against the law of unintended consequences: When I drew out the mahogany transom, I decided that the arch was a little more arched than I liked, so I dropped the arc height down an inch or so to soften it. I was quite pleased with the outcome ... until I went to install my pintels:

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/759/20614116786_d4e6c34c87_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/xpAJJE)


I was forced to cut into the oak doubler to accommodate the pintle. At least that section will be painted, and consequently won't look as chopped up ... I hope. So far, it seems like it all fits OK.

On another note, I am currently experimenting with the tiller shape. The designer leaves that entirely up to the end user. I sailed on Pete Menegaz's Pathfinder for the Texas 200 this past June, which offered a wealth of experience in what details I want for my boat. One feature is an adjustable/pivoting tiller. I posted an idea on another thread, which was soundly rejected on the grounds of complexity and weakness:
https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5649/19933947314_1d9fc30b12_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/wnuG3N)

So I'm experimenting with different shapes that offer comfort while seated, yet allow me to steer effectively while standing.

Extra swoopy:
https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5689/20017463684_da439867fb_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/wuSJyd)


More traditional
https://farm1.staticflickr.com/733/20017441804_0d444a700d_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/wuSC3Y)

Kinda leaning toward more traditional at this point.

MoMan
08-16-2015, 08:54 PM
I've also started the move to install decking. I've attached the support pieces for the side decks ( I think they are called "carlins"), and extended them forward for additional support under the foredecks.

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/616/20452008558_e14405c6da_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/xagTBd)

Oh, and the king plank is glued and screwed in place
https://farm1.staticflickr.com/618/20639984425_fb1c06253c_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/xrTjhr)

You can also see that I've installed my main storage hatches on each side of the CB case. These are big enough to swallow an auto-battery sized marine battery, if I choose to go that route.

https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5618/20453288399_10c230cae4_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/xaos4r)

I guess that's it for now. I continue to contemplate how best to flip the hull over so I can work on the bottom and the lapstrake joints. Lots to think about.

--Mike

Rik van der Vaart
08-16-2015, 08:56 PM
The swoopy may not be a bad choice. The engine head will be in the way of the tiller if it is straight.

MoMan
08-19-2015, 08:22 PM
Just finished a fantastic visit by Tom (deke) who was in town on a layover. Four hours of amateur boat talk sure flies by quick! You can view Tom's build thread here: Pathfinder build in FL Keys (http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthread.php?188315-Pathfinder-Build-In-FL-Keys)

And since I failed to mention it during your visit, Tom, thank you for your service as a U.S. Navy pilot.

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/569/20693031526_150a45ae5a_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/xwzckC)

MoMan
08-23-2015, 08:43 PM
So after attaching my carlins, I decided they were wrong:
[IMG]https://farm1.staticflickr.com/709/20613780496_e26ecfd9cc_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/xpz1Ly)

I love the curves, but they don't mesh with the details of the plans:

[IMG]https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5673/20019110123_b2a5ee7bcd_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/wv2aZ6)

So I decided to cut the supports because they extend too far inboard. But doing so means dealing with a bit of tension:
[IMG]https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5835/20642050450_6bedf9497e_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/xs4Ury)

Moving the carlins outward means I will have the ability to trim the piece down to fit. So I took some measures to keep the split from traveling too far upstream:

[IMG]https://farm1.staticflickr.com/713/20803796386_6b7f899c2b_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/xGmTSA)

Now at this point, you would assume I have some additional photos to supplement my post, but I don't at this moment. AT any rate, progress continues, albeit slowlyl.

MoMan
08-24-2015, 10:07 PM
Here is how I rerouted the carlins.
https://farm1.staticflickr.com/613/20859601705_022480a95b_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/xMhURg)

Now to dry fit the foredeck pieces. Here's a great example of my favorite, free bicycle clamps:
https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5660/20837191901_c3236e9a51_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/xKj4ck)
They're perfect for pulling the 6mm decking down over the curved frame tops.

To prep for gluing and screwing, I shot some screws down the center of the king plank, and while everything is held in place, I trace a pencil line underneath to mark the frames, the carlins and the hull interior. This shows me where to locate the screws so they are centered. I predrilled from the underside, then flipped over and ran a countersink bit into the screw holes. Next, mix up some neat epoxy, coat the underside and any raw wood on the frames, etc. Then it was on to mixing up thickened epoxy. After getting all the thickened stuff out, I set the ply down slowly to line up the three original drywall alignment screws. From there, I worked my way down the kingplank and out toward the hull, working the clamps as I moved.

So now I am half planked!
https://farm1.staticflickr.com/762/20671628908_abf4dc55bf_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/xuFv5Y)

MoMan
08-30-2015, 09:59 PM
Decking continues. This went a lot easier than I was expecting, and it is looking really great. The 2nd side (starboard in this case) was a little more difficult because I lost the ability to clamp to the kingplank. But some scraps wedged against the garage rafters worked just fine.

[IMG]https://farm1.staticflickr.com/616/20398895473_7f72949448_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/x5zEWn)

[IMG]https://farm1.staticflickr.com/717/20833164889_4a06387f1a_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/xJXq76)

After the foredeck, I moved to the side decks--port side first. My deep throated home made clamps came in handy:

[IMG]https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5809/20397306974_9c3cfb1880_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/x5rwJs)

Another view, looking forward
[IMG]https://farm1.staticflickr.com/673/20832047408_cdf33b0eab_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/xJRFVb)

Then on to starboard. I used more predrilled screws (permanent stainless steel) on this side so I didn't need the deep throats
[IMG]https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5732/20398912123_f76a9b2d56_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/x5zKTr)

MoMan
08-30-2015, 10:14 PM
I'm also working on the additional support pieces that run around the edges underneath the bunk flats/seat tops. I'm not enjoying it. It's a lot of bending over in cramped spaces to custom fit a lot of short pieces slathered in gooey epoxy. A brad nailer loaded with 1" stainless steel brads helps. I have the port side bunk flats done. The seat top supports should be easier as they are more linear. Also got the anchor well access hatch cut out.

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/699/20993750736_3f06c21304_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/xZ9sFA)

The transom and rudder cheeks are pretty much finished. I sanded them down to 220 and got out some flagship varnish. I thinned it 50% with mineral spirits and applied a coat. Looks beautiful if I do say so myself.

https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5683/21027574261_fb62cf5f00_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/y38PeP)

I masked off the back edges of the planks as I plan to apply some neat epoxy and I don't want the varnish to get a chance to seep in there first. Made a trip to the lumber yard Saturday. They don't carry vertical grain fir (for spars) so I went through the stack and picked out the straightest grain I could find. That's all for now.

--Mike

Rik van der Vaart
08-31-2015, 06:03 AM
Wow, lots of progress! You did a nice job on the deck and coamings, they flow nicely into each otther. Those doublers you put before was a good idea.

MoMan
09-15-2015, 08:25 PM
I guess I can justify an update. The decking is complete, which feels like a nice milestone. I even got it done in time to show my family who were all in town for Mom's 80th b-day.

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/705/20829842164_ac25814fe1_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/xJEonJ)


https://farm1.staticflickr.com/683/21264713988_cb49798c04_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/yp6dBN)

https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5761/21441590742_69e54d2295_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/yEHKV1)

For the anchor well, I am toying with a little detail to dress it up a touch; sort of a mini-coaming from mahogany. This is the plywood prototype:
https://farm1.staticflickr.com/585/20831436803_4af0599fd2_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/xJNypv)

I also cut the pieces for the coaming (mahogany) and the upper rub rails (cherry). The plans suggest 9mm ply for the coaming, but I'm going to try mahogany. I sliced a couple of planks down on the table saw to 3/8" x 5". Holding them up to the sheer along the deck, I don't think they will take the bend of the sheer, so I set about building a bigger steam box out of 3/4" CDX ply, 8' long. The coaming pieces are 9', so they will stick out a little at the end. I should be able to stuff some wet rags around the lumber to help seal in the steam. I added some scrap strips on the bottom to raise the lumber out of any standing water.

[IMG]https://farm1.staticflickr.com/669/21264489620_3b71a54c77_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/yp54Vo)

I will hook up the propane turkey fryer for heat. The tubing is the tough braided poly vinyl (I think), which I have used for steam operations in the past. The pot is the same one I bought from Goodwill to melt my centerboard lead ballast. The lid that came will it probably wasn't the original since it doesn't fit very well, so I fashioned a better fitting plywood lid. I will weight it down during the operation.

Otherwise, I've been putting together another lumber shopping list: more mahogany, more cherry, and perhaps some better d-fir for the spars. The last lumber yard I went to had a limited selection, and I'd like to find some vertical grain.

That's it for now

--Mike

addendum:
In the pic above, it looks like there are 2 tubes coming out of the metal pot. The smaller tube in the background is actually my first attempt at employing the original lid, and using plumbing materials I had on hand.
https://farm1.staticflickr.com/773/21426315166_c3b270756c_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/yDnt21)
But that meant using a 1/4" toilet/faucet line which I figured would be way too small to fill that big space. So I broke down and made the trip to Home Depot for the 1" braided tubing and a couple of 1" nipples which thread nicely into the corresponding plywood bits.

deke
09-16-2015, 10:29 AM
Nice. Have you finished the transom deck support. Curious what you did there at the leading edge going across.

MoMan
09-16-2015, 10:45 AM
Curious what you did there at the leading edge going across.

Nothing yet! Plans call for a reinforcing piece of 6mm underneath to span from gunnel to gunnel, plus an additional doubler to support the yawl mast. So far, I have only added small pieces under the joints. I intend to add a wider piece of mahogany under the forward edge of the aft deck which will support some belaying pins to tidy up various lines. I will do the same under the fore deck.

MoMan
09-26-2015, 04:05 PM
She's turtled!

[IMG]https://farm1.staticflickr.com/695/21550792389_f4cf670fa2_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/yQnrL2)

After much feet dragging, second guessing, shop cleaning and lift method experimentation, I finally bit the bullet and called my father in law and brother in law to assist with flipping her over (nephew helped as well). Hopefully this will be the only instance that will find her in this orientation. It all went as well as could be expected. Earlier in the week I removed the last of the screws holding her to the build jig. I also dragged out what chain I had and started experimenting with the best ways to lift it, what the ceiling lift points should be, etc.

Preparations:
[IMG]https://farm1.staticflickr.com/763/21549747580_11d4cf1a2d_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/yQh6b5)

Scrap blocks to protect plank edges:
[IMG]https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5656/21737740845_cafd4ee0b9_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/z7TB2g)

Area below cleared of junk
[IMG]https://farm1.staticflickr.com/564/21549887798_3686dea159_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/yQhNRC)

Airborne! Once clear of the jig, we dragged it out from underneath and put it out of the way on the driveway.
[IMG]https://farm1.staticflickr.com/720/21550895669_df8ec2bf88_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/yQnYsH)

This bow/stem shot shows one of my screw ups. I just found that junction a challenge and really botched it up. Fortunately, some scrap bits can be slathered up with thickened epoxy to fill the embarrassing crevasses and I will hide the whole scar under a cherry stem cap.
[IMG]https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5734/21747085551_5c646cbc2f_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/z8HuST)

MoMan
09-26-2015, 04:21 PM
Flipping continued

Bottom touches concrete:
[IMG]https://farm1.staticflickr.com/580/21114915354_e6f9700fbc_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/yaRsGJ)

[IMG]https://farm1.staticflickr.com/629/21550766539_52366cd805_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/yQnj5k)

It was this stage where I informed my helpers that the planning phase had ended and we would now commence the figure-it-out-from-here phase:
[IMG]https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5632/21114913454_abe04f1e0b_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/yaRs8Y)

F-inlaw suggested we simply try lifting manually to see if that would be feasible, without using the cable "come-along" pullers.
[IMG]https://farm1.staticflickr.com/606/21550780489_7643d04ee6_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/yQnodR)
At this point I'm guessing the whole hull is well under 400 lbs, as the designed weight, including spars and sails should be 485lb. I have also removed the bunk flats/seat tops. Once it was mid-way, I took the opportunity to remove the centerboard. I discovered on a yahoo group thread that my CB pivot pipe was undersized, so I bought a proper one and will need to bore out the holes in the board and CB case.

A piece of blue foam under the rail allowed us to pivot and slide the bulky hull over the smooth concrete floor while protecting the ply edges.
[IMG]https://farm1.staticflickr.com/625/21726066992_40de3bf0dd_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/z6RLMW)

[IMG]https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5644/21746992561_47437eee98_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/z8H2eB)

MoMan
09-26-2015, 04:37 PM
I'm also adding a couple of pics as a cautionary tale to other builders. When I set up the build jig, I was fairly meticulous about checking everything for square and level. It was a solid structure, leveled and bolted into the concrete floor. Fast forward to this last week: I was getting ready to drill a pair of holes in the transom to attach my name board, but it didn't look quite right when the level told me it was parallel to the Earth's surface. I looked it over, checked the jig, checked the name board for parallel edges ... when I put the level on the bottom of the hull, it was off.
https://farm1.staticflickr.com/751/21116773053_e5f2477930_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/yb1YW2)
WTF???

It looks like when I attached the final profile under the transom, I let one edge droop slightly. I wedged a bottle jack under the low corner and lifted it up to where it was level: In the end, I introduced a twist of about 6-8 mm, or nearly 3/8". (The gap in this pic is slightly exaggerated because, between jacking up one corner and strapping down the opposite corner, the drywall screws holding the profile to the jig have gotten bent):
[IMG]https://farm1.staticflickr.com/765/21747147501_76ba8b664b_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/z8HPhZ)

Pretty sure there's not much I can do about it at this point since I'm not willing to start over. Just hoping it's not going to screw up the performance too much.

--Mike

MoMan
10-05-2015, 08:51 AM
I've been working on the undersides of the plank edges. They are actually in pretty good shape--better than I expected at least. I used a thin strip of western red cedar as a batten. It's hard to tell because I can't get a very good view from afar. I also took some time to tidy up the mess I made of the bow planking/bottom panel. I fitted a scrap of douglas fir on each side, then slathered them in thickened epoxy, trimming them down after curing. Now it looks proper. From there, I cleaned up old epoxy blobs surrounding the gap between the garboard and the bottom panel, then filled the gap with thickened epoxy. Next was to glass the gap. I unrolled my bias cut ribbon of 6oz cloth and started mixing epoxy. Plans call for 2 layers of cloth, and that stuff is thirsty. Looks like I may be ordering yet another gallon of epoxy. I also added a bead of 5200 to the CB case/bottom panel joint.

https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5767/21940829876_68ab9cd2c2_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/zqQujh)

https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5657/21780099999_b44ce5c740_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/zbCGVv)

https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5766/21976782341_b4189daa46_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/zu1KJn)

https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5723/21780093609_58d3661d1c_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/zbCF2k)



In other news, I found a trailer on Craig's list. It is a bargain, with a caveat: The original owner failed to properly rinse it after repeated salt dunkings. There are a couple of areas with significant rust, which I am going to look into having a welder replace. It was listed for $200. When I saw the rust, the guy dropped the price in half, so I got it for $100.

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/591/21344284454_8d15843067_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/yw839o)

https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5632/21954870872_230ddaecdc_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/zs5sdq)

Even if the entire trailer is worthless, I still got a bargain because it has 14" wheels. I checked around online and you can't find a replacement wheel with mounted tire for less than $124. So I can definitely get my investment back. I'll be happy if it lasts a couple of seasons, but I'm confident that the majority of it can be salvaged and made to last multiple years. It's shaped for a shallow V-hull, so I will need to come up with some modifications to accommodate my flat-bottomed hull.

I believe my next step will be sealing the remaining raw plywood (planks, bottom, seat tops and bunk flats) with CPES. After that, filets in the plank edges, round over edges, fair and paint.

--Mike

deke
10-05-2015, 08:03 PM
Looking good bro! Stem plans?

MoMan
10-25-2015, 04:07 PM
As good a time as any for an update. I've been obsessing over her lovely bottom for awhile now. Let's see, I've taped the bottom/garboard seam with 6oz glass tape, sealed all raw plywood with Smith's CPES, glassed the bottom and first 2 planks, filleted the plank edge undersides, radiused the plank edges, and now, have started fairing the hull.
https://farm1.staticflickr.com/603/22458465392_ab20c95400_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/Adzvjy)


https://farm1.staticflickr.com/714/22283879640_933f204cb4_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/zX9H4o)


In other news, the last of my birthday presents arrived yesterday:
[IMG]https://farm1.staticflickr.com/685/22277358860_47c2fe27ee_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/zWzhE9)

[IMG]https://farm1.staticflickr.com/726/22476412771_e8e7748b8b_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/Afaus8)

I've also started working on my stem cap. I resawed a chunk of cherry into four 48" long, 1/4" thick pieces of cherry. I marked out the stem shape on a piece of plywood and attached some 2X4 blocks to the stem profile. On another thread, I discovered a better method for steam bending wood. I found a roll of dental sterilization tubing for pretty cheap.

[IMG]https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5668/22277586608_7dc2b34f2f_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/zWAsmQ)

[IMG]https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5759/22277567778_569b4bc593_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/zWAmLb)

]

MoMan
10-25-2015, 04:13 PM
After steaming, it had a little springback, but nothing some adhesive and screws can't counteract:
[IMG]https://farm1.staticflickr.com/604/22451904272_c567888c95_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/AcZSVN)

And here are my plans for the skeg/surrounds.If my plan interpretation is accurate, these pieces should be 20mm thick by 30mm wide. Sound right to you??

[IMG]https://farm1.staticflickr.com/566/22482819191_f184b7c0d8_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/AfJjRD)

[IMG]https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5824/21844191763_d2e9ebc25c_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/zhicaV)

I'm closing in on painting. I have 2 quarts of Cape Hatteras offwhite Premium Yacht Enamel from Interlux. As soon as I attach the skeg/surrounds.

epoxyboy
10-27-2015, 02:49 AM
Looking good Mike, though I dont envy you the filling/fairing/painting/cussing at insects stuck in your paint stage :d.
If you haven't already drilled and sealed holes for the rudder hardware and the bow eye, you might want to so before painting - saves messing with your mirror finish paint job, and lets you soak a good dose of epoxy or whatever into the holes. I'm probably telling you how to suck eggs

Pete

MoMan
10-27-2015, 02:07 PM
Rudder hardware holes are drilled and sealed. I decided to wait to drill the bow eye holes until the stem cap is mounted, which I hope to tackle soon now that I have the laminations bent to shape. I have all next week off, so I hope to make some progress on hull fairing and maybe even start on spar construction. Just when I feel like I've made progress, I step back and realize how far I still have to go!

MoMan
11-04-2015, 08:55 PM
Progress continues slowly:

Some of my favorite measuring and marking tools:
https://farm1.staticflickr.com/711/22171196783_ce14f9a649_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/zMcbnv)

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/756/22373991858_095b209744_c.jpg

skeg: (white oak)
(https://flic.kr/p/A67yhj)https://farm1.staticflickr.com/643/22792338405_7f94a54511_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/AJ5G8P)

Stem to skeg:
(https://flic.kr/p/A67yhj)https://farm1.staticflickr.com/653/22766353906_c5b0205249_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/AFMvRd)

For perspective, here's a giant dog:
(https://flic.kr/p/A67yhj)https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5683/22604379420_3bdc87a1ae_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/ArtmtE)

(https://flic.kr/p/A67yhj)

deke
11-04-2015, 09:18 PM
Looking good brother! are you planning to use any bang strip? I've been looking at the brass half round at Jamestown and online metals. Online metals is definitely cheaper, but not sure about there quality, probably same stuff though. Daveys also has some high dollar bronze, $$.

MoMan
11-05-2015, 07:54 PM
no, just my sacrificial wood strips

MoMan
11-15-2015, 07:20 PM
OK, final fairing. I've learned that, at least for an amateur like me, fairing is never done. But I've reached the point where I'm not ready to invest any more in fairing compound and epoxy. I'm an 80% kind of guy, and at this stage I am happy with how her bottom looks.


https://farm1.staticflickr.com/637/23022054916_f6cd8f974a_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/B5o3Rj)





For my next build, I think I will go a simpler route for finishing ... like house paint.
https://farm1.staticflickr.com/748/23022137786_0218d7cf18_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/B5otu7)





Late afternoon boat building:
https://farm1.staticflickr.com/614/22426914953_33884c2a88_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/AaMNtt)




Bowsprit shaped. I wiped some mineral spirits on to see what that chunk of cherry might look like with Cetol on it.
https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5747/23048089995_9a4e93311f_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/B7FuaZ)


It feels smoother than it looks
https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5815/23034543712_6173c90bab_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/B6u4ko)

bluedog225
11-15-2015, 08:35 PM
Looking great.

deke
11-15-2015, 09:02 PM
Fairing and getting a good paint surface is a frustrating for me, I have to fight my perfectionism. Im like you, eventually you just have to call it good and move on. I have to remind myself after a few months of use, I probably won't even remember the imperfections I'm currently fretting over. As long as she looks good from a couple of feet I'll be happy.

My CLC dory took a good beating camping in the glades on a rocky shell beach one night, she got all scratched up the bottom and a little on the lower strake I had to laugh and shake my head when I saw the bottom when I pulled her out - I spent so many hours trying to make it perfectly smooth prior to painting.

Keep up the good work! Bow sprit looks great.

rgthom
11-15-2015, 09:19 PM
I spent some time fairing and painting the bottom of my Walkabout (first boat). If (when) I build another boat I won't spend time on that again. In very short order the bottom was gouged by trailer, rocks and snags, fouled by oil and scum in the water, and generally beaten up. I'm happy I glassed it the way you have for protection, but just a rough coat of paint will do.

Rick

MoMan
11-19-2015, 10:19 PM
Primer coat:
[IMG]https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5736/23170050121_d2195b3c9b_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/BisyEM)

Like most tasks done the first time, it was much easier than I expected. As for application, I wasn't sure if I'd bought enough. And just in case, I only mixed up 1/2 of the quart-sized batch. Glad I didn't mix the whole batch. I used the recommended high density foam rollers (4" mini size). On the first area, the garboard plank, I thought for sure I would run out by the first side, and certainly not enough to coat the entire hull. But as I continued to roll the foam roller back and forth, pigment kept coming out to color the surface. In fact, I ended up discarding a bit.

I rolled it pretty thin. My gut says that more (thicker) would not be any better and that this product is more of an adherent between the epoxy and the paint, just like primer that goes between drywall and paint.

Since I still have the interior to paint, I will used the second half of the unmixed batch for that. I'm only painting above deck; all surfaces already received 2 coats of unthickened epoxy.

MoMan
11-22-2015, 07:10 PM
It wasn't the progress I had planned for, but it was progress nevertheless.

I was all ready to brush on a coat of Premium Yacht Enamel until I read the label: the recommended thinner is Brushing Liquid 333. I hadn't planned on thinning my paint, but I do like to take care of my brushes. I also can't find any recommendations for the best type of brush. Based on other household alkyd-based enamel, I should use a nylon brush. Is that right??

Anyway, I don't have that proprietary Interlux chemical, and I can't justify a trip across town just for that.

So I moved on to Plan B: Steaming.
My outer stem is 4 pieces of laminated 1/4" cherry. Along each bow side, I will attach some 3/8" wide pieces of cherry trim, to form a better fitting appearance. So these all needed to be steamed into the same curve I used for the face pieces.
[IMG]https://farm1.staticflickr.com/682/22856332889_33a8e87712_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/APJFsZ)

I can't say enough good stuff about the sterilization tubing I found on a dental supply site. This is way better than the plywood steam box I constructed just before finding this in another thread. And cheaper!

I think I paid around $15 for a 100' roll of 6" diameter plastic film. It's reusable. Best of all, you can clamp your stock in situ while you steam it. Here's my basic setup:
[IMG]https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5785/22928492550_f3cb3ded42_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/AW7w25)

Turkey fryer, a cheap pot full of water, a plywood lid with a hole for some robust tubing and make a loose-fitting seal at each end. Heat to boiling. As the temp hits 200 or so, start easing the bend with clamps.

For my rubrails, the bag material is essential because I'm not using a jig, I need to carefully clamp the pieces in order to take the curves.
[IMG]https://farm1.staticflickr.com/643/22830145337_7746219e1d_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/AMqsPt)

Can you spot the major flaw in this steaming setup?

MoMan
11-23-2015, 09:10 AM
Can you spot the major flaw in this steaming setup?

OK, I won't keep you in suspense any longer. As I was reminded during steaming, a basic scientific principle of heat is, it rises. My set up was such that I was trying to push the steam downward, toward the bow. The steam didn't get very far, so I had to open the garage door and tackle this from the lower bow end.
https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5812/22928507970_73b30c18f8_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/AW7AAW)

This worked MUCH better. As the bag inflated with hot steam, it all moved upwards to the other end and the heat was evenly distributed along the whole length. I heated the two 3/4" thick rub rails for about 45 minutes, slowly tightening the clamps at the far end to gradually take the curve. I had to clamp them both to the port side because the anchor well cutout in the upside down deck afforded me the only place with a good clamping grip.

One other tip with the bag/tube steaming set up: make sure the path is unobstructed--no crimps or tight curves. At one point, my vinyl tubing dipped down, creating a pool of water that blocked the steam flow. A block of wood and an old plastic pitcher took care of that.

So now the stem is epoxied in place with screws and I'm ready to cut a scarf joint into these rub rail pieces. I also drilled holes for the bow eye/ bob stay attachment point. Hoping to paint very soon.
https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5754/22595887054_593dcd3d84_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/AqHPZy)

--Mike

Seth Wood
11-23-2015, 09:21 AM
Hey, this is EXACTLY how I plan to do the rubails (and coaming rail caps, for that matter) on my boat. Which is also a Pathfinder. What worries me is softening the epoxy on the hull-deck joint when clamping on the hot rails. Did you have this problem?

floatingkiwi
11-23-2015, 10:01 AM
There are many sailors at the bottom of the sea that are smarter than you or I.
That WERE smarter.

MoMan
11-23-2015, 02:59 PM
Another Pathfinder under construction?!? There's quite a fleet being built.



Hey, this is EXACTLY how I plan to do the rubails (and coaming rail caps, for that matter) on my boat. Which is also a Pathfinder. What worries me is softening the epoxy on the hull-deck joint when clamping on the hot rails. Did you have this problem?

It's a legitimate concern, but I didn't notice any issue. It didn't seem like there was a lot of heat transfer out of the bag, but when there is direct contact I guess there could be a problem. I think epoxy starts to soften at around 140F.

BobW
11-23-2015, 04:13 PM
Another Pathfinder under construction?!? There's quite a fleet being built.



At least five being built in the States now: Florida, Texas, Georgia, Virginia and Michigan. Any others?

MoMan
11-23-2015, 06:46 PM
At least five being built in the States now: Florida, Texas, Georgia, Virginia and Michigan. Any others?

There is actually a 2nd Pathfinder being built in the Houston area--a suburb closer to the coast. I met Kevin as I was starting mine; he was about 80% done but he doesn't post his progress anywhere that I know of.

JasonD
11-24-2015, 09:20 AM
It wasn't the progress I had planned for, but it was progress nevertheless.

I was all ready to brush on a coat of Premium Yacht Enamel until I read the label: the recommended thinner is Brushing Liquid 333. I hadn't planned on thinning my paint, but I do like to take care of my brushes. I also can't find any recommendations for the best type of brush. Based on other household alkyd-based enamel, I should use a nylon brush. Is that right??

Anyway, I don't have that proprietary Interlux chemical, and I can't justify a trip across town just for that.

So I moved on to Plan B: Steaming.
My outer stem is 4 pieces of laminated 1/4" cherry. Along each bow side, I will attach some 3/8" wide pieces of cherry trim, to form a better fitting appearance. So these all needed to be steamed into the same curve I used for the face pieces.
[IMG]https://farm1.staticflickr.com/682/22856332889_33a8e87712_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/APJFsZ)

I can't say enough good stuff about the sterilization tubing I found on a dental supply site. This is way better than the plywood steam box I constructed just before finding this in another thread. And cheaper!

I think I paid around $15 for a 100' roll of 6" diameter plastic film. It's reusable. Best of all, you can clamp your stock in situ while you steam it. Here's my basic setup:

Turkey fryer, a cheap pot full of water, a plywood lid with a hole for some robust tubing and make a loose-fitting seal at each end. Heat to boiling. As the temp hits 200 or so, start easing the bend with clamps.

For my rubrails, the bag material is essential because I'm not using a jig, I need to carefully clamp the pieces in order to take the curves.

Can you spot the major flaw in this steaming setup?

I'm curious, did the sheeting come in a circle / tube shape, so you only had to seal the ends? That's what I assume by "6 in diameter". If so, that is really convenient, as I imagine sealing the long edge would take a bit of folding/stapling/clamping(?) If not, what did you find worked well for sealing it up to keep the steam in?

MoMan
11-24-2015, 10:51 AM
I'm curious, did the sheeting come in a circle / tube shape, so you only had to seal the ends? That's what I assume by "6 in diameter". If so, that is really convenient, as I imagine sealing the long edge would take a bit of folding/stapling/clamping(?) If not, what did you find worked well for sealing it up to keep the steam in?

Yes, the material came as a 100' long tube -- like a really long bread bag. The ends are open. You don't want to seal the ends very tightly; Steam does NOT like being confined, and you don't want to be nearby when it violently escapes! I just stuffed a rag in the end: it let's the pressure build slightly, but doesn't prevent it from escaping.

Here is a previous thread (http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthread.php?195735-Heads-Up-for-a-good-steambox)with some really good info. Note that there are different types of bagging: my dental sterilization type is limited to 6", which so far is plenty big for me. But PaulF found some larger stuff from a food prep source.

epoxyboy
11-27-2015, 03:35 AM
Hi Mike, interesting to see the steaming - the plastic tube is a great idea.

Pete

MoMan
11-27-2015, 09:33 AM
Paint!!

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/708/22719010744_f57e174947_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/ABASnN)
This is the 2nd of at least 4 coats. Hatteras off-white enamel from Interlux. The first coat, I brushed straight on. It was very thin; almost like primer. The second coat, which I rolled on with a high density 4" roller, then brushed out, deepened the color significantly, but it is still thin.


I got to try out another new (to me) product that I'm excited about. At the plyWooden boat festival last month, just down the coast, I talked to Chuck Leinweber from DuckWorks. He was introducing these plastic StopLoss liquid storage bags, and I nabbed the last set he had brought to the show.
[IMG]https://farm1.staticflickr.com/612/23264814191_58f06345aa_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/BrQfJ4)

I naively gave my enamel a vigorous shake and opened the can. Just before pouring, I dipped a stir stick in and dragged it across the bottom of the can. I was quite surprised to discover a thick, nearly immovable layer of clay-like sludge. Clearly, shaking this stuff does NOT mix it properly. And that sludge is mostly what I'm paying a premium for. So I stirred and stirred until everything went into suspension, then carefully poured it into the bag via the funnel.

Besides reducing the amount of oxidation, these bags make it really convenient to dispense small amounts as needed. I can literally meter out enough to fill a thimble, without any mess or loss. I plan to store my marine varnish in these also.

MoMan
12-23-2015, 10:22 PM
Huh ... I didn't realize it has been nearly a month since I updated my build. OK. Well, I finished painting the bottom; or at least applied as much paint as I am willing to donate to the bottom, which will be scraped to hell on day one.


Then, I called my in-laws for another flip. FIL is retired and BIL is between petroleum jobs, so they were more than happy for a mini adventure.
We flipped the hull in about 15 minutes, then stood around shooting the sh!t.

I couldn't resist setting the bowsprit in place and clamping on one of the already-machined rubrail pieces
[IMG][IMG]https://farm1.staticflickr.com/620/23624329051_1e60561599_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/BZARY8)

I must confess, I'm quite happy so far.

Next up was shaping the outer stem. I decided I wanted a slight overhang as opposed to making it flush with the planks. I don't know why, I just did. And I like it.
[IMG]https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1486/23828474722_777d2daece_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/CiDan5)

Not sure if this is how the rub rails would traditionally meet the stem, but it's OK with me. Besides, the bowsprit will be at the top of this junction, so it's not so in-your-face. I still may soften that transition with a less severe angle for the rub rail.

Another little detail I've decided on is some hardwood trim for the anchor well on the foredeck. No real justifiable reason as the plans do not call for it; I just thought it was a nice way to dress up an otherwise abrupt hole in the deck. I suppose it does help protect the plywood edges of the well. If I decide I hate it, it won't be difficult to shave it off.
[IMG]https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5656/23568882179_cda633e4ae_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/BUGFxz)

It is cherry-- the same as the outer stem, bowsprit and rubrails. I simply glued up a triangular assembly of half-lapped pieces, then trimmed them down to size and rounded over with a router bit and epoxied in place. I think I showed earlier that I started with a plywood prototype. Oh yeah, I had to sand in the camber of the deck before it would sit flush with the deck.

Last Sunday, I got the port side rubrail attached. In a moment of brilliance, I also concluded that it would be most efficient to also attach that anchor well trim at the same time. The result was a full vocabulary of sailor terminology and a number of clamps thrown in anger. But the glue was curing and the deed was in motion, and it eventually worked out. For the starboard side, I am making more preparations as to how exactly I will clamp it. A triangular wedge scrap will help the jaws of the clamps grip things, and my bicycle tube clamps will act as a third hand to hold the piece horizontally.

[IMG]https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1701/23308532614_698ce1d334_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/BvGjFY)

https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5818/23568888519_ee8969a8de_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/BUGHqT)

Tomorrow (Christmas eve) is a half-day at the office, so I should be able to glue and screw the starboard side.

Tonight, I also solved another dilemma I created for myself. When I bought my bow eye/bobstay attachment hardware, it was the perfect length. Then I went and added the 1" thick outer stem. D'oh! My extra long u-bolt made it through all the stem material, but the threads appeared just below the surface of the stem, which is now buried behind bulkhead 1, accessible only via a 6" hatch. I needed some way to trim about a 1/2" from the interior of that inner stem. After contemplating the issue all day on a slow day at work, I decided to try a 1 1/2" spade bit, attached to a drill bit extension. It was sloppy, but it worked. I uncovered just enough of the threads to lock on a nylon locking nut.
[IMG]https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1441/23910653326_39b60d2f84_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/CqUmcy)

If I had it to do over again, I would have drilled the bow eye holes before planking. Or at least drilled pilot holes to guide me later.

--Mike

epoxyboy
12-24-2015, 12:17 AM
Hi Mike,

Merry Christmas and all the best to you and yours for the new year. We are looking forward to a calm sunny mid-twenties (celcius) bbq Christmas day in this part of the world. One sleep to go :-)
I love you anchor well trim - very classy. You must be looking at a splash some time in '16, at the rate you're going.

Pete

MoMan
12-24-2015, 05:43 AM
Hi Mike,

Merry Christmas and all the best to you and yours for the new year. We are looking forward to a calm sunny mid-twenties (celcius) bbq Christmas day in this part of the world. One sleep to go :-)
I love you anchor well trim - very classy. You must be looking at a splash some time in '16, at the rate you're going.

Pete

Thanks Pete, and a Merry Christmas to you! Yes, I'm planning to take Crucible on next June's Texas 200 and I want enough time to get some experience at the helm. The only big stuff left includes spars, coaming, paint, rigging and trailer mods. I suppose I should order my sails and motor soon also, but I have 2 upcoming ski trips to pay for first. It sucks to be me!

Rik van der Vaart
12-24-2015, 11:04 AM
Mike,
Good call on the anchor well trim. In practice that thin ply gets a beating with the chains rattling along it, all wet and scrapy. At least for the outer side I will make some sort of trim now I see your example.
Looking good.
Rik

MoMan
12-27-2015, 10:15 PM
I've seen a lot of epoxy tips since I've gotten interested in boat building, and I won't repeat them all here. But my number one tip for other amateurs like me, which I haven't seen frequently, is this:

Before you start mixing and spreading, soak a rag or two in some distilled white vinegar. It's WAY better than cleaning up with volatile solvents like lacquer thinner. Wipe your expensive (as well as the cheapos) tools off before the epoxy settles into the triggers and crevices and cures. I wish I'd done this 2 boats ago. Also, wipe your latex/nitrile gloves off and you might get another use out of them. And when you're done with the rag, feel free to wad it up in a ball: no worries about spontaneous combustion. Wipe off any smears on your arms, legs, face, etc.: no worries about absorbing nasty, toxic chemicals. And wiping away extra drips and blobs before they cure will save you lots of effort of sanding hardened epoxy.

MoMan
12-29-2015, 09:19 AM
Here's a good shot of my favorite free clamps (bike tubes) in action:https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1602/24019024256_58165c82bf_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/CAtM6S)

Just a word of warning: old bike tubes often contain liquid flat-fixing chemicals. You don't want that crap to drip onto any wood for your boat. No telling how it might stain or interfere with your finish.

Otherwise, I've found numerous creative ways to clamp stuff where traditional clamps won't work well.

Rub rails are all scarfed, glued and screwed in place. Just need to clean up the scarfs and round over the edges.

--Mike

deke
12-29-2015, 10:01 PM
Awesome! Visually, I think the rub rails make a big difference. So are you gonna add brass strip? I epoxied my rub rail, so I plan on them being pretty much permanent, but I'm going to add a replaceable "strip", for me brass, so the permanent epoxied wood doesn't get banged up.

I don't have this feature on my dory, it's just a expoxied wood rub rail, and as long as I use adequate bumpers I've been ok.

32' of brass 1/2 brass strip is about $160 from online metals.

Ive been off my build for a week and it will be another week before I get back from this trip. I have to say that this stage of boat building is pretty exciting, I can see the light!

MoMan
01-04-2016, 03:42 PM
Awesome! Visually, I think the rub rails make a big difference. So are you gonna add brass strip?

No brass strip for me. I will keep it solid wood. I guess if it gets REALLY beat up, I can either add a veneer strip or [gulp] cut off the old and put a new one on. That wouldn't be a big deal if it weren't for the stainless steel screws, which are also mostly set in epoxy. But let's not think about that. I would think that with moderate care and reasonable seamanship, the wooden rub rails should last the life of the boat.

One thing I am doing a little different than most of the Pathfinders I've seen is that my lower, smaller rub rail won't extend the full length of the hull. I was inspired by Pete's (epoxyboy) cabin version and I really like it. I will also taper the ends to make it look a bit lighter. That does change the color scheme: you can't have the sheer plank a different color than the rest of the hull. So my hull will be solid off-white. I think it will look pretty classy. For the interior, I am leaning toward a Navy battleship gray. I can't handle white unless I also wear a welder's helmet for the blinding light.

https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3911/14701111001_171f30981e_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/op6384)

I will extend the aft portion a little bit further than Pete did, but this is pretty close to what I have in mind.

To give the whole thing a bit of color, I am now leaning toward tanbark sails. Ordering sails is on my short list. I think I will be steaming, then gluing up my tiller blank soon also.

MoMan
01-09-2016, 07:06 PM
Wow, I'm right on schedule according to my last post. I ordered my tanbark sails yesterday. $1300 from Duckworks. I went a little high end: 5 oz with 3 rows of reef points and some telltales. I also have some other new deadlines biting me in the ass: After accepting my friend Bruce's request to crew for me, I booked my room in Port Isabel for the TX 200. I also applied steam to my laminations for my tiller.

Here's the set up. Again, the sterilization tubing makes life so much easier.

https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1717/23652010174_aa8a7fbf71_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/C33JAS)


Lots o' clamps
https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1694/24280248475_628fc64c3f_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/CZyBXH)


All cherry laminations with 2 strips of basswood in the middle for some bling:
https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1469/24197705431_35073c63a6_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/CSgyMM)



Here's an error: I should have rounded off the hard corner on this clamping block. It ended up crushing the wood. Oh well, I have a lot of shaping ahead once it's glued up.
https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1658/24280238705_8742171a1f_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/CZyz4g)

I I also glued in the bungs for the countersunk screws for the main rub rails. I think there were about 40 total. These will be oiled.
https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1602/23984647460_2293478da2_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/CxrA5u)

The mailman delivered the 3/16" 316 stainless steel chain which will serve as my bobstay. It looks good.



But enough of boat building. Tonight I will be snuggling up with these two babes for a movie and some fireplace warmth on a chilly (for Houston) Saturday night:
https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1610/23984622240_38b3208afb_b.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/CxrszE)

--Mike

MoMan
01-20-2016, 10:51 PM
Wow, that was easy!
https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1610/24485410106_de15587a8e_z.jpg
(https://flic.kr/p/DiG8nd)
https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1458/24511597415_124eed86ca_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/Dm1kWx)

OK, so my exclamation is a touch premature. These are actually test pieces of clear white pine. But holy crap, they came out pretty much perfect on my first run through. The pine is right at 19 mm thick. After running it thru the table saw to cut it down to 37mm wide, I moved the saw fence to the left hand side of the blade (right tilt Unisaw), tilted it 45 degrees and lowered it to my pencil marks. Ran it thru twice then divided the single stave into 8 pieces. Yeah.

I also worked on my mast steps tonight. Main step is done and mizzen step is mostly marked out and ready to cut. I used a chunk of 8/4 cherry. I hope I'm not risking a split by using a single block of hardwood. These do get glued and screwed to the floor which should help avoid it. Replacing them will be a small hassle.
https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1587/24511607205_57e911699a_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/Dm1oRk)

I even had an excuse to dust off my seldom-used mortiser.
https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1716/23884798373_140494c9b4_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/CoBQqv)

The tiller is looking better too. I trimmed off the outer strip that got crushed against the bending form.
[IMG]https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1699/24403313672_0ecb48e2f9_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/DbrmXs)

You can also see the bungs of the main rub rail has been trimmed down. I'm mostly very happy with these rub rails, with the exception of my scarf joints. More specifically, the glue lines along the face. If these were getting painted they would be perfect, but I plan to oil them, and the elongated glue line on the face is going to show even more than now. Not sure if there is anything to do, and I'm reluctant to experiment. Removing more material will just expose more glue line. I may try a cabinet scraper to remove some glue. I wonder if a nibbed scarf would have prevented this? I still have the lower, narrower rub rails to do, so maybe I'll try that.

I also drilled holes for the 3/8" (9mm) bolts to attached the bow sprit. And with the bolts holding it in place, I could hook up the bob stay, which is 3/16" stainless steel chain. I think it looks pretty sharp. Unfortunately I neglected to take pix while I had it all connected, and I have to disconnect it all in order to close the garage door. That's about it for now. I am on the verge of steaming the coaming pieces (mahogany) which will also need to be scarfed in situ. First I will need to work everything out with some cheapo template material.

--Mike

epoxyboy
01-21-2016, 12:21 AM
One thing I am doing a little different than most of the Pathfinders I've seen is that my lower, smaller rub rail won't extend the full length of the hull. I was inspired by Pete's (epoxyboy) cabin version and I really like it. I will also taper the ends to make it look a bit lighter. That does change the color scheme: you can't have the sheer plank a different color than the rest of the hull. So my hull will be solid off-white. I think it will look pretty classy. For the interior, I am leaning toward a Navy battleship gray. I can't handle white unless I also wear a welder's helmet for the blinding light.

https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3911/14701111001_171f30981e_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/op6384)

I will extend the aft portion a little bit further than Pete did, but this is pretty close to what I have in mind.

You owe that piece of inspiration partly to the only scarph I did that may have exhibited sub-optimal structural performance when getting twisted in three directions at once :cool:.
Once I was done cussing and cut way the split ends of the failed join, the options were to buy and mill a whole nother plank, or go for even shorter back and sides than I originally planned.
I definitely agree that carrying it back (and maybe forward) another 12 - 18" would look better. That is closer to the way I intended it to be - it was meant to go almost as far as that swirly bit of ply between rubrails that JW draws in on all his boats, that I left off because I dont like the look of it.

Pete

john welsford
01-24-2016, 02:13 AM
Good idea, I should put a note to that effect in the building guide.
Its one of those things that I do without thinking but its so much a part of what I do that its hard to remember that others dont have the same experience to guide them.
Nice job, keep up the good work.
Numbers? We've sold around 60 sets of plans in the USA, sadly not all builders keep in touch but there are at least half that number being built.

John Welsford



Huh ... I didn't realize it has been nearly a month since I updated my build. OK. Well, I finished painting the bottom; or at least applied as much paint as I am willing to donate to the bottom, which will be scraped to hell on day one.


Then, I called my in-laws for another flip. FIL is retired and BIL is between petroleum jobs, so they were more than happy for a mini adventure.
We flipped the hull in about 15 minutes, then stood around shooting the sh!t.

I couldn't resist setting the bowsprit in place and clamping on one of the already-machined rubrail pieces
[IMG][IMG]https://farm1.staticflickr.com/620/23624329051_1e60561599_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/BZARY8)

I must confess, I'm quite happy so far.

Next up was shaping the outer stem. I decided I wanted a slight overhang as opposed to making it flush with the planks. I don't know why, I just did. And I like it.
[IMG]https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1486/23828474722_777d2daece_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/CiDan5)

Not sure if this is how the rub rails would traditionally meet the stem, but it's OK with me. Besides, the bowsprit will be at the top of this junction, so it's not so in-your-face. I still may soften that transition with a less severe angle for the rub rail.

Another little detail I've decided on is some hardwood trim for the anchor well on the foredeck. No real justifiable reason as the plans do not call for it; I just thought it was a nice way to dress up an otherwise abrupt hole in the deck. I suppose it does help protect the plywood edges of the well. If I decide I hate it, it won't be difficult to shave it off.
[IMG]https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5656/23568882179_cda633e4ae_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/BUGFxz)

It is cherry-- the same as the outer stem, bowsprit and rubrails. I simply glued up a triangular assembly of half-lapped pieces, then trimmed them down to size and rounded over with a router bit and epoxied in place. I think I showed earlier that I started with a plywood prototype. Oh yeah, I had to sand in the camber of the deck before it would sit flush with the deck.

Last Sunday, I got the port side rubrail attached. In a moment of brilliance, I also concluded that it would be most efficient to also attach that anchor well trim at the same time. The result was a full vocabulary of sailor terminology and a number of clamps thrown in anger. But the glue was curing and the deed was in motion, and it eventually worked out. For the starboard side, I am making more preparations as to how exactly I will clamp it. A triangular wedge scrap will help the jaws of the clamps grip things, and my bicycle tube clamps will act as a third hand to hold the piece horizontally.

[IMG]https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1701/23308532614_698ce1d334_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/BvGjFY)

https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5818/23568888519_ee8969a8de_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/BUGHqT)

Tomorrow (Christmas eve) is a half-day at the office, so I should be able to glue and screw the starboard side.

Tonight, I also solved another dilemma I created for myself. When I bought my bow eye/bobstay attachment hardware, it was the perfect length. Then I went and added the 1" thick outer stem. D'oh! My extra long u-bolt made it through all the stem material, but the threads appeared just below the surface of the stem, which is now buried behind bulkhead 1, accessible only via a 6" hatch. I needed some way to trim about a 1/2" from the interior of that inner stem. After contemplating the issue all day on a slow day at work, I decided to try a 1 1/2" spade bit, attached to a drill bit extension. It was sloppy, but it worked. I uncovered just enough of the threads to lock on a nylon locking nut.
[IMG]https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1441/23910653326_39b60d2f84_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/CqUmcy)

If I had it to do over again, I would have drilled the bow eye holes before planking. Or at least drilled pilot holes to guide me later.

--Mike

Paul G.
01-24-2016, 05:21 AM
Heres a radical suggestion, fill in the foredeck hole for the anchor and use a bucket in the cockpit instead! There are a couple of reasons, the first is that you only need a small anchor and that is easily handled, deploying to from the cockpit is actually easier than form the bow. This gives several advantages, 1. less weight up front and more down low means the boat will be more stable and sail better especially to windward in chop, and 2. you can then make a locker out of the front to put in lightweight gear like sleeping bags and stuff you want to keep super dry.

Just a thought!

cracked lid
01-24-2016, 12:44 PM
You can also see the bungs of the main rub rail has been trimmed down. I'm mostly very happy with these rub rails, with the exception of my scarf joints. More specifically, the glue lines along the face. If these were getting painted they would be perfect, but I plan to oil them, and the elongated glue line on the face is going to show even more than now. Not sure if there is anything to do, and I'm reluctant to experiment. Removing more material will just expose more glue line. I may try a cabinet scraper to remove some glue. I wonder if a nibbed scarf would have prevented this? I still have the lower, narrower rub rails to do, so maybe I'll try that.


I found nibbed scarfs do a much better job of hiding the glue line. They take a bit longer to make, but are worth the effort if you're leaving it bright. Make your nib as deep as the radius you intend to round over on the edge or you'll still have that thick glue line at the edge.

MoMan
02-07-2016, 09:51 PM
Some success followed by a dose of failure. Let's address the positives first. I've dry fitted my smaller, lower rub rails. I love them! I tapered the ends to make them a little lighter. As previously mentioned, I plan to oil these along with the bow stem, etc.

https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1457/24879119085_eec5e923fe_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/DUtZk4)

https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1536/24250456884_c70e2787c8_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/CWVVXA)

https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1513/24760697962_7a80d33100_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/DJ23Ry)

https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1659/24760697712_6f723c35bf_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/DJ23Mf)

Obviously I still have some touch up work to do. But this certainly offers a good view of where we are headed.

Another positive in my day was tackling the staves for the birds mouth mast:
https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1506/24518062399_51aff9c137_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/DmztKM)

I dropped in to one of my lumber yards last Thursday at lunch and blew about 1/2 of my paycheck on some vertical grain Douglas Fir. They only had 8/4 in stock, so it took quite a few passes through the table saw to arrive at this point. I still need to construct a jig to work a taper in to the final output.

https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1505/24792286211_12f0e64b0d_z.jpg

(https://flic.kr/p/DLNWWx)

Next up: my failure.

MoMan
02-07-2016, 10:07 PM
Early on in my build, I decided I wanted to make the coaming one of those fancy-finished parts. The plans call for 9mm ply, but I decided to splurge and buy some mahogany. On the bandsaw, I sliced it down to the same dimensions as the plans. To make it fit the curve of the sheer line, I decided to steam my lumber. I do have a bit of experience steaming, so I figured this would be semi-routine. I figured wrong.

I used my same tried and true steaming set up
[IMG]https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1536/24257513614_e78178948d_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/CXy6Fm)

[IMG]https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1477/24258791033_4fe5bb4bc2_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/CXEDpP)

The problem, I've decided, is that I tried to force the wood down edge-wise, versus laying it on its face. The result was, it came out wavier than a lays potato chip:
[IMG]https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1652/24767773712_7a4ebac0e3_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/DJDjef)
I have effectively ruined two 3/8" thick planks of mahogany. Probably 8' long. Sickening. I suppose it could be worse, but that's no consolation. Not sure what I will do now. Go to the plans-specified plywood? Risk more mahogany? I don't know. If I know me, I will stew over the solution over several beers. Sounds good to me.

MoMan
02-07-2016, 10:10 PM
I found nibbed scarfs do a much better job of hiding the glue line. They take a bit longer to make, but are worth the effort if you're leaving it bright. Make your nib as deep as the radius you intend to round over on the edge or you'll still have that thick glue line at the edge.

Yes, I really like the results of my nibbed scarf. It didn't necessarily conceal the glue line, but it came out much cleaner.

ulav8r
02-07-2016, 11:26 PM
Re-steam those coaming boards and clamp them to a form to correct the shape. After they dry, glue them up clamped to the form to set the shape permanently.

MoMan
02-08-2016, 10:36 AM
Re-steam those coaming boards and clamp them to a form to correct the shape. After they dry, glue them up clamped to the form to set the shape permanently.

Thanks, I'll give it a go since I have nothing to lose. I did fail to note that I also introduced a bit of cupping; not sure if a form will take that out.

deke
02-08-2016, 05:50 PM
If you don't end up using the mahagony for the gunnel, maybe you could repurpose it for interior trim.

MoMan
02-12-2016, 11:01 PM
Re-steam those coaming boards and clamp them to a form to correct the shape. After they dry, glue them up clamped to the form to set the shape permanently.

Here goes!

I need to apply pressure in 2 directions: push into the form blocks and keep the face flat. I took a 2X4 and cut a groove into it to fit a 3/4" thick scrap of ply:
https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1463/24359269224_cd7e00e175_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/D7xC5q)

(https://flic.kr/p/D7xC5q)https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1713/24871861252_de43aa1ea0_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/DTQMQ1)

Crank up the turkey fryer and
(https://flic.kr/p/D7xC5q)https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1655/24694344950_4824721ce4_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/DC9Yq7)

gimmee some steam:
https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1535/24896572191_b72f74bb7c_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/DW2rwF)


(https://flic.kr/p/D7xC5q)

MoMan
02-12-2016, 11:15 PM
Here's a little tool I was sure would be a novelty
[IMG]https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1696/24989869885_450dbbe33a_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/E5gBFB)]

It has actually turned out to be useful.
[IMG]https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1660/24989854145_b30db6f8b4_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/E5gx1e)

It confirms that my steam is actually hot enough

Incidentally, while I do love the autoclave bagging for steaming, you should know that the bag cannot be touching the material to be steamed. You need a "pillow" of air between the lumber and the bag. This allows the steam to come in contact with the wood. If your bag material sticks to the wood, there is little to no heating taking place.

Another consideration: plan for condensation. The steam will condense and pool. Then you will have a puddle of near-boiling water to deal with.

Anyway, here's what the operation looks like from afar:

[IMG]https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1562/24896569241_ebebcb7fe4_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/DW2qDP)

[IMG]https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1539/24622247189_6b75ee9f3a_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/DvMsgg)

I could have done a better job of prepping my clamps, and ended up re-re-steaming them. It was a bit like wack-a-mole, with new bends popping up here and there, requiring more clamps. I am leaving everything clamped up overnight tonight. We'll see if anything is usable tomorrow.

--Mike

MoMan
02-13-2016, 08:03 AM
Just went out to remove the bag. That is one more consideration regarding the bag: The wood won't dry until you remove it, and removing it means unclamping everything. Alternatively, I have simply sliced the bag off and thrown it away, but I also like to reuse it.

Anyway, things look much better. A little crushing of the fibers where the blocks are, but I plan to round over the corners anyway. So I reclamped it all and will leave it to dry for awhile.

MoMan
02-13-2016, 05:47 PM
Success, I believe!

I let the piece dry in the form with a fan blowing on it all day. Just now I transferred it from the form to clamping it in place. With a bit of coaxing, it should conform nicely to the final fit.

For the original steaming operation, I did both starboard and port at the same time. I think it's better to do them one at a time. The main reason is that the steam only gets to one side: the bag is only 6" diameter, and these coaming planks are a hair over 5", so there just isn't enough room to separate them. The other issue is clamps: I only got so many of the kind I need.

[IMG]https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1561/24376937994_0f25d7c932_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/D97boo)

[IMG]https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1682/24981221716_b8d0dc2988_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/E4vhTf)

I'm much happier!

I am still struggling with the forward section of coaming: the one that transitions from the cockpit to the forward deck, forming a V above the kingplank. I've been toying with a variety of pattern pieces that will hopefully save me from wasting some mahogany. We'll see.

epoxyboy
02-14-2016, 01:42 AM
Nice job, and a great recovery! I hate that "I've just bollixed up $$$ worth of timber" feeling.

Pete