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asloth
02-24-2014, 10:03 AM
Seems that the new SoF ROWBOATS-design is getting a lot of constructions questions, pics and information exchange, so this thread might carry some of that load.

Lately talk of bumps w/ lashing. I found information in Robert Morris' book, Jeff Horton's Kudzu website (he has or had an excellent lashing video) and many others I've forgotten. They suggest notching the stringers to reduce the bumps so as to avoid abrasion. I don't use any glue/epoxy over my lashing for protection/strength. They're covered by the skin on outside. And as others have mentioned lashing has its own strong advantages and supporters. Plus it looks striking.

Steve C.
blindeyeboats

Ben Fuller
02-24-2014, 04:44 PM
One slashing schemes that the Greenlanders use that produce no lumps. Namely a small hole drilled underneath each rib in the stringers. Hole needs to be able to be big enough for two passes of line. The lashing is then a wicked tight V lashing and the lashing string can be something as basic as seine twine. A six foot length does about 3-4 frames worth depending on spacing. This has added advantage of being able to replace a lashing without needing reskinning.

asloth
02-25-2014, 07:49 PM
One slashing schemes that the Greenlanders use that produce no lumps. Namely a small hole drilled underneath each rib in the stringers. Hole needs to be able to be big enough for two passes of line. The lashing is then a wicked tight V lashing and the lashing string can be something as basic as seine twine. A six foot length does about 3-4 frames worth depending on spacing. This has added advantage of being able to replace a lashing without needing reskinning.

Ben, After reading above, I looked up the lashing section in Cunningham's Greenland Kayak book to better understand. He doesn't show the above technique. Could you give a bit more detail? Is this used currently and w/ deeply notched frames? And a small hole is placed in bottom of each stringer to allow the two passes of line? Must be somewhat at an angle if re-lashing w/o skin removal is possible. Sorry for my slow to understand questions, but seems something I would use in future.

Steve C.

rgthom
02-25-2014, 08:15 PM
Steve,

Could you post a list of books you recommend to someone just learning SOF? I see several referenced in the two threads now running, but a list of your favorites including where to get them (if known) would be great.

Thanks - Rick

Ben Fuller
02-26-2014, 06:48 AM
Ben, After reading above, I looked up the lashing section in Cunningham's Greenland Kayak book to better understand. He doesn't show the above technique. Could you give a bit more detail? Is this used currently and w/ deeply notched frames? And a small hole is placed in bottom of each stringer to allow the two passes of line? Must be somewhat at an angle if re-lashing w/o skin removal is possible. Sorry for my slow to understand questions, but seems something I would use in future.

Steve C.

Cunningham does not show this and indeed it might be a method worked out in the 20th century with the easy availability of seine twine. I'll see if I can sketch it; right now the qajaq where I used it is buried until spring. The Qajaq USA forum may have some pictures. There are no notches in the stringers or ribs. When you look at the stringer from the side you see a V. The rib is at the top of the V and the hole is in the stringer about half way down and goes straight across. If the stringer has a vertical dimension of say 1" the hole is 1/2" down and directly across under the center of the rib. When you look at top of the rib you see two parallel lines of lashing , =, and the lashing line runs from one rib to the next alternating sides. =_= then up =_= etc.

Paul Scheuer
02-26-2014, 11:16 AM
A sketchwould help.
Let me try aword picture.
If I visualizethe intersection of the rib and stringer as it would appear from inside theboat, with the boat right side up.
The ribwould be vertical.
Behind itwould be the horizontal stringer.
Thecontacting surfaces would be a rectangle.

For thepurpose of defining the lashing, the points of the rectangle are
Upper left is A
Upper right is C
Upper midpoint (between A and C) is B
Lower left is D
Lower Right is F
Lower midpoint (between D and F) is E.

I’ll try – Check me if I missed it.
1. The hole is vertical from B to E.
2. The lashing cord goes over the exposed front ofthe rib at A to C.
3. Both end of the cord goes back to the hole at B.
4. Both ends go through the hole to E.
5. Both ends go over the front of the rib at D andF.
There may be an extra turn or two around the rib at steps 2and 5, to keep the cord located, and maybe a turn around the rectangle to snug the lashing.
The knot is at the exposed surface of the rib, at either theA-C or D-F location.

I like the idea of being able to repair a rib withoutremoving the skin.

Osbert
02-26-2014, 11:25 AM
I really need to get a relevant book, but until I do can someone explain how the fabric and gunwales go together? And how the gunwales and the frames work? I'm thinking of building a sof lhf17 with ply frames.

Thanks!

Canoez
02-26-2014, 11:30 AM
I really need to get a relevant book, but until I do can someone explain how the fabric and gunwales go together? And how the gunwales and the frames work? I'm thinking of building a sof lhf17 with ply frames.

Thanks!

You have some choices. You could simply staple the fabric to the gunwales and cover with a rub-rail on the outside to hide the staples. Alternatively, you could drill a series of holes and stitch the fabric to the gunwales. If you go with the Platt Monfort school of thought, there are also some thermally activated adhesive tapes that can be used to bond the fabric to the gunwales.

As far as the joinery that I've seen, the gunwales themselves are typically bonded or lashed to "tabs" that are part of the plywood frames. They are a sandwich of an inwale, and outwale and scupper blocks that go between them.

asloth
02-26-2014, 01:04 PM
Steve,

Could you post a list of books you recommend to someone just learning SOF? I see several referenced in the two threads now running, but a list of your favorites including where to get them (if known) would be great.

Thanks - Rick

Books on SoF building. I’m aware of two types of SoF construction, traditional and non-traditional or fuselage framed. Traditional uses bent ribs closely spaced to support stringers, while fuselage frame uses plywood frames w/ wider spacing for stringer support. These are the ones I have and use, but by no means all that’s available.

Traditional (bent ribs):
“Building The Greenland Kayak” Christopher Cunningham 2003. While focused on Greenland kayaks, lots of info I’ve found very useful for SoF rowboats

“Building Skin-On-Frame Boats” Robert Morris 2001, out of print and pricey. Again focused on SoF kayak building altho has info/plans for rowboats and canoes.

“Umiak, An Illustrated Guide” Skip Snaith 1997, also out of print and pricey. Contemporary construction of traditional umiaks, row/paddle boats of the Arctic Circle.
Lots of information/ideas for SoF rowboats here. Skip suggests the Swampscott Dory as a good model for designing/building a umiak/rowboat today.

Of these three, only “Building the Greenland Kayak” is reasonably priced on Amazon.

Non-Traditional (Fuselage Frame)
“More Fuselage Frame Boats” Jeff Horton 2012. Jeff designs, builds, and sells kits for many SoF kayaks w/ a few rowboats and canoes. There are two rowboat plans w/ construction information in this book. His earlier book, “Fuselage Frame Boats” has construction info for kayaks and a canoe. Jeff's two books are available thru his website Kudzu.

*****
These are the few books I refer to for SoF rowboat building, along w/ the kayak websites, Yost, Kayak Forum and Qajaq USA- Greenland Kayaking Forum.
As you can see the major source of SoF information available is focused on kayaks.I adapt what’s there for my building of SoF rowboats. An opportunity to be creative w/ many learning mistakes made along the way to a launch.
What other information sources are available not listed here?

Steve Chambers
blindeyeboats

Kudzu
02-26-2014, 08:54 PM
A little late to the party but I will share my thoughts. Seeing the lashings through the skin is just part of the SoF construction. I do notch the keel to keep the lashing hidden but not for cosmetic reasons, but because the keel takes the most abuse and if you don't notch it the lashings are the low point. Therefore they are hit over and over and that is where you will rub a hole in the skin.

Once you get rid of those, the bow becomes the new spot to worry about. So I am now using a small piece of brass oval as a rub strip on the bow of all my new boats.

As for the gunwales, I just pull the skin tight and staple it in place and cover it with a rub strip. I suggest making a a guide to make sure you locate the staples consistently. I think small rub strips look better and they don't cover much.

Canoez
02-26-2014, 09:01 PM
LTNS, Jeff - what's have you been up to?

Ben Fuller
02-27-2014, 09:29 AM
A sketchwould help.
Let me try aword picture.
If I visualizethe intersection of the rib and stringer as it would appear from inside theboat, with the boat right side up.
The ribwould be vertical.
Behind itwould be the horizontal stringer.
Thecontacting surfaces would be a rectangle.

For thepurpose of defining the lashing, the points of the rectangle are
Upper left is A
Upper right is C
Upper midpoint (between A and C) is B
Lower left is D
Lower Right is F
Lower midpoint (between D and F) is E.

I’ll try – Check me if I missed it.
1. The hole is vertical from B to E.
2. The lashing cord goes over the exposed front ofthe rib at A to C.
3. Both end of the cord goes back to the hole at B.
4. Both ends go through the hole to E.
5. Both ends go over the front of the rib at D andF.
There may be an extra turn or two around the rib at steps 2and 5, to keep the cord located, and maybe a turn around the rectangle to snug the lashing.
The knot is at the exposed surface of the rib, at either theA-C or D-F location.

I like the idea of being able to repair a rib withoutremoving the skin.

You have mostly got it except that three or four lashings would be done with the same cord. And that only one end is used for lacing. When starting the non working end is knotted and caught in a lashing turn. So you might start with an knot that would be caught with an extra turn, a knot at A, a round turn around back to A that would catch the knot then the pattern below. Finish of a section would be a couple of half hitches around a rib.

When you look at the top of the rib you will see two rows of parallel lashing running AC and DF. So with the lashing line coming from the left top it would cross the frame A-C then duck down and go thru the stringer BE. Now you have a choice as to whether you want to go to D or F. As I recall the first pass would go to F then D, back to E to B then up to A and repeat to C then B-E. Now you go to D then to F then to the next rib so that the lashing thread alternates sides between frames. You end up with two parallel lashing lines, .....A-C , and D-F.... with three going thru the hole. This was hard to deconstruct as todays Greenlanders might put some clear finish on the frame which pretty much fused the lashings together and made deconstructing hard. One of the things I liked about this was never having to deal with more than about an arm spans length of lashing line. There was also an effort made to "overlap" the sections. That is I suspect that the keel was lashed first, then the stringers. The stringer line sections matched side to side but the sections overlapped the start stops of the sections on the keel.

Hope that this helps.

asloth
02-27-2014, 08:06 PM
Following directions/instructions for the No-Bump lashing, as discribed above, I made up a rig w/ two "ribs/frames" and a piece of left over stringer. !/2" Meranti ply "ribs/frames" and 3/4 X 5/8 stringer. a 5/64" hole was a tight for the laceing needle and three passes of 80# test braided kite line, so went to a 3/32" hole drilled vertically in the stringer at each rib/frame location. Example in front is supposed to be a stringer and rib w/ a No-Bump lashing, while example in back is a stringer and frame w/ lashing hole also in frame. W/ a lot more practice I'll likely use this type of lashing in those high wear areas on future SoF rowboats. Please make constructive comments if my attempts are not what's described above.

Steve C.
blindeyeboats

http://i1357.photobucket.com/albums/q760/stevec1940/Boats-misc/IMG_7824_zpsd136378b.jpg


BTW,my first posted pic, only took me a few months to get to here.

James McMullen
02-27-2014, 09:19 PM
I don't really think "no-bump" lashings are worth the hassle, honestly. Incredibly slower than the standard stringer/frame lashing. And why are you scraping your ultralight boat up on the rocks, anyways?

asloth
02-27-2014, 10:59 PM
I don't really think "no-bump" lashings are worth the hassle, honestly. Incredibly slower than the standard stringer/frame lashing. And why are you scraping your ultralight boat up on the rocks, anyways?
Might not be as slow as now w/ a bit of practice and if used I'd place them in low areas that I've seen wear in other SoF rowboats. No dragging over rocks for me yet, but do drag over dock bumpers, and sand beaches now and then.

I'm very interested in how your stretched Whitehall works out for you. Even at Dave's designed length it's a great SoF rowboat.

James McMullen
02-27-2014, 11:10 PM
I'm very interested to find that out too, and we'll have the luxury of having the standard length boat alongside to do a direct side-by-side comparison.

Hoping the the weather cooperates, and if it does, I might well have her skinned and coated by the end of this weekend. Unfortunately, there is a chance of snow which might put the kibosh on that, but we'll see. I'm certainly happy with the frame so far, though.

Ben Fuller
02-28-2014, 07:18 AM
I don't really think "no-bump" lashings are worth the hassle, honestly. Incredibly slower than the standard stringer/frame lashing. And why are you scraping your ultralight boat up on the rocks, anyways?

All I can say is that todays Greenlanders have converted to this lashing method. Maybe the easy availabilty of seine twine. I know that handling line in six foot lengths is easier than 20 plus lenghts.

Ben Fuller
02-28-2014, 07:24 AM
Following directions/instructions for the No-Bump lashing, as discribed above, I made up a rig w/ two "ribs/frames" and a piece of left over stringer. !/2" Meranti ply "ribs/frames" and 3/4 X 5/8 stringer. a 5/64" hole was a tight for the laceing needle and three passes of 80# test braided kite line, so went to a 3/32" hole drilled vertically in the stringer at each rib/frame location. Example in front is supposed to be a stringer and rib w/ a No-Bump lashing, while example in back is a stringer and frame w/ lashing hole also in frame. W/ a lot more practice I'll likely use this type of lashing in those high wear areas on future SoF rowboats. Please make constructive comments if my attempts are not what's described above.

Steve C.
blindeyeboats

http://i1357.photobucket.com/albums/q760/stevec1940/Boats-misc/IMG_7824_zpsdff6fee0.jpg

BTW,my first posted pic, only took me a few months to get to here.

Pretty much have it. Kayak ribs are on the flat of course. The hole in the stringer is lower, about on the midpoint and is large enough to get at least 3 passes of waxed seine twine through it. You don't need to use a needle when you are using the waxed seine twine. It has enough stretch in it so it sets up real tight.

Osbert
02-28-2014, 07:31 AM
I think I have access to good quality boat skin larch that I can use for stringers and gunwales of my proposed LFH17.

I'm wondering about how best to treat the timber, or whether it's necessary. One wall of the extension of our house is larch boards, untreated, and standing up well after 15 years, weathering to silvery grey.

The boat will be rowed, hopefully regularly, on salt water, and stored outside upside down on trestles. I'm in Scotland, so a variable climate, but hot and humid is one thing we don't get.

I'm keen to keep construction, and subsequent maintenance, as simple and speedy as possible, consistent with a reasonable looking boat.

Given our larch wall is doing well, I'm wondering whether untreated stringers and gunwales for the boat are plausible? Alternatives?

Osbert
02-28-2014, 08:46 AM
I've just discovered this site with some interesting - to my mind - approaches to SOF, including a couple of rowing boats, though not much detail on them:
http://www.berkshireboatbuildingschool.org/

Anyone know any more?

Canoez
02-28-2014, 10:14 AM
I've just discovered this site with some interesting - to my mind - approaches to SOF, including a couple of rowing boats, though not much detail on them:
http://www.berkshireboatbuildingschool.org/

Anyone know any more?

Hillary Russell is well known for his canoes and use of "found" natural materials - i.e. willow - in the construction of his boats. I'd say they're more "traditional" SOF builds in that they eschew the use of plywood in terms of solid timber. I've not seen the new rowboat in person, but would think it to be a well thought out boat after seeing his canoe designs.

Kudzu
02-28-2014, 01:29 PM
LTNS, Jeff - what's have you been up to?

Working on a line of custom made float bags right now. Trying to geared up for spring rush!

asloth
02-28-2014, 04:40 PM
Pretty much have it. Kayak ribs are on the flat of course. The hole in the stringer is lower, about on the midpoint and is large enough to get at least 3 passes of waxed seine twine through it. You don't need to use a needle when you are using the waxed seine twine. It has enough stretch in it so it sets up real tight.

Ben, thanks for the confirmation of the No-Bump lashing trial. Reading thru "Building the Greenland Kayak" Cunningham has a section on lashing thru holes (page 87), altho he mentions using notches also to avoid bumps. This is an excellent book on SoF construction even tho its focused on kayaks.

Steve C.

asloth
02-28-2014, 04:57 PM
I've just discovered this site with some interesting - to my mind - approaches to SOF, including a couple of rowing boats, though not much detail on them:
http://www.berkshireboatbuildingschool.org/

Anyone know any more?

https://www.woodenboat.com/launchings/tandem-canoe

Osbert, This canoe was launched awhile back and I bought Hilary's rowboat plans before Eric Schade had finished the drawings. Unfortunatly rowboat plans don't have any instructions/directions within. His prototype looks great. If I do build it might again use willow for the ribs.
****
Regarding a finish for SoF frame. I've been using a boat soup on all my SoF rowboats for years. One part Stockholm Pine Tar mixed w/ one part organic linseed oil, applied very hot to warm/hot wood. Excess wiped clean w/ rags after 1/2 hour. Miss on the wiping excess and you'll have a sticky mess. I apply to INSIDE of frame, as skin contacts the outer surfaces. Lasts for years in low exposure areas and easily recoated in areas that wear thin.

I store all of my SoF rowboats outside inverted on supports. With a loose fitting tarp on a ridge pole for UV protection. With a holed container w/ moth balls to keep the critters away. All has worked fine for many years. Hope this answers your questions above.
Steve C.
blindeyeboats

Osbert
03-02-2014, 06:13 AM
Not specifically a SOF issue, but applies here especially because of the risk of hogging:

I see recommendations to steam and bend the gunwales to create the sheer. But my timber will be shorter than the gunwales. Should I scarf, then steam? Will the epoxy stand up to steaming? Or do I need to steam first, then scarf which would, imagine, be tricky, especially maintaining a smooth curve.

Osbert
03-02-2014, 06:27 AM
SOF with hemp skin:
http://www.flaxland.co.uk/fabric%20boats.html

James McMullen
03-03-2014, 10:05 PM
Well, I decided I wasn't actually done with my stretched Whitehall frame after all. The spacing between stations was nagging at me as it seemed a little bit excessive, and since I already had the steam box hot to make a couple of kayak coamings, I decided to add three frames in between, to stiffen her up a bit more.

http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2870/12919191784_06af244fab_c.jpg

http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2808/12919188414_97ae21a2df_c.jpg

asloth
03-04-2014, 07:15 PM
James, Brilliant - adding oak/ash ribs between the frames to carry the stringers. Opens up a whole new world of SoF construction. Are you lashing the ribs to stringers also? And I've been wanting to ask your woods for stringers, wales, and thwarts?

Steve C.
blindeyeboats

James McMullen
03-04-2014, 11:56 PM
Thanks, Steve, though I can't exactly claim I invented the idea or anything. In fact, all 8 of the other SOF boats I've build used bent ribs; this is the first time I've ever built using the sawn plywood frames of the Gentry/Yost method. . .and apparently I just couldn't help myself. Actually, if I had any criticisms of Gentry's Shenandoah Whitehall design so far, it's that it's just too darn simple and easy if what you are after is a challenging woodworking project rather than just a nice boat, very quickly, for cheap. I keep looking for ways to complicate it, draw it out, make it last. <sigh> Oh well, I just started a kid-sized miniature Baidarka for my eight-year-old nephew to give me more things to carve, bend and lash together to use up some of my frustrated gratuitous craftsmanship and perhaps the leftover fabric offcuts from skinning the whitehalls as well.

Anyways, here's where she stands as of tonight:

https://scontent-a-sea.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-frc3/t1/10004002_723579191019463_1601199937_n.jpg
https://scontent-b-sea.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-frc3/t1/10006954_723579194352796_283802526_n.jpg
https://scontent-b-sea.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash4/t1/1959774_723579184352797_1307193381_n.jpg

The ribs are white oak, stringers and wales western red cedar, floorboards from a genuine d.fir 2x4, and thwarts from 6mm okoume ply with a cedar frame underneath. All frames and ribs are lashed to the stringers and riveted or clench-nailed to the gunwales.

asloth
03-12-2014, 07:50 PM
Skinning over plywood bottom. On the LFH17 built two years ago, I attached a 1/4" plywood "plank" bottom for both structure and floorboard. That's worked very well as a floorboard and adding structure. When it came time to skin, I just covered the primed ply w/ fabric. Later Geodesic Airolites SoF's had plywood bottoms and the bare frame I'd bought (another project) seemed to have the skin cover the ply. So I went ahead w/ it on the first LFH17. Finish was oil based varnish w/ a bit of white tint. The varnish must have completely penetrated the fabric over the bottom, as there was never any trace of water from oar drips and such getting between the skin and bottom.
HOWEVER on LFH17 #2 using the basically the same frame construction and w/ skin over ply bottom, I used water based varnish w/o any tint. Now there seems to be some water seeping from oar drips and such getting between skin and bottom, but disappears after a few days of drying. I'm still watching and waiting before re-skinning. Note to self, make sure next finishing of skin on ply gets thinned 10% or so, and gets completely "glued" together. Build boats and learn.
Steve Chambers
blindeyeboats

PPOD
03-21-2014, 12:43 PM
Hey Steve,
What about adapting a Hobie pedal drive to the plywood bottom of your LFH 17. Due to severe back pain I can no longer row, but I am able to pedal a Hobie kayak fairly comfortably. The 17 looks like a good candidate for this if I can figure out how to do it. Thanks, PPOD

asloth
03-24-2014, 11:01 AM
Hey Steve,
What about adapting a Hobie pedal drive to the plywood bottom of your LFH 17. Due to severe back pain I can no longer row, but I am able to pedal a Hobie kayak fairly comfortably. The 17 looks like a good candidate for this if I can figure out how to do it. Thanks, PPOD

My thoughts are: adapting to a pedal drive changes focus of propulsion from oars on gunnels to somewhere in the ply bottom. So you'd have to reenforce the bottom to not only carry the torsional loads but make it not leak. Might take some experimenting. I do know the the 1/4" ply bottom - floorboard does flex under my seat box, which might make for difficult sealing of the pedal drive unit.

I recall someone a few years ago adapted a pedal drive to one of Jim Michalak's rowboats. Any knowledge of how that project has held up thru these past few years?
If you decide to build a LFH17 and adapt a pedal drive unit, please keep us informed of any and all progress.

Steve Chambers
blindeyeboats

James McMullen
04-14-2014, 02:56 PM
All right boys, here they are! The weather was so nice on sunday that we decided it was far more important to splash these babies than to fuss with irrelevancies such as actually finishing up the project completely. So here they are, sans rubstrips, screw bungs, or even a trace of varnish. But so what? They were very pleasant to row!

First of all: just try this with a carvel Whitehall. Hah!

https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7216/13840703595_27c8f92b62.jpg

It's really neat just how translucent they turned out. You can totally watch the immersed waterline right through the skin. It's fascinating.

https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7383/13840707895_eec059a520.jpg

And it doesn't hurt to have a pretty place on hand to take your pretty boat to.

https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7074/13840737533_2893289c2f.jpg

https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7048/13840715675_42883a1616.jpg

It really was an awfully nice day. Since the boats were performing so well, we ended up going for a longer shakedown than I had expected, down the channel and past this ferry that was in drydock.

https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5136/13840743363_f65f59f436.jpg

But eventually it was nearing dinnertime, so we returned to the dock. But we couldn't head straight home just yet, not before swapping boats to see how they compared. Honestly, there were no surprises whatsoever in that area. The shorter boat is lighter, quicker to maneuver and accelerate. The long one tracks more strongly and has a bit more initial stability. But they're both great boats. I think the shorter one will be handier in a current, the longer one more efficient in an open crossing--again, nothing but what you'd expect.

https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7447/13841093304_d9bc9bf865.jpg

James McMullen
04-14-2014, 02:56 PM
And you can come see them for yourself, right here at this very dock on May 17, along with all the other small boats coming to the Anacortes Messabout.

https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7101/13840731135_2a3803fdb9.jpg

James McMullen
04-14-2014, 03:08 PM
And here's a video by Yeadon showing me working through a bit of chop from a boat wake. These boats turned out a bit stiffer than I would have expected. There seemed to be very little energy lost from flexing.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z73WBy6kDXY&amp;feature=share&amp;list=UUXF-LbDMoNN_ozIhRfkIQjw

asloth
04-14-2014, 04:22 PM
James and Tim, Thanks for forgoing the finishing touches and going ahead w/ launching + pics. Both look great, as expected and good to hear that the stretched one is holding its own. I know of a few builders who would like a bit more length from the original design of Dave Gentry. Dave is also to be congratulated on this adaptation of a classic working rowboat. Your stretched version just moved up a few places on my to build list. Sorry I can't be at the May mess-about, but will be looking for pics and a rich report.

Steve C.
blindeyeboats

Yeadon
04-14-2014, 04:32 PM
They're fun little boats. That's my report.

asloth
04-15-2014, 09:48 PM
They're fun little boats. That's my report.

Two of the SoF rowboats I've build, the same Dave Gentry Whitehall and a BC Handliner, have ended up w/ plywood, for floorboards and as a base for my seat box. Functional, but not the most pleasant to look at. Would one or both of you, post a coupe of interior pics of these Whitehalls showing floorboards, thwarts, and risers? I just might make some major interior changes to one or both of mine.

Steve C.

emf
04-16-2014, 08:57 AM
First of all: just try this with a carvel Whitehall. Hah!
Do you think they weigh less than glued lap ply?

BBSebens
04-17-2014, 12:50 AM
Do you think they weigh less than glued lap ply?

I'm gonna guess yes.

James McMullen
04-17-2014, 07:38 AM
Asloth, I don't really have a bunch more internal shots than what you see here, but I'll be sure to take some next time next time I get out in her. And I'm still working on optimizing the foot braces and such.

Eric and Ben, yes, they most certainly weigh less than glued lap ply. Even the big one is an easy solo carry. I don't have a working scale available at the moment, but I'm estimating her to be sub 75 lbs from how easily I can pick her up and over my head to load on the car rack.

asloth
04-17-2014, 08:50 AM
Do you think they weigh less than glued lap ply?
The Gentry Whitehall I built a couple years ago, just after Dave was building the prototype, ended up weighing 60# using 1/2" ACX ply for frames, Doug.Fir for all the lumber, and 8 oz. polyester skin. What would a glued lap ply weigh of the same boat?

Steve C.

Thanks James in advance for the interior pics of the new Whitehalls.