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sawcutmill
02-26-2004, 07:49 AM
Yesterday, i came across a log that has stumped me!No pun intended!It has bright yellow heartwood,wide growth rings( 1/2" apart)white sapwood,about an 1", the log is fresh,the bark is similiar to sugar maple but has a reddish hue under the first layer, the diameter is about 20".The wood is turning a very light brown, similiar to butternut but Not,it is light in weight as the chunk i cut is also very strong for its lightness wont snap in half,fairly coarse grained,some small ray flecks like maple,open pores to a degree,like red oak but it is not as brown as Catalpa, so what is this wood that was cut in Rhode Island in the last month? I have thought it might be a ornamental as there is only one log of it.Looking for a good online site to do a species comparison, i have all of the Hoadley books, not in there!

sawcutmill
02-26-2004, 07:49 AM
Yesterday, i came across a log that has stumped me!No pun intended!It has bright yellow heartwood,wide growth rings( 1/2" apart)white sapwood,about an 1", the log is fresh,the bark is similiar to sugar maple but has a reddish hue under the first layer, the diameter is about 20".The wood is turning a very light brown, similiar to butternut but Not,it is light in weight as the chunk i cut is also very strong for its lightness wont snap in half,fairly coarse grained,some small ray flecks like maple,open pores to a degree,like red oak but it is not as brown as Catalpa, so what is this wood that was cut in Rhode Island in the last month? I have thought it might be a ornamental as there is only one log of it.Looking for a good online site to do a species comparison, i have all of the Hoadley books, not in there!

sawcutmill
02-26-2004, 07:49 AM
Yesterday, i came across a log that has stumped me!No pun intended!It has bright yellow heartwood,wide growth rings( 1/2" apart)white sapwood,about an 1", the log is fresh,the bark is similiar to sugar maple but has a reddish hue under the first layer, the diameter is about 20".The wood is turning a very light brown, similiar to butternut but Not,it is light in weight as the chunk i cut is also very strong for its lightness wont snap in half,fairly coarse grained,some small ray flecks like maple,open pores to a degree,like red oak but it is not as brown as Catalpa, so what is this wood that was cut in Rhode Island in the last month? I have thought it might be a ornamental as there is only one log of it.Looking for a good online site to do a species comparison, i have all of the Hoadley books, not in there!

Mrleft8
02-26-2004, 08:39 AM
Mulberry?
If you can... Find a leaf.

Mrleft8
02-26-2004, 08:39 AM
Mulberry?
If you can... Find a leaf.

Mrleft8
02-26-2004, 08:39 AM
Mulberry?
If you can... Find a leaf.

Bob Smalser
02-26-2004, 09:03 AM
Ask Professor Wengert and his sawyers:

http://www.woodweb.com/cgi-bin/forums/sawdry.pl?

Bob Smalser
02-26-2004, 09:03 AM
Ask Professor Wengert and his sawyers:

http://www.woodweb.com/cgi-bin/forums/sawdry.pl?

Bob Smalser
02-26-2004, 09:03 AM
Ask Professor Wengert and his sawyers:

http://www.woodweb.com/cgi-bin/forums/sawdry.pl?

sawcutmill
02-28-2004, 06:53 AM
OK , now that I have tentively ID'd the wood as Mulberry,what can anybody tell me about some of its intrinsic characteristics?

sawcutmill
02-28-2004, 06:53 AM
OK , now that I have tentively ID'd the wood as Mulberry,what can anybody tell me about some of its intrinsic characteristics?

sawcutmill
02-28-2004, 06:53 AM
OK , now that I have tentively ID'd the wood as Mulberry,what can anybody tell me about some of its intrinsic characteristics?

Mrleft8
02-28-2004, 09:03 AM
Silk worms need the leaves to produce silk. I have heard (but can't prove) that Mulberry was imported here from the Orient in an attempt to get our Tent catapillars to produce a silk type substance...
Other than that, It is considered weak but decay resistent. Uses include fence posts, boat building, and small pieces of furniture.

Mrleft8
02-28-2004, 09:03 AM
Silk worms need the leaves to produce silk. I have heard (but can't prove) that Mulberry was imported here from the Orient in an attempt to get our Tent catapillars to produce a silk type substance...
Other than that, It is considered weak but decay resistent. Uses include fence posts, boat building, and small pieces of furniture.

Mrleft8
02-28-2004, 09:03 AM
Silk worms need the leaves to produce silk. I have heard (but can't prove) that Mulberry was imported here from the Orient in an attempt to get our Tent catapillars to produce a silk type substance...
Other than that, It is considered weak but decay resistent. Uses include fence posts, boat building, and small pieces of furniture.

Bob Smalser
02-28-2004, 10:38 AM
Mulberry, Black, Morus nigra

No USDA test data.


Black Mulberry, weighing about 40lb/cf, is native to W. Asia. It has a brilliant yellow color, becoming a golden, rich brown with firm grain. This is an excellent wood for chair work.

[ 02-28-2004, 11:50 AM: Message edited by: Bob Smalser ]

Bob Smalser
02-28-2004, 10:38 AM
Mulberry, Black, Morus nigra

No USDA test data.


Black Mulberry, weighing about 40lb/cf, is native to W. Asia. It has a brilliant yellow color, becoming a golden, rich brown with firm grain. This is an excellent wood for chair work.

[ 02-28-2004, 11:50 AM: Message edited by: Bob Smalser ]

Bob Smalser
02-28-2004, 10:38 AM
Mulberry, Black, Morus nigra

No USDA test data.


Black Mulberry, weighing about 40lb/cf, is native to W. Asia. It has a brilliant yellow color, becoming a golden, rich brown with firm grain. This is an excellent wood for chair work.

[ 02-28-2004, 11:50 AM: Message edited by: Bob Smalser ]

Jamie Hascall
02-29-2004, 01:18 AM
From distant recollections of when I was woodworking in Wisconsin, You might want to check out Hackberry. I remember it being yellow with a white sapwood and slightly open pored. But it's been years so who knows :confused: ...

Jamie

Jamie Hascall
02-29-2004, 01:18 AM
From distant recollections of when I was woodworking in Wisconsin, You might want to check out Hackberry. I remember it being yellow with a white sapwood and slightly open pored. But it's been years so who knows :confused: ...

Jamie

Jamie Hascall
02-29-2004, 01:18 AM
From distant recollections of when I was woodworking in Wisconsin, You might want to check out Hackberry. I remember it being yellow with a white sapwood and slightly open pored. But it's been years so who knows :confused: ...

Jamie

Bruce Hooke
02-29-2004, 10:57 AM
If it is Black Mulberry I have one word of caution -- my copy of A Guide to Useful Woods of the World lists "Black Mulberry" as an alternate name for "Red Mulberry" (Morus rubra). Red Mulberry is native to much of the Eastern US (but not New England), but the wood description and picture do not match the wood you have. Black Mulberry does not appear at all in my copy of The Audubon Society Field Guide to North America Trees. I'm not sure what Bob's source is but since it explicitly identifies Black Mulberry as a unique species with it's own latin name I have to suspect that it is right and my wood book is wrong, surprising as that seems since it is put out by the International Wood Collectors Society (IWCS). The point I'm getting to is that if the IWCS got this wrong then there may well be a fair amount of confusion about this point in other references. So, if you find other references to "Black Mulberry" I would make sure that the source is definitely talking about Black Mulberry as a distinct species.

Bruce Hooke
02-29-2004, 10:57 AM
If it is Black Mulberry I have one word of caution -- my copy of A Guide to Useful Woods of the World lists "Black Mulberry" as an alternate name for "Red Mulberry" (Morus rubra). Red Mulberry is native to much of the Eastern US (but not New England), but the wood description and picture do not match the wood you have. Black Mulberry does not appear at all in my copy of The Audubon Society Field Guide to North America Trees. I'm not sure what Bob's source is but since it explicitly identifies Black Mulberry as a unique species with it's own latin name I have to suspect that it is right and my wood book is wrong, surprising as that seems since it is put out by the International Wood Collectors Society (IWCS). The point I'm getting to is that if the IWCS got this wrong then there may well be a fair amount of confusion about this point in other references. So, if you find other references to "Black Mulberry" I would make sure that the source is definitely talking about Black Mulberry as a distinct species.

Bruce Hooke
02-29-2004, 10:57 AM
If it is Black Mulberry I have one word of caution -- my copy of A Guide to Useful Woods of the World lists "Black Mulberry" as an alternate name for "Red Mulberry" (Morus rubra). Red Mulberry is native to much of the Eastern US (but not New England), but the wood description and picture do not match the wood you have. Black Mulberry does not appear at all in my copy of The Audubon Society Field Guide to North America Trees. I'm not sure what Bob's source is but since it explicitly identifies Black Mulberry as a unique species with it's own latin name I have to suspect that it is right and my wood book is wrong, surprising as that seems since it is put out by the International Wood Collectors Society (IWCS). The point I'm getting to is that if the IWCS got this wrong then there may well be a fair amount of confusion about this point in other references. So, if you find other references to "Black Mulberry" I would make sure that the source is definitely talking about Black Mulberry as a distinct species.