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Paul Pless
01-19-2014, 06:48 AM
Pallada

http://24.media.tumblr.com/392e7ceb7920a0968d4a04732554f9f5/tumblr_mxef9vtsZg1r0rofpo1_1280.jpg

Duncan Gibbs
01-19-2014, 07:05 AM
Amazing picture! :)

Gerarddm
01-19-2014, 12:28 PM
SUCH a great photo.

Dan McCosh
01-19-2014, 01:48 PM
So where was the photographer standing?

skuthorp
01-19-2014, 02:39 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y6n6lC5RcBI

Paul Pless
01-19-2014, 03:41 PM
Padua

http://24.media.tumblr.com/903b70d3cd3776660f7dc7b2f76ba0d9/tumblr_mzi8evJWeW1tpn192o1_1280.jpg

Ian McColgin
01-19-2014, 03:49 PM
Capt. Villars had some remarks about the ways in which these were better vessels than their British counterparts.

Paul Pless
01-19-2014, 03:51 PM
Capt. Villars had some remarks about the ways in which these were better vessels than their British counterparts.the cat walks above deck level for one thing

Andrew Craig-Bennett
01-19-2014, 04:05 PM
They were fitted with Jarvis brace winches; a British invention which British shipowners did not adopt due to the expense.

http://www.bruzelius.info/Nautica/Rigging/Jarvis(patent).html

https://encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTH1pil2bjV0ji1Rt11et8K6yUR0Pegz CFTOmRDcloAxgdbzvBilQ

Andrew Craig-Bennett
01-19-2014, 04:09 PM
Probably the best sailing ship ever built:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/c9/Preussen_-_StateLibQld_70_73320.jpg/800px-Preussen_-_StateLibQld_70_73320.jpg

John Meachen
01-19-2014, 05:40 PM
I have been on board this one a time or two-sadly not under sail.It surprised me to see how deep the holds were.

http://i578.photobucket.com/albums/ss226/John_Meachen/Coastal%20scenes/SAM_0583.jpg

Paul Pless
01-19-2014, 05:57 PM
Probably the best sailing ship ever built:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/c9/Preussen_-_StateLibQld_70_73320.jpg/800px-Preussen_-_StateLibQld_70_73320.jpg

a 426 nm 24hour run, and several 390 plus nm 24 hour runs under her belt; that's unequaled by anything under sail with her capacity for cargo

she could tack at 16 knots!

sadly run down by a british steamer who under estimated her speed under sail

Andrew Craig-Bennett
01-19-2014, 06:06 PM
Did you know that the owners of the Flying P Line, F. Laeisz, are very much still in the shipowning business today? And that they have been in business since 1824?

http://www.laeisz.de/startseite/

Paul Pless
01-19-2014, 06:08 PM
ya iii

purri
01-19-2014, 07:46 PM
Slightly OT; I saw the Pamir a few times. Impressive.

Gerarddm
01-19-2014, 07:49 PM
Is #12 ​Preussen?

Andrew Craig-Bennett
01-20-2014, 01:42 AM
Is #12 ​Preussen?

Yes.

Whilst she was a very successful ship, it is sobering to reflect that this long haul bulk carrier of 1900 carried a crew of 45, and could load a cargo of 8,100 metric tons. She had two steam donkey engines and of course the Jarvis winches., so she was as "labour saving" as was possible at the time.

Today we are getting used to ore carriers loading 400,000 tons.

The last Flying P Line ship in active service is the Kruzenshtern, built in 1926 as the Padua; an amazingly long innings.

Paul Pless
02-03-2014, 06:10 AM
Padua

http://24.media.tumblr.com/17b369fbdceb6d524860191bb284b815/tumblr_mzi8dcnWXm1tpn192o1_1280.jpg

Andrew Craig-Bennett
02-03-2014, 06:44 AM
and again, in 2005:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/c9/Kruzenshtern_at_Sail_Bremerhaven_%281%29.jpg/800px-Kruzenshtern_at_Sail_Bremerhaven_%281%29.jpg

jonboy
02-03-2014, 06:58 AM
The Pamir came to an unfortunate end with high loss of life due to an inexperienced captain about to retire, given the command on his swansong voyage. ignoring the weather, not using the radio, storing barley loose in the holds, as it swims about unlike other grains, loading the keel ballast tanks with grain too, recipe for disaster NW of the Ašores.

The most exclusive club in the world closed a few years ago with the death of the last member.... to be a member you had to have commanded a sailing cargo ship around the Horn. I think he was a P man. The P's werent even fitted with engines till the early half of 20th C . There's a German video and book I borrowed recently, but due to 'lost in translation' (it wasn't, basically, and my German is about zero) I might have got it a bit wrong... I am trying to source it in English....If I find it or anyone else knows, it will show up here i'm sure

Andrew Craig-Bennett
02-03-2014, 07:20 AM
Accurate summary. I knew men in Hamburg in the 70's who had been cadets on Passat and Pamir.

Paul Pless
04-08-2014, 07:14 AM
Preussen

http://31.media.tumblr.com/a58376fef2336da7b961cf1d17b7f4a5/tumblr_n3nun25W9t1twp71po1_1280.jpg

varadero
04-08-2014, 07:26 AM
Ray Atkins, one time mate on Marques and Inca, also on the Rose, was a trainee on Pamir. I learned a lot from him in the early 80s

Gerarddm
04-08-2014, 09:22 AM
Was very fortunate to cross Kruzenshtern at sea under all sail during the 1976 Newport-Bermuda Race. She was going downhill to Newport; we were on a Swan 48 going uphill to Bermuda. Passed her about a mile to starboard. Most impressive, and big.