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Flinders
01-18-2014, 04:33 PM
Hi Folks

A boat that is for sale.

2 Questions.
Can any body advise how suitable Meranti would be for clinker planking (boat lives on a trailer).
i am not interested in how nice it would look varnished thats obvious.

Secondly because it lives on a trailer it takes water. Do you just pump it until it takes up or seal the laps on the outside with a bead of coloured sikaflex and then pump it until it takes up.
It would be a shame to glass over it. Dont want to flood the motor.


Cheers Flinders

keith66
01-18-2014, 05:25 PM
Meranti varies hugely, i have two great 18ft planks of it that are a deep dark red colour & hard as iron plus nearly as heavy, other stuff called the same is lighter & softer. Sometimes called Phillipine mahogany it is rather variable!

David G
01-18-2014, 06:19 PM
As mentioned, it varies. But - overall - the notion of meranti for such planking wouldn't disturb me. A traditional shiplap construction for a trailer boat has, as you've seen, issues. Unfortunately, I'm not aware of any elegant, foolproof solution. Anything you do to solve the takeup problem... is too likely to cause other problems. I'd say decide you can live with it... or decide you can't.

epoxyboy
01-18-2014, 07:52 PM
As far as I know, there are a number of species out of SE Asia that get called Meranti - a bit like pine. I haven't seen any mahogany-like meranti plywood for about seven years now, it is all some much lighter coloured wood, and quite a lot softer. I think you'd need to know exactly which sub-species you were dealing with.

Pete

Eric Hvalsoe
01-18-2014, 11:05 PM
If you are suggesting that any clinker boat that lives on a trailer takes water, it just ain't so. VG cedar planking can stay tight and dry as a drum.

But that is not what you are looking at. Like David, I don't think meranti in an of itself, is a disqualifier. But we don't know much else. As somebody else said, a lot of lumber falls under that category. Is it dense, is it light. Is it flat sawn, is it quarter sawn, which tells you something about dimensional stability and how likely it will be to open up.

I took leap and assumed you are talking about solid lumber plank . . .

Flinders
01-20-2014, 04:02 PM
Hi Eric
Whats the VG stand for in VG cedar planking

David G
01-20-2014, 04:13 PM
VG stands for vertical grain. This is the most dimensionally stable cut of wood. For planking... that's a good thing. Though... with a species like cedar that is a bit prone to splitting, I'm more inclined to think rift sawn (slightly angled when compared to vg)... just to ameliorate the splitting potential - though at the loss of a bit of stability.

But Eric is right... such questions are more complex than, "Is meranti ok as planking?"

phiil
01-20-2014, 06:57 PM
And all this time I thought that VG stood for Vertical Grain....

P.L.Lenihan
01-20-2014, 07:08 PM
And all this time I thought that VG stood for Vertical Grain....

In most of the world, it still does.....I suspect Sir David G. had a burp coming up at the very instant he typed "grade",that is all.

David G
01-20-2014, 08:00 PM
In most of the world, it still does.....I suspect Sir David G. had a burp coming up at the very instant he typed "grade",that is all.

More like a mental hiccup. Sometimes my fingers have no mind of their own... and take over my my upstairs No Mind. Though, in my defense, in the industry, this useage (though not strictly correct) is common.

Flinders
02-16-2014, 02:47 AM
Thanks folks