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View Full Version : Syed, Question on SW Asia Agriculture.



BrianW
01-18-2014, 09:28 AM
Hello Syed. I'm hoping you might be able to tell me (us) something about what's being grown here, and why they seem to be placing rocks on the plants...

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v136/BrianW/Afghanistan%202014/rockplants3_zpsd6f4ecc9.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v136/BrianW/Afghanistan%202014/rockplants4_zps9913b011.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v136/BrianW/Afghanistan%202014/rockplants2_zpsff94e2f8.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v136/BrianW/Afghanistan%202014/rockplants_zpsd0e3426d.jpg

I don't recall seeing this technique anywhere except around the Kabul International Airport. There are several different fields of them.

Thank you for any information you may be able to share.

slug
01-18-2014, 09:50 AM
Dont know the area. Stone piles or walls are normally used to prevent precocious topsoil from blowing away and to preserve soil moisture.

Syed
01-18-2014, 10:47 AM
I am not sure, Brian but my guess is that those might be strawberry fields.
I live in a place (the province of Punjab) where most of the land is very flat and a strawberry field here looks like;
http://photos.thenews.com.pk/tasveer_images/2013-4-15/large/2_201304150858470117.jpg

katey
01-18-2014, 12:03 PM
Rocks can be used as moisture traps. They cool off during the night, and then water condenses on them first thing in the morning and runs down into the plant.

Full Tilt
01-18-2014, 02:42 PM
That sounds logical Katey.

Could they be mulberry plants Syed?

Monkey Butler
01-18-2014, 06:42 PM
They're not rocks, they are genetically modified magic beans that Halliburton secretly sells to the locals over there.

katey
01-18-2014, 06:47 PM
Mulberries grow on trees. At least the ones I know about do. Maybe they can be managed as bushes, but they are definitely woody.

PeterSibley
01-18-2014, 07:20 PM
Mulberries grow on trees. At least the ones I know about do. Maybe they can be managed as bushes, but they are definitely woody.

There is a small silk industry revival in Afghanistan and mulberry trees are normally pruned small and low to harvest leaves, much as it was done in China. Whether those trees are mulberrys though is really hard to tell.

http://www.theguardian.com/global-development/gallery/2011/oct/21/afghanistan-silk-industry-revival-in-pictures#/?picture=379958687&index=7

Interesting Brian !

purri
01-18-2014, 09:29 PM
^ Cough...

Syed
01-19-2014, 03:21 AM
That sounds logical Katey.

Could they be mulberry plants Syed?
I don't think those were mulberry plants. There are mulberry trees in this part of the world.

BrianW
01-19-2014, 07:30 AM
Well, I appreciate the efforts folks. We may simply be stumped.

I can only hope to get some more pictures this Spring and Summer. The two first shots are from a couple months back, when they were still somewhat green. The last two just were taken recently.

Paul Pless
01-19-2014, 07:35 AM
Rocks can be used as moisture traps. They cool off during the night, and then water condenses on them first thing in the morning and runs down into the plant.hmmm. . . . afghani fremen?

BrianW
01-19-2014, 08:06 AM
Rocks can be used as moisture traps. They cool off during the night, and then water condenses on them first thing in the morning and runs down into the plant.


hmmm. . . . afghani fremen?

Afghanistan is not as arid as Arrakis. ;)

The people here are masters of irrigation, water canals, and wells. The Russians helped a bit too, with some dam projects and concrete water canals in the '60's and 70's.