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View Full Version : Planer marks to perfect finish- what's your sanding method?



JMAC
01-17-2014, 06:20 PM
I've been doing pretty much the same thing for years and am sure I'm not getting the very best results. What tools, methods, papers do you use that you wish to talk up? Pictures of your projects are welcome...

Peerie Maa
01-17-2014, 06:24 PM
I've been doing pretty much the same thing for years and am sure I'm not getting the very best results. What tools, methods, papers do you use that you wish to talk up? Pictures of your projects are welcome...

If you are talking thicknesser, rather than hand held power plane, I hear that passing the timber through two or three times at the same thickness setting takes off the crests.

P.I. Stazzer-Newt
01-17-2014, 06:26 PM
Card scraper.

PeterSibley
01-17-2014, 06:30 PM
Scraper or if I'm rushed and slack my 7" soft pad sander, I'm getting good with that thing !

Donn
01-17-2014, 06:33 PM
ROS with Mirka Abranet disks. If I need to go finer than 600x, Micro-Mesh disks.

David G
01-17-2014, 06:35 PM
Planer. Belt Sander - usually #80 to start, then #100. Then random orbit sander - starting with the same grit you finished your belt sanding with, and taking it at far as you feel necessary.

If you don't have a belt sander, then a bit of scraping, then the R.O. sander. Or... just scraping... which is more tedious, but - for the right piece - can sometimes be rewarding. It can highlight any chatoyance that exists.

Jim Mahan
01-17-2014, 06:37 PM
Ditto cabinet scraper. If you do it right with a kept sharp steel, you make super thin shavings, not dust, you likely won't need to sand at all.
No grit is good grit.

David G
01-17-2014, 11:20 PM
In the interests of the client's nickle, I only use a scraper when the advantages, as mentioned above, outweigh the disadvantages. If you're a hobbyist with purist leanings... the cabinet scraper - either hand-held, or as a scraper plane - is really nice. But it's not fast if you have a lot of territory to cover. It's also only useful on flat surfaces. And... marquetry (which is what the OP does) can be fragile. That's probably why he asked about sanding techniques.

john welsford
01-18-2014, 02:49 AM
I've been doing pretty much the same thing for years and am sure I'm not getting the very best results. What tools, methods, papers do you use that you wish to talk up? Pictures of your projects are welcome...

I am an Abranet convert, start with a random orbital sander with 120 grit, then 180, maybe 220, then if I want a decent finish I use a cabinet scraper.

John Welsford

PeterSibley
01-18-2014, 05:24 AM
I am an Abranet convert, start with a random orbital sander with 120 grit, then 180, maybe 220, then if I want a decent finish I use a cabinet scraper.

John Welsford

Seconded.

P.I. Stazzer-Newt
01-18-2014, 05:29 AM
In the interests of the client's nickle, I only use a scraper when the advantages, as mentioned above, outweigh the disadvantages. If you're a hobbyist with purist leanings... the cabinet scraper - either hand-held, or as a scraper plane - is really nice. But it's not fast if you have a lot of territory to cover. It's also only useful on flat surfaces. And... marquetry (which is what the OP does) can be fragile. That's probably why he asked about sanding techniques.

Seek ye a violin maker. - Scrapers can be used to good effect on all sorts of ungodly things.

JMAC
01-18-2014, 06:38 AM
What a strong response from the international crowd! I use a scraper when I feel that it is the right tool. For me it would not be the go-to tool in removing planer ridges. It's not especially useful in very curvy work or on edges that have been molded. Here's my usual method- on flat surfaces I'll use my Bosch 3x21 belt sander with a 100 grit belt, the object being to just get rid of the planer marks. After this leveling, it's all about removing the previous grit's scratches. More later...

slug
01-18-2014, 06:47 AM
Beltsander guides work. Worthwhile if you do a lot of flat surfaces.


http://s12.postimg.org/i7iidmp59/image.jpg (http://postimage.org/)
imag (http://postimage.org/index.php?lang=spanish)

JMAC
01-18-2014, 07:01 AM
I had the world's very best belt sander- the AEG 3x21. They were so good that of course they stopped making them and AEG sold themselves off to Milwaukee who sold the design to Chicago Pnuematic who sold the sanders briefly. I completely used up 2 of them while they were available. They came with a sanding frame, but I never found the need as they were so well balanced. My Bosch is also well balanced and doesn't dig in unless I step on the cord at a bad time...

Mrleft8
01-18-2014, 08:36 AM
On solid wood or sawn veneers, a hand plane and a card scraper if the grain is squirrely. On store bought veneers a card scraper, usually followed by 220 and then 320 grit paper. I use the white Norton paper..... I think it's called "500" or something like that....

Paul Pless
01-18-2014, 10:04 AM
Planer. Belt Sander - usually #80 to start, then #100. belt sander? dude you must be more of a woodworking badass then i previously thought. . .

Tom Wilkinson
01-18-2014, 10:23 AM
Rarely do I sand past 150 or 220 as the scratches left cannot be seen unaided anyway. Finish coats get sanded to 400 or better. For removal of planer marks and veneer tape when doing marquetry its a often belt sander with 100 grit or so and a light touch. Planer runs a helical cutterhead and that does seem to reduce sanding time quite a bit.

JMAC
01-18-2014, 10:30 AM
I bought a Porter-Cable 5" random orbital disc sander, based on a Fine Woodworking review. That was a long time ago. I'm interested in getting a swirl-scratch free finish. I usually hand sand with 220 or 320 as a last step, but even that can be problematic around joints and doesn't always get the swirls out.

slug
01-18-2014, 10:34 AM
I bought a Porter-Cable 5" random orbital disc sander, based on a Fine Woodworking review. That was a long time ago. I'm interested in getting a swirl-scratch free finish. I usually hand sand with 220 or 320 as a last step, but even that can be problematic around joints and doesn't always get the swirls out.


Random orbital sanders are rated by orbit diameter. Small orbit, fine paper and swirls are much less visable..

I dont know the porter cable.

David G
01-18-2014, 11:35 AM
Seek ye a violin maker. - Scrapers can be used to good effect on all sorts of ungodly things.

Yes, I understand. I've got gooseneck scrapers, and various manufactured shapes of scrapers, and a number of profiles I've created myself. But not to be used to good effect by the uninitiated... and certainly not on large areas... unless you've got all year.

David G
01-18-2014, 11:38 AM
Beltsander guides work. Worthwhile if you do a lot of flat surfaces.


http://s12.postimg.org/i7iidmp59/image.jpg (http://postimage.org/)
imag (http://postimage.org/index.php?lang=spanish)

If one doesn't use a belt-sander a lot, these make really good training wheels! They're often a little spendy, but I do like them.

David G
01-18-2014, 11:45 AM
belt sander? dude you must be more of a woodworking badass then i previously thought. . .

Belt sanders are NOT tools of mass destruction... unless you want them to be (or are in the hands of a heedless nooby). Same goes for grinders with a coarse flap-wheel. They can destroy... or finesse. They're just tools. Sometimes the right tools for the job. Sometimes not. A lot depends on which tools you've gotten comfortable with. I've logged a lot of belt sander hours, and can flatten a table-top to the nth degree (though these days, I usually cheat, and run it thru the wide-belt sander), or sculpt a rolling bevel.

David G
01-18-2014, 11:46 AM
Rarely do I sand past 150 or 220 as the scratches left cannot be seen unaided anyway. Finish coats get sanded to 400 or better. For removal of planer marks and veneer tape when doing marquetry its a often belt sander with 100 grit or so and a light touch. Planer runs a helical cutterhead and that does seem to reduce sanding time quite a bit.

Sanding to finer grits (though I seldom do it) doesn't take all that long, and WILL decrease the difference in how a grain pops between a sanded surface and a scraped surface.

David G
01-18-2014, 11:48 AM
I bought a Porter-Cable 5" random orbital disc sander, based on a Fine Woodworking review. That was a long time ago. I'm interested in getting a swirl-scratch free finish. I usually hand sand with 220 or 320 as a last step, but even that can be problematic around joints and doesn't always get the swirls out.

I have Bosches... and am quite happy with them. I have the use of a Festool Rotex... and would certainly recommend them... if your checkbook can handle the hit.

Keith Wilson
01-18-2014, 04:01 PM
The first thing is that I admitted is that there's no such thing as a perfect finish - or if there is, I'm not the one that's going to do it. Good enough is perfect. Besides, I hate sanding, and I mostly work with white oak, which is porous enough that sanding beyond 150 or so is fruitless. My Porter-Cable 5" RO sander is good enough. I like that belt sander frame though; maybe I'll look into that. Might be quicker.

Rich Jones
01-18-2014, 04:12 PM
I use all of the above. And why is this thread down here in the Bilge? Although, sadly, you'll get more responses down here...

pcford
01-18-2014, 04:22 PM
Hand sand. Soft block followed by hard block.

pcford
01-18-2014, 04:23 PM
Hand sand. Soft block followed by hard block. Stay away from machines as much as possible except for gross stuff.

David G
01-18-2014, 06:32 PM
Once again... we've illustrated the axiom that I've tried to instill into the various employees over the years -- There are plenty of ways to do it wrong, but there are also a lot of ways to do it right. Get good with one approach, then expand your repertoire, as you discover the situational drawbacks for your initial choice.

Canoeyawl
01-18-2014, 06:54 PM
I avoid sanding as much as I can and mostly use edged tools - But these work pretty well.

Straightline sander

http://www.ntxtools.com/Merchant/graphics/00000001/ing-ir315.gif

I think Hutchins makes the best sanding tools
https://www.pbepro.com/common/Hutchins/images_nwm/hi/8620H.jpg

slug
01-19-2014, 02:46 AM
The problem with scrapers is grain orientation.

Its the teak deck gangs who are experts at sanding flat surfaces. Long handle pull Scrapers, belt sanders and rotary soft pad grinders.

i rarely see air files...they consume too much air and cost a fortune to run