PDA

View Full Version : Healthcare premiiums will go up



Ted Hoppe
01-15-2014, 06:18 PM
Just under a quarter of Obamacare sign-ups so far have been in the critical 18-to-35-year-old age range, the Obama administration revealed Monday, the first time officials have given demographic data about health plan enrollees. The administration had set a goal of around 38 percent to 40 percent of the enrollees in that age bracket by the time the sign-up season ends March 31. There is a lot of hope from the adminstration but little teeth on this quite dependant subject.

Since there is no reason for the younger demographic to sign up because the peniality is far cheaper than out of pocket expenses...why would the young sign up (they don't need the coverage immedately, they are making less based on inflation than thier parents, have little employer based healthcare provided and businesses don't care if there employees have coverage)? Count on healthcare premiums to go up as sicker 45 to 65 year olds begin to burden the system beyond what the insurers are willing to forgo as a quite profitable venture. Include the new wave of imigration reforms coming along, those responsable citizens and holders of green cards who have to self finance healthcare are going to pay more.

RodB
01-15-2014, 06:41 PM
http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2014/01/14/obamacare-bailout-train-gains-steam/


ObamaCare bailout train gains steam
...The shorthand: President Obama’s signature entitlement program needs 40 percent of its enrollees to be paying customers in the prime 18-34 age range. Otherwise, the risk pool will be too shallow and insurers will have to jack up rates even more on everyone else in order to stay solvent. The first numbers show only 25 percent of enrollees are in the most desirable demographic. The administration has until the end of March to herd people into the program, but if older, sicker and more costly customers continue to so heavily outnumber the young, “risk corridors” (a.k.a. bailouts) built into the law are sure to see some traffic.

Rubio ready - Whatever anyone tells you, the next big ObamaCare battlefield will be over these bailouts. Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., got there first and is holding the high ground with his bill to block the funds from flowing. But no matter how much American’s dislike the idea of an insurance bailout, they would like even less the idea of a “death spiral” resulting in escalating premiums for all, including those with employer-based insurance. The end of the spiral comes when the whole marketplace goes kablooey and everybody has to go sign up for Medicaid. Team Obama would much rather be the one playing populist cards right now, but their go-to move of scourging big insurance won’t work when the administration is trying to keep the industry placated and solvent in order to avoid an even bigger election-year uproar....




RodB

Ted Hoppe
01-15-2014, 06:51 PM
Rubio should know more than anyone. Florida is a great example of population opting out of important social programs because they are too expensive. A state predicated on a large majority working on the barest of minimum wages and living solely on social security are fine indicators. The election uproar may go ther other way - causing the working poor to push for even greater goverment subsidized universal healthcare.

From Health News Florida

The number of Medicaid enrollees in Florida as of the end of December was 2.89 million up a bit from 2.85 million last summer. The number of Medicaid enrollees has been growing in part because of the still-troubled economy, but also because the health law's Jan. 1 requirement to have health insurance has brought many people in who had qualified for Medicaid before but not signed up, for whatever reason.

John Smith
01-15-2014, 06:56 PM
What would you two LIKE to see happen?

Also, would you like to develop information on the rate of increase for health insurance premiums over the last decade, so you can compare it to the coming decade?

I don't think anyone believe anyone has predicted premiums will come down; only they won't go up as quickly as they had been.

Isn't judging at this point in time like calling a horse race when the horse have only gotten to the first bend?

Ted Hoppe
01-15-2014, 07:07 PM
Isn't judging at this point in time like calling a horse race when the horse have only gotten to the first bend?

There is a difference between a horse race and a pig race. More squeel that meat.

http://www.thorninpaw.com/pigs.jpg

Shang
01-15-2014, 07:11 PM
It seems as if the Single-Payer option would solve this problem.
But of course the Right-wingers don't want the problem solved.

Keith Wilson
01-15-2014, 07:27 PM
Sigh . . . I just knew that 'bailout' BS would come up pretty soon from one of our Fox Newsboys. Marco Rubio, bless his heart, has been flogging this one, and the wretched wanker is trying to turn it into another attempt to sabotage the ACA.

It goes like this.

- Predicting the future is difficult.
- It takes a while to start up a major program, to educate people, and get people used to the changes.
- Those who wrote the law knew that the number of low-risk people signing up in the early days might be low, and was certainly unpredictable They have less incentive, the penalties are low in the beginning, they historically have tended to do things at the last minute, and the startup problems with the website didn't help.
- It was anticipated that it would take a couple of years for the risk profile of those getting insurance through the program to stabilize.
- Therefore, a feature was built into the law to subsidize insurance temporarily to get the program through the startup period if a higher percentage of old and sick people signed up initially. That's how it's supposed to work; it makes a great deal of sense.
- You have a problem with that?


Healthcare premiums will go up . . . Dog will bite man! Politicians will stretch the truth! Fraternity boys will get drunk! The sun will rise in the east!

Gerarddm
01-15-2014, 07:38 PM
That percentage of younger people enrollment is a touch higher than Romneycare in Massachusetts at the same point in time.

Chill.

Ted Hoppe
01-15-2014, 08:13 PM
Chill.

Since the election some folks have become more mellow there in Washington State....:rolleyes:

It is true Massachusetts has faced some of these challenges. Young, healthy people came into the market and bought less generous (hence, cheaper) plans than the sicker individuals who had been in that guaranteed market. In Massachusetts, the sick were buying good products. With the current health care law and the individual mandates that were historically tracked in Massachusetts, young people are buying down, not buying up. The typical youthful health insurance market in the country today has people buying really crappy entry level bronze products if at all.

If you too were in that age segment, it simply works out better to take the federal penality. Those folks not be covered for catastrophic healthcare care - all the better for the individual under treatment - they will be moved from emergency room to mediCal/medicare. Can't get blood from a (turnup - one who turns up wanting food, services and comfort) turnip.

pkrone
01-15-2014, 08:17 PM
turnip

Ted Hoppe
01-15-2014, 08:19 PM
turnip

A Turnup - a youth not paying insurance expecting quality medical care at emergency room and long term treatment.BY:D

Keith Wilson
01-15-2014, 08:25 PM
FWIW, the penalty increases over time (source (https://www.healthcare.gov/what-if-someone-doesnt-have-health-coverage-in-2014/)):


The penalty in 2014 is calculated one of 2 ways. You’ll pay whichever of these amounts is higher:

1% of your yearly household income. The maximum penalty is the national average yearly premium for a bronze plan.

$95 per person for the year ($47.50 per child under 18). The maximum penalty per family using this method is $285.

The fee increases every year. In 2015 it’s 2% of income or $325 per person. In 2016 and later years it’s 2.5% of income or $695 per person. After that it is adjusted for inflation.

Ted Hoppe
01-15-2014, 08:29 PM
FWIW, the penalty increases over time (source (https://www.healthcare.gov/what-if-someone-doesnt-have-health-coverage-in-2014/)):

Does that include the truly invisible population of 11 million plus undocumented workers plus their border crossing families?

Keith Wilson
01-15-2014, 08:31 PM
Obviously not; they're under the radar for a lot of things. That's another issue entirely.

pkrone
01-15-2014, 08:32 PM
A Turnup - a youth not paying insurance expecting quality medical care at emergency room and long term treatment.BY:D

Good one! Taken care of a number of those over the years.

Ted Hoppe
01-15-2014, 08:32 PM
Obviously not; they're under the radar for a lot of things. That's another issue entirely.

not really. They are guest workers here Keith. It is a large part of why emergency room visits got out of control. To ignore this under the current healthcare plan is ludicrous and one of the largest holes we fill in our government insurance package. They are the ones most likely to get hurt on the job and more likely have real families in dire needs they support.

Keith Wilson
01-15-2014, 09:54 PM
Oh, I quite agree, but a more reasonable immigration policy is another issue entirely, albeit with a bit of overlap, and not one likely to get solved in the near future. Anything approaching more compassionate treatment of those here illegally is usually anathema to the nativist right.

John Smith
01-16-2014, 10:46 AM
Ted:

Please explain: are you cheering for the ACA to fail? If so, why?

I would think every American would hope it succeeds.

This American, for the record, has been, and remains, a strong proponent of single payer.