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View Full Version : What's corned beef to you....



jonboy
01-15-2014, 12:45 PM
For me it's a slightly dodgy canned pressed meat from some where S. America.... I love it and it also makes good carp bait.

My ma used to make it into a pie with thin meatstock gravy, Bovril or similar....
Just been looking for other recipes and what seems to appear is what I call pastrami, or maybe salt beef, but real beef whatever..Reuben sandwich for example, what I call pastrami on rye...
So what's the stuff I love in the funny square based truncated cone shaped cans with a metal zipper that will remove your finger tips like that.... recipes too, please

jack grebe
01-15-2014, 12:46 PM
nasty, nasty nasty

Lew Barrett
01-15-2014, 12:51 PM
To me it is a fresh beef brisket seasoned and cured in spices and boiled gently following the seasoning . It is not canned, and it is most definitely the end product of experience mixed with a degree of art. There are plenty of corned beef recipes available, but in the world I grew up in none of them start by opening a can.

Pastrami uses the same basic cut of meat but employs a different curing process and spice mix. It's also generally served leaner
in my experience. They are similar but not identical, pastrami being somewhat more peppery in flavor and less unctuous.

Donn
01-15-2014, 12:56 PM
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/dc/Corned-beef-1.jpg/791px-Corned-beef-1.jpg

slug
01-15-2014, 01:00 PM
On the boat we cant carry meat...only canned

a favorite dish is corned beef hash

http://www.simplyrecipes.com/recipes/corned_beef_hash/

jonboy
01-15-2014, 01:00 PM
looks like someting Saatchi would buy...bet he wouldn't put it in a pie though, what with the ghost of Niggley or whatever she's called leaning over his m/billions

S/V Laura Ellen
01-15-2014, 01:01 PM
To me it is a fresh beef brisket seasoned and cured in spices and boiled gently following the seasoning . It is not canned, and it is most definitely the end product of experience mixed with a degree of art. There are plenty of corned beef recipes available, but in the world I grew up in none of them start by opening a can.

Pastrami uses the same basic cut of meat but employs a different curing process and spice mix. It's also generally served leaner
in my experience. They are similar but not identical, pastrami being somewhat more peppery in flavor and less unctuous.

I'm with Lew on this...

bogdog
01-15-2014, 01:04 PM
For us it's salted beef, now bison, that we usually have during the winter months, boiled with cabbage and root veggies and served with a horseradish white sauce. We used the canned stuff when I was kid on camping trips.

One year decades ago my wife and I were headed home to Wisconsin during a particularly bad blizzard. At one point I said to my wife "wouldn't it be great if when we got home your mom had made boiled beef and cabbage?" We rolled it about four hours later than we would have under better conditions. As soon as I opened the back door I could smell it. One of the very best meals I've ever eaten.

jonboy
01-15-2014, 01:11 PM
..... but in the world I grew up in none of them start by opening a can.


In the world I grew up in most things started by opening a can...
I remember my older sister coming home from Uni in the sixties with spaghetti in about a half a yard long blue paper tube.. we thought is was fireworks, mum thought she was bonkers.

Figment
01-15-2014, 01:15 PM
I'm with lew.

Served hashed, under eggs, with rye toast.

Breakaway
01-15-2014, 01:28 PM
Pickled or cured fresh brisket.Boiled. Fattier, wetter and "looser" in grain than pastrami. Serve with hot mustard, cabbage and 'taters.Horseradish is good too. On rye as a sang-witch for the leftovers. Finally, use fourth day leftovers by chopping and dicing into hash and serving with eggs.

Kevin

BETTY-B
01-15-2014, 01:38 PM
Making homemade corned beef is as easy as any other brine. Just more ingredients than most.

http://i32.photobucket.com/albums/d10/Bridgedeck/Food/Corned%20Beef/DSCF0808_zps4b98d828.jpg (http://s32.photobucket.com/user/Bridgedeck/media/Food/Corned%20Beef/DSCF0808_zps4b98d828.jpg.html)

And it is far superior to anything pre-brined in the grocery store. Worth every bit of extra effort! I always make two at a time and freeze one for later.

http://i32.photobucket.com/albums/d10/Bridgedeck/Food/Corned%20Beef/DSCF0814_zps0965fb98.jpg (http://s32.photobucket.com/user/Bridgedeck/media/Food/Corned%20Beef/DSCF0814_zps0965fb98.jpg.html)

Chip-skiff
01-15-2014, 01:41 PM
The first I ate was canned hash, with bits of potatoes and onion and who knows what else, on camping trips. When I left home, I discovered the stuff in the tapered can and made my own hash. Also used it on sandwiches with mustard, mayo, lettuce. I like the slightly rank flavor— perhaps some atavistic fondness for carrion— and still buy a can each year or so, when I feel nostalgic. For actual meals, I simmer whole brisket, as lean as can be found, in the requisite spices. The leftover brisket is prized sandwich filling (for me, anyhow).

An old yachting mate (old=British Marine in the WWII invasion of Italy) is terribly keen on the stuff, which he calls "bully beef," and always brings a good supply on cruises. He likes it in hash, heated up on toast, with or without a scratch gravy, and flaked in with steamed cabbage or spuds. He also loves Spam. Another wartime delicacy was tripe stew, which he learned from the Italians, with tomatoes and spices— we get that at the last anchorage of a cruise.

cathouse willy
01-15-2014, 01:46 PM
home made pastrami and a reuban sammy. the slaw is optional but the pickle is required.



http://i1202.photobucket.com/albums/bb368/cathousewilly/001.jpg (http://s1202.photobucket.com/user/cathousewilly/media/001.jpg.html)



http://i1202.photobucket.com/albums/bb368/cathousewilly/2011_1103pastrami0003.jpg (http://s1202.photobucket.com/user/cathousewilly/media/2011_1103pastrami0003.jpg.html)

Mrleft8
01-15-2014, 05:54 PM
Amateurs. :rolleyes:

Lew Barrett
01-15-2014, 08:01 PM
In the world I grew up in most things started by opening a can...


Our New Yorkers have a treat in store for you should you ever get there! Good corned beef is part of their gestalt.

Donn
01-15-2014, 08:12 PM
The first corned beef I had in NYC was sold as Koshered Beef. Fine brisket. I bought a sandwich in an Irish Pub.

cathouse willy
01-15-2014, 09:50 PM
Amateurs. :rolleyes:
I take exemption to that. Fresh brisket,cured for 6 days,rest for 2 more,hot smoke/cook another day and a further rest of 3 to 4 days in the fridge before serving and I'm an amateur. Hmmmph!.....:)

Jim Bow
01-15-2014, 11:44 PM
Used to be a Samoan grocery store in West Seattle. Shelves and shelves of this stiff:
http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-l7Rl95m9bzI/T0Z2J0HQ67I/AAAAAAAAOYs/xzQAEdcg5XM/s1600/01.JPG

paulf
01-16-2014, 12:02 AM
Next time your in Port Townsend (if Ever) Go to the Blue Moose Cafe in Boat Haven Ship Yard . Order the Corned Beef Hash. Real roasted brisket, Fresh potatoes Wala wala sweet onions, best ever!

elf
01-16-2014, 01:04 AM
Beef brisket brined in some combination of salt and other spices. Jewish corned beef should be brown. Corned beef does not come out of a can, altho corned beef hash does.

Lew Barrett
01-16-2014, 03:25 PM
Perhaps it is different in different cultural cuisines. A 'New York Style' corned beef is a gourmet meat.... and pastrami is a corned beef that has been rubbed with spices, and smoked... it's traditionally served hot, sliced to order, on a really good caraway rye bread, with mustard.

When I came to college in Boston, I noted that the school cafeteria served what they called 'pastrami'.... it was slices, simmering in a liquid or broth of some kind, soggy and tasting mostly of salt. That's NOT pastrami, to a New York Jew :)

We can claim the product in its highest form, but that doesn't deny the right of other cultures to do it their way. Yet in the end, there can be only one!


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sqcLjcSloXs

bobbys
01-16-2014, 03:36 PM
I buy 2 corned beefs, put them in the crock pot in the morn with carrots, potatoes and add cabbage at the end.

After 8 hours it's fit to eat.
next day sandwiches..

Rye bread only with deli mustard.

next day cut up fine with potatoes and onion for cornbeef trash.
I always called it trash and now the kids ask for their trash.

but it's always good.