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View Full Version : Loctite is an Aussie product?



oznabrag
01-15-2014, 10:18 AM
Hoodathunkit?

Bob Adams
01-15-2014, 10:19 AM
Henkel is Austrailian?

oznabrag
01-15-2014, 10:23 AM
Henkel is Austrailian?
Does Henkel make thread locker?

Bob Adams
01-15-2014, 10:24 AM
Henkel owns Locktite.

Ian McColgin
01-15-2014, 10:26 AM
From Wikipedia

In 1953, American professor Vernon Krieble developed anaerobic threadlocking adhesives in his basement laboratory at Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut. Krieble’s company, American Sealants, founded the Loctite brand, which was promoted as ushering in a new era of mechanical reliability by eliminating the vibrational loosening of mechanical fasteners, a frequent cause of machine failure.[1] In 1956, the name Loctite was chosen by Krieble’s daughter-in-law. The Loctite sealant made its official public debut at a press conference at the University Club of New York on July 26 of that year.
In 1963, American Sealants changed its name to the Loctite Corporation. After Vernon Krieble's death in 1964, his son Robert H. Krieble, also a chemist, served as chief executive until 1985.
In 1964, Loctite introduced cyanoacrylate adhesives (a repackaged Eastman product, invented at Eastman Kodak in 1942), also known as “Super Glue”.[2] It was the first of many new products, including silicones, epoxies, acrylics and the development of new Loctite anaerobics. The 1980s brought about the addition of a line of micro anaerobic adhesives.[3]
In 1997, Loctite was acquired as a flagship brand by Henkel, a German Fortune 500 company. Since then, Loctite has remained a primary Henkel brand and a supplier of household adhesives, epoxies, spray adhesives, construction adhesives and home repair, sealants and fillers. In recent years, the company has increased its focus on green and sustainable technologies.[4]

oznabrag
01-15-2014, 10:27 AM
Wait for it, Bob. <no smileys on the phone. Sorry>

oznabrag
01-15-2014, 10:31 AM
From Wikipedia

In 1953, American professor Vernon Krieble developed anaerobic threadlocking ...

ahem..

slug
01-15-2014, 10:32 AM
From Wikipedia

In 1953, American professor Vernon Krieble developed anaerobic threadlocking adhesives in his basement laboratory at Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut. Krieble’s company, American Sealants, founded the Loctite brand, which was promoted as ushering in a new era of mechanical reliability by eliminating the vibrational loosening of mechanical fasteners, a frequent cause of machine failure.[1] In 1956, the name Loctite was chosen by Krieble’s daughter-in-law. The Loctite sealant made its official public debut at a press conference at the University Club of New York on July 26 of that year.
In 1963, American Sealants changed its name to the Loctite Corporation. After Vernon Krieble's death in 1964, his son Robert H. Krieble, also a chemist, served as chief executive until 1985.
In 1964, Loctite introduced cyanoacrylate adhesives (a repackaged Eastman product, invented at Eastman Kodak in 1942), also known as “Super Glue”.[2] It was the first of many new products, including silicones, epoxies, acrylics and the development of new Loctite anaerobics. The 1980s brought about the addition of a line of micro anaerobic adhesives.[3]
In 1997, Loctite was acquired as a flagship brand by Henkel, a German Fortune 500 company. Since then, Loctite has remained a primary Henkel brand and a supplier of household adhesives, epoxies, spray adhesives, construction adhesives and home repair, sealants and fillers. In recent years, the company has increased its focus on green and sustainable technologies.[4]


Hmm...the correct name for a self locking fastener is a pelleted fastener.

http://apmhexseal.com/threadlockers.aspx

the common name that everyone knows is NYLOCK.

What is the trademark history behind this product.

stevebaby
01-15-2014, 10:39 AM
The last time I went to buy Loctite, from a specialty fastener dealer, they had run out of it. The old bloke behind the counter (older than me even) told me to use a drop of the cheapest clear nail polish I could find.
Never bought Loctite since.

stevebaby
01-15-2014, 10:40 AM
The last time I went to buy Loctite, from a specialty fastener dealer, they had run out of it. The old bloke behind the counter (older than me even) told me to use a drop of the cheapest clear nail polish I could find.
Never bought Loctite since.Never had a nut come loose in thirty years either.

bogdog
01-15-2014, 10:48 AM
I know plenty of loose nuts...

slug
01-15-2014, 10:51 AM
Never had a nut come loose in thirty years either.
Careful..many threadlockers are also lubricants. The lubricant is to prevent thread galling. Significant with stainless steel

bogdog
01-15-2014, 10:56 AM
Careful..many threadlockers are also lubricants. The lubricant is to prevent thread galling. Significant with stainless steel I kinda noticed that on 48 feet of ash gunwale once.

stevebaby
01-15-2014, 10:58 AM
Horses for courses. I don't doubt that you're absolutely correct.

Phillip Allen
01-15-2014, 10:59 AM
Never had a nut come loose in thirty years either.

Oh, Steve... there's all sorts of nuts loose in the bilge :)

(one just put locktite on his thread :)

Bob Adams
01-15-2014, 11:04 AM
The last time I went to buy Loctite, from a specialty fastener dealer, they had run out of it. The old bloke behind the counter (older than me even) told me to use a drop of the cheapest clear nail polish I could find.
Never bought Loctite since.


That does suffice most of the time. I don't think I'd use it on an aircraft or nuke plant though.

stevebaby
01-15-2014, 11:21 AM
That does suffice most of the time. I don't think I'd use it on an aircraft or nuke plant though.Neither would I (!), but then I've never had to.