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Paul
01-24-2001, 08:31 AM
Does anyone have a source for fin head bolts that can be custom ordered?

Paul
01-24-2001, 08:31 AM
Does anyone have a source for fin head bolts that can be custom ordered?

Paul
01-24-2001, 08:31 AM
Does anyone have a source for fin head bolts that can be custom ordered?

trull
01-24-2001, 09:48 AM
You might consider making your own. Not all that difficult once a die is made. I have made many from bronze rod. SS is a bit trickier.

trull
01-24-2001, 09:48 AM
You might consider making your own. Not all that difficult once a die is made. I have made many from bronze rod. SS is a bit trickier.

trull
01-24-2001, 09:48 AM
You might consider making your own. Not all that difficult once a die is made. I have made many from bronze rod. SS is a bit trickier.

Ed Harrow
01-24-2001, 11:21 AM
Look in the back of our sponsor's magazine...

Ed Harrow
01-24-2001, 11:21 AM
Look in the back of our sponsor's magazine...

Ed Harrow
01-24-2001, 11:21 AM
Look in the back of our sponsor's magazine...

Thad
01-24-2001, 11:27 AM
I think you have to talk to McClave, Philbrick and Giblin, Stonington, CN 860-572-7710

Thad
01-24-2001, 11:27 AM
I think you have to talk to McClave, Philbrick and Giblin, Stonington, CN 860-572-7710

Thad
01-24-2001, 11:27 AM
I think you have to talk to McClave, Philbrick and Giblin, Stonington, CN 860-572-7710

Paul
01-24-2001, 05:54 PM
Thad, I gave your source a call.....very nice people. They didn't have any 7/16" stock made up and I only need two bolts. I spoke with Andy and he filled me in on how to make the fin heads.....So Tull, looks like I will be rolling my own. Thanks!

Paul
01-24-2001, 05:54 PM
Thad, I gave your source a call.....very nice people. They didn't have any 7/16" stock made up and I only need two bolts. I spoke with Andy and he filled me in on how to make the fin heads.....So Tull, looks like I will be rolling my own. Thanks!

Paul
01-24-2001, 05:54 PM
Thad, I gave your source a call.....very nice people. They didn't have any 7/16" stock made up and I only need two bolts. I spoke with Andy and he filled me in on how to make the fin heads.....So Tull, looks like I will be rolling my own. Thanks!

T.KAMILA
01-25-2001, 05:13 AM
OK, what’s a fin head bolt and how is it used?

Tom

T.KAMILA
01-25-2001, 05:13 AM
OK, what’s a fin head bolt and how is it used?

Tom

T.KAMILA
01-25-2001, 05:13 AM
OK, what’s a fin head bolt and how is it used?

Tom

rbgarr
01-25-2001, 11:33 AM
A fin head bolt is an upscale version of a carriage bolt. Instead of a squared section of shank just below the rounded bolt head, a fin head bolt has thin "wedges' like the web between your thumb and forefinger from the shank to the flat bolt head. These can be used for bolting on something like a cleat where you want to keep a smooth surface (no slot like in a slotted bolt) varnished.

Originally posted by T.KAMILA:
OK, what’s a fin head bolt and how is it used?

Tom

rbgarr
01-25-2001, 11:33 AM
A fin head bolt is an upscale version of a carriage bolt. Instead of a squared section of shank just below the rounded bolt head, a fin head bolt has thin "wedges' like the web between your thumb and forefinger from the shank to the flat bolt head. These can be used for bolting on something like a cleat where you want to keep a smooth surface (no slot like in a slotted bolt) varnished.

Originally posted by T.KAMILA:
OK, what’s a fin head bolt and how is it used?

Tom

rbgarr
01-25-2001, 11:33 AM
A fin head bolt is an upscale version of a carriage bolt. Instead of a squared section of shank just below the rounded bolt head, a fin head bolt has thin "wedges' like the web between your thumb and forefinger from the shank to the flat bolt head. These can be used for bolting on something like a cleat where you want to keep a smooth surface (no slot like in a slotted bolt) varnished.

Originally posted by T.KAMILA:
OK, what’s a fin head bolt and how is it used?

Tom

Ed Harrow
01-25-2001, 04:53 PM
Reportedly they are more water tight than a carriage bolt (for deck purposes, not below the waterline!).

Ed Harrow
01-25-2001, 04:53 PM
Reportedly they are more water tight than a carriage bolt (for deck purposes, not below the waterline!).

Ed Harrow
01-25-2001, 04:53 PM
Reportedly they are more water tight than a carriage bolt (for deck purposes, not below the waterline!).

Syd MacDonald
01-25-2001, 09:42 PM
Do you drive the fins across the grain or with the grain?

Syd MacDonald
01-25-2001, 09:42 PM
Do you drive the fins across the grain or with the grain?

Syd MacDonald
01-25-2001, 09:42 PM
Do you drive the fins across the grain or with the grain?

Paul
01-26-2001, 07:46 AM
The fin head bolt was developed by Herreshoff and used for floor timbers and keel ballast timbers. Why wouldn't they be used for below water applications?

Paul
01-26-2001, 07:46 AM
The fin head bolt was developed by Herreshoff and used for floor timbers and keel ballast timbers. Why wouldn't they be used for below water applications?

Paul
01-26-2001, 07:46 AM
The fin head bolt was developed by Herreshoff and used for floor timbers and keel ballast timbers. Why wouldn't they be used for below water applications?

rbgarr
01-26-2001, 07:01 PM
With the grain, and I am also wondering why they could not be used below the waterline http://media5.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/confused.gif
Originally posted by Syd MacDonald:
Do you drive the fins across the grain or with the grain?

rbgarr
01-26-2001, 07:01 PM
With the grain, and I am also wondering why they could not be used below the waterline http://media5.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/confused.gif
Originally posted by Syd MacDonald:
Do you drive the fins across the grain or with the grain?

rbgarr
01-26-2001, 07:01 PM
With the grain, and I am also wondering why they could not be used below the waterline http://media5.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/confused.gif
Originally posted by Syd MacDonald:
Do you drive the fins across the grain or with the grain?

Ed Harrow
01-26-2001, 09:39 PM
I know you believe you understand what you thought I said, but I'm not at all certain that what you thought you heard is not what I meant...

I was once told that the fin-head bolt, used say, on a horizontal surface, will do a much better job self sealing its hole than a carriage type of bolt, and would not require a bung. If, however, it were used where large quantities of water existed on one side, and large quantities of air on the other, a bung would be required to prevent a leak.

Maybe true, maybe not.

Ed Harrow
01-26-2001, 09:39 PM
I know you believe you understand what you thought I said, but I'm not at all certain that what you thought you heard is not what I meant...

I was once told that the fin-head bolt, used say, on a horizontal surface, will do a much better job self sealing its hole than a carriage type of bolt, and would not require a bung. If, however, it were used where large quantities of water existed on one side, and large quantities of air on the other, a bung would be required to prevent a leak.

Maybe true, maybe not.

Ed Harrow
01-26-2001, 09:39 PM
I know you believe you understand what you thought I said, but I'm not at all certain that what you thought you heard is not what I meant...

I was once told that the fin-head bolt, used say, on a horizontal surface, will do a much better job self sealing its hole than a carriage type of bolt, and would not require a bung. If, however, it were used where large quantities of water existed on one side, and large quantities of air on the other, a bung would be required to prevent a leak.

Maybe true, maybe not.