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Figment
11-12-2013, 05:01 PM
Who here knows how to sweat a pipe joint?
Evidently we're a rapidly dying breed.

I had a bit of a leak in the basement over the weekend, so I went down to the local (not bigbox) hardware store for some 3/4 copper and an elbow. I had to ask the shopkeeper where he kept the emory cloth, since it was nowhere near the fittings.

"so.... who sent you?" he asks. Odd, I thought.

He says that in the past three or four years, he's sold copper fittings to the same three guys over and over again, but that's all. He figured one of those guys was doing some work for me and had sent me on the errand or something. (My 2yr old sidekick in pigtails may have had something to do with that impression) Nobody buys sweat fittings anymore, only the compression fittings and PEX stuff.
He was in discussion with his wholesaler earlier in the month over plans to stop carrying the sweat fittings at the end of this year.

This seems like a silly thing to get hung up on, but I'm hung up on it.
A lot of things I learned from my dad are now pretty much obsolete in the modern world. It sucks to add one more thing to that list.

bogdog
11-12-2013, 05:09 PM
I sweat pipe to make copper arched arbors, waste copper on plumbing, good heavens no!

Willin'
11-12-2013, 05:10 PM
I had to sweat back together a horribly disfigured copper pipe handrail tee on a boat last summer. It had been so badly mushroomed I thought it was hopeless and the whole handrail would need to be replaced. I called the local ol' Maine geezer and he taught me how to close up a mushroomed fitting with a hammer and backer block and it sweated up as strong and tight as a water pipe.

Screw those compression fittings. They're for slackers.

McMike
11-12-2013, 05:10 PM
Taught myself a few years ago, I'm not as neat as a pro but my work gets the job done.

John of Phoenix
11-12-2013, 05:16 PM
Taught myself a few years ago, I'm not as neat as a pro but my work gets the job done.Same here and didn't even come close to burning the house down either.

bogdog
11-12-2013, 05:18 PM
Screw those compression fittings. They're for slackers.If you're running pex there's no other way and truth is pex doesn't waste as much water as copper in the average home.

Mrleft8
11-12-2013, 05:30 PM
If you're running pex there's no other way and truth is pex doesn't waste as much water as copper in the average home.

BS. PEX is garbage.

Sweating copper with proper solder, is the proper way to do the job. It may not be as fast, or as cheap, but it's the right way to do it.

bogdog
11-12-2013, 05:36 PM
BS. PEX is garbage.

Sweating copper with proper solder, is the proper way to do the job. It may not be as fast, or as cheap, but it's the right way to do it.

Keep saying that as water rates continue to go up and half of what you pay for is down the drain before ya get to use it. Sweating copper for home plumbing is a fools errand if it's new construction.

Shang
11-12-2013, 05:38 PM
I've sweated a lot of copper in years gone by, but in town the water is so caustic that copper begins to leak in a year or three.
Those of us who know that, don't drink the water here.
Up at the lake copper lasts forever.

Paul Pless
11-12-2013, 05:42 PM
Taught myself a few years ago, I'm not as neat as a pro but my work gets the job done.

flux!

John of Phoenix
11-12-2013, 05:45 PM
How does water get wasted/saved in either system?

Mrleft8
11-12-2013, 05:45 PM
New imported copper pipe is fraught with issues, no doubt. There are wall thickness variables that are problematic in systems with any kind of abrasive issues....(Sandy wells etc.)
But proper copper is still better than plastic in almost every case in areas with" sweet" water.

Mrleft8
11-12-2013, 05:46 PM
flux!

Flux you!

MiddleAgesMan
11-12-2013, 06:30 PM
I still sweat copper water pipes. That's what was used when my old house was built so it's what I use for additions and repairs. I forget how I learned it, maybe in Machinist's shop class or maybe by trial and error.

When I did an addition about ten years ago I had to re-do one leaky joint out of several dozen so it's certainly something any jack-leg mechanic can pick up in a few hours. Just be sure to test before closing up the space.

SMARTINSEN
11-12-2013, 06:38 PM
Keep saying that as water rates continue to go up and half of what you pay for is down the drain before ya get to use it. Sweating copper for home plumbing is a fools errand if it's new construction.


I do believe that most new residential construction these days is with PEX.

bogdog
11-12-2013, 07:29 PM
A well designed pex system contains less water/ft of pipe than any copper system. Pex from each fixture is fed to a separate manifold, either hot or cold, which in turn is fed to either the hot or cold water supply. When you turn on the hot water because there is less water in the line there is less water going down the drain before the water comes to temperature. When the cold is turned on there is no hot water in the line so cold water is almost instantaneous.

Chip-skiff
11-12-2013, 07:32 PM
I was taught the art of sweating copper tubing by my dear departed Da. Here's the pump tree for the greenhouse solar collector having a pressure test.

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-ShjKIDlGtL4/TYbE8bVjaJI/AAAAAAAABPA/si-8ecoEsOc/s550/apumptree.jpg

I still use it where necessary, but am a great fan of Shark Bite fittings and PEX tubing for all else.

Garret
11-12-2013, 08:00 PM
No way can stores around here stop selling copper pipe & fittings - there are just too many houses with copper pipe.

Even if you want to use pex, if it's an old house, you have sweat a pex fitting onto the copper. However, in a new house I'd go with pex over copper for sure.

There's no doubt that sweating a fitting is more satisfying then crimping pex, but it's really not very hard. Good torch make a big difference.

Paul Pless
11-12-2013, 08:12 PM
Even if you want to use pex, if it's an old house, you have sweat a pex fitting onto the copper. they make pex fittings that will clamp directly to copper. . .

StevenBauer
11-12-2013, 08:22 PM
Even if you want to use pex, if it's an old house, you have sweat a pex fitting onto the copper.

Or just use a Sharkbite. They work on PEX and copper.


Steven

delecta
11-12-2013, 08:33 PM
How long will PEX last? I have a good idea how long copper will last. I built my house in 2001 and it is the last house I used all copper, all PEX since. The major problem I have with PEX is that it is impossible to make the same quality appearance in the basement as with a good copper job. Perhaps at first it was treated the same as copper but now it is run like snakes in the grass, skipping 90's and just bending it here and there.

I'm tempted to do the next house with all copper in the basement and pex where hidden.

Garret
11-12-2013, 08:56 PM
Or just use a Sharkbite. They work on PEX and copper.


Steven

Thanks. I've read about 'em, but I mistrust puncture fittings. Call me an old fart.

Canoez
11-12-2013, 09:00 PM
Same here and didn't even come close to burning the house down either.

LOL! SWMBO gave me grief about doing my own plumbing to replace a shower tree with all sweat fittings. She thought I was going to burn down the house or wind up with a leaky assembly. Looked nice before I closed it up behind the wall.

bogdog
11-12-2013, 09:00 PM
PEX can be messy. https://www.ridgidforum.com/forum/attachments/11111d1276210277-2008_1012firstshots0021.jpg

C. Ross
11-12-2013, 09:00 PM
Every drop of water in my house goes through joints I sweat fitted. It was like building the last steam locomotive apparently.

oznabrag
11-12-2013, 09:11 PM
Thanks. I've read about 'em, but I mistrust puncture fittings. Call me an old fart.

Puncture?

wizbang 13
11-12-2013, 09:53 PM
The house that I built in 1981 is all sweat ,
and the house that in i built in 1986 is the same .
I do not even know what this new stuff is .
I still own both houses.

oldsub86
11-12-2013, 10:08 PM
Copper is getting expensive and harder to come by. I really dislike the sharkbite fittings and the silly copper fittings with the solder built into them. To my mind that is just weird. I have been switching part of my house over to Pex as I have been redoing a bath on the second floor and running new 3/4 pipe from the basement to the second floor. Nice to do it all in one piece. Also ran a 3rd line to act as a thermal siphon so hot water will be there faster.

Rich Jones
11-12-2013, 10:24 PM
I've always used copper in all the renovation jobs I did myself. Once PEX came into common use, I just couldn't be bothered learning a new trick for the small plumbing jobs I did. Whenever I had a big job, I subbed it out to a plumber who ran PEX all over the place. He loved the stuff because he could plumb a house in half the time.
When I built the house I'm living in now, I did all the plumbing myself with copper. That was 15 years ago. I just had a big extension built two years ago, but I still plumbed it with copper. Just didn't want to teach this old dog a new trick.

Oysterhouse
11-12-2013, 10:57 PM
I can sweat copper as fast and neatly as anybody, but I run a lot of PEX, and I prefer PEX to copper. I run all of my PEX "on the square" and it makes for a very neat job----even in exposed basements.

The quality of any job depends on the skill of the craftsman, and a jackleg can make just as big of a snarled mess with copper as he can with PEX---the copper mess just cost more.

Ron Williamson
11-12-2013, 11:12 PM
Melting metal with fire is fun.
And manly.
R

Michael D. Storey
11-13-2013, 07:05 AM
BS. PEX is garbage.

Sweating copper with proper solder, is the proper way to do the job. It may not be as fast, or as cheap, but it's the right way to do it.

Where we goin with this proper biz? As long as it does not leak, or contaminate me, and it lasts, what else do you need? We making water pipe or jewelry? I find that when work calls for a repair, those little shark bite thingies save having to completely drain the pipe, can be done in the wall with minimal cutting of the rock and are quick. All good things, especially on some one else's dime.
Water pipe? CPVC. Flexible, cheap, as permanent as plumbing gets. No screwin around.
BTW I can melt and pour lead on top of oakum to seal up a cast iron pipe if I have to. Doesn't mean that I do it.

StevenBauer
11-13-2013, 07:56 AM
Thanks. I've read about 'em, but I mistrust puncture fittings. Call me an old fart.


Puncture?

Sharkbites don't puncture. They just slip over the end of the pipe, copper or PEX, and you push them until they click. You can even use a little plastic tool to un-fasten them if you need to. I was skeptical at first but now I even see real plumbers using them, not just hackers like us. ;)


Steven

Michael D. Storey
11-13-2013, 08:05 AM
Melting metal with fire is fun.
And manly.
R

I made a back yard shower out of copper for Jenifer's grandchildren years ago. It's fun to play with. I showed the Baby Girl (read favorite grand daughter) how to melt solder and hook scraps together. Big deal when you are four or five.

Nicholas Scheuer
11-13-2013, 08:18 AM
I sweat copper any time I'm modifying our copper supply pipe system. Last time was when installing a new freeze-proof hydrant. I've got another freeze-proof hydrant to install on the opposite side of the house. No big deal. Lots of copper fittings available from various sources here. Should one of them discontinue handling copper, I won't be going back to that store for anything.

oznabrag
11-13-2013, 10:10 AM
Sharkbites don't puncture. They just slip over the end of the pipe, copper or PEX, and you push them until they click. You can even use a little plastic tool to un-fasten them if you need to. I was skeptical at first but now I even see real plumbers using them, not just hackers like us. ;)


Steven

I didn't THINK so!

I wonder what Garret is on about?

Bobby of Tulsa
11-13-2013, 10:19 AM
Going on eight years here, Sharkbites and Pex doing fine.

bogdog
11-13-2013, 10:33 AM
I didn't THINK so!

I wonder what Garret is on about?
I'm thinking he believes the fittings punch holes in the pipe because of the oneway ringteeth: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HhWNTqTVgXc

Bobby of Tulsa
11-13-2013, 10:41 AM
I have a one of those puncture fittings for the ice maker in the fridg. been there about 25 years now, hope that sucker don't start leaking.

Figment
11-13-2013, 10:54 AM
Why not? if it does you'll just cut out the offending section of pipe and sharkbite-in a new piece, right? ;)
(couldn't resist)

The thurst of the thread was really this:
A lot of things I learned from my dad are now pretty much obsolete in the modern world. It sucks to add one more thing to that list.

Sweat joints.
Tuning an engine with a timing light.
Beating a tire off a beadlock rim without bashing yourself in the head with the sledge on the rebound.
Chart navigation with a walking ruler and dividers.
Shining shoes.

Kinda makes me wonder what things I'm teaching the youngers will be obsolete 30 years from now :rolleyes:

Paul Pless
11-13-2013, 10:59 AM
i still shine my shoes

Bobby of Tulsa
11-13-2013, 11:20 AM
I can do,four outa five of those things, and none of them would really benefit anyone I know,

Bobby of Tulsa
11-13-2013, 11:22 AM
i still shine my shoes But can you see yourself in them? Do you just spit on them or use alcohol on them.

Breakaway
11-13-2013, 12:11 PM
I have a copper-plumbed house. I can and have sweated pipe. But Steven Bauer has it right-- I was turned on to Sharkbite fittings and have not looked back. For retro/ repair work like inside the vanity or next to a wall: hands down easier and as good as using a torch and solder.

Kevin

Oysterhouse
11-13-2013, 12:19 PM
I gotta' say that as gung-ho as I am about PEX, I'm still on the fence about using the sharkbites.

I use them in limited circumstances, but I am a little nervous about them, and have seen them fail when exposed to vibration (like near a circulatory pump in a boiler heating application).

Breakaway
11-13-2013, 12:24 PM
Sweat joints.
Tuning an engine with a timing light.
Beating a tire off a beadlock rim without bashing yourself in the head with the sledge on the rebound.
Chart navigation with a walking ruler and dividers.
Shining shoes.

I am sure we can add:

sharpen a knife
start a fire
drive a nail
....

Kevin

xflow7
11-13-2013, 12:47 PM
I can sweat a pipe, although I'd never swear to be as neat and efficient as a pro.

On the sharkbite fittings, it's interesting to note that fittings operating on pretty much the same principle are used all over the place on commercial air-brake systems operating at 100+ psi, particularly in Europe but FMVSS listed versions are available for use in the US as well. In my experience with them on air-brake systems, they are useful and reliable provided they're installed correctly (i.e. hose ends undamaged, etc.) - like anything really.

Dave

Bobby of Tulsa
11-13-2013, 01:00 PM
I can show you how to harness a span of mules, or how to set a plow on your tractor so it plows right, I can teach you how to know when to take the milkers off of a cow or even how to milk by hand. These things don't mean much anymore

Jefferson
11-13-2013, 01:03 PM
Taught myself a few years ago, I'm not as neat as a pro but my work gets the job done.

Same here, I've redone all the plumbing in our house. Its not hard.

Rick

P.I. Stazzer-Newt
11-13-2013, 01:21 PM
Has anyone else seen the mess one small mouse can make with a PEX water pipe and a three storey house?

Garret
11-13-2013, 04:03 PM
I'm thinking he believes the fittings punch holes in the pipe because of the oneway ringteeth: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HhWNTqTVgXc

Nope - I was thinking of adding one in the middle of a pipe (IOW where you'd use a Tee if doing regular copper).

Michael D. Storey
11-13-2013, 05:38 PM
Why not? if it does you'll just cut out the offending section of pipe and sharkbite-in a new piece, right? ;)
(couldn't resist)

The thurst of the thread was really this:
A lot of things I learned from my dad are now pretty much obsolete in the modern world. It sucks to add one more thing to that list.

Sweat joints.
Tuning an engine with a timing light.
Beating a tire off a beadlock rim without bashing yourself in the head with the sledge on the rebound.
Chart navigation with a walking ruler and dividers.
Shining shoes.

Kinda makes me wonder what things I'm teaching the youngers will be obsolete 30 years from now :rolleyes:

Was a time every one of those things was the cutting edge of technology/style.
Nothin lasts for long.
Be proud that you have depth greater than now.

Stiletto
11-13-2013, 05:52 PM
Copper fittings are still relatively common here in NZ but are brazed together, not soldered. I have reservations about using anything with lead in it for potable water.

Michael D. Storey
11-13-2013, 06:15 PM
Copper fittings are still relatively common here in NZ but are brazed together, not soldered. I have reservations about using anything with lead in it for potable water.

We have laws that require the use of lead-free solder here in the United States, when soldering drinking water lines.

Figment
11-03-2016, 09:02 AM
Jim Bow's Copper plumbing (http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthread.php?214415-Copper-plumbing) thread reminded me of this thread. I figured any non-political thread was worth a bump this week, so here we are.

Another lost art in the modern world: Giving clear and concise driving directions!

The Boy is in that "new driver" phase, which in CT prohibits ANY use of cellphones for any purpose, hands-free or not, including for navigation. So he stops to ask for directions a lot. He's noticed that when I don't answer the phone and he has to call mom or a friend, the directions tend to be rather.... nonlinear.

Upshur
11-03-2016, 09:05 AM
BS. PEX is garbage.

Sweating copper with proper solder, is the proper way to do the job. It may not be as fast, or as cheap, but it's the right way to do it. pleas tell me why pex is garbage...my wife wants to redo all the pipes in the basement with it...hurry!

Garret
11-03-2016, 09:07 AM
pleas tell me why pex is garbage...my wife wants to redo all the pipes in the basement with it...hurry!

He's banned - so you won't be hearing from him soon...

Dan McCosh
11-03-2016, 10:18 AM
I didn't know it was possible to sweat pipe--I thought it had to be threaded. Sweating copper tubing is pretty simple. Putting out the rafter you set on fire can be tricky.

Canoeyawl
11-03-2016, 11:24 AM
I can sweat a pipe joint, no sweat. But who here can compound mitre a copper ogee gutter with a mitered return?

(Or use "lead" as a body seam filler?)

PeterSibley
11-03-2016, 05:38 PM
I "sweat " copper every time..... unless I will need to take a fitting off in which case I use compression fittings.

Al G
11-03-2016, 05:51 PM
Pex is way better than copper. I just made me a real nice reflux still out of it. My moonshine doesn't just get you drunk, it gets you high!

Stiletto
11-03-2016, 06:12 PM
Here in NZ it has been the practice to use silphos or brazing wire, lead based solders are considered unacceptable for potable water.

Having said that, I learned how to sweat copper at school at around 12 years of age when I made my Mum a candlestick holder out of copper.

delecta
11-03-2016, 06:15 PM
I can sweat a pipe joint, no sweat. But who here can compound mitre a copper ogee gutter with a mitered return?

(Or use "lead" as a body seam filler?)

I restored a 1956 Continental Mark II, there was a lot of "leading" in that construction that I had to repair and I got you all covered on the mitered returns. Having the right tools and the right material make it pretty simple for the leading, the miters are simple, as are the returns.

Garret
11-03-2016, 07:04 PM
Here in NZ it has been the practice to use silphos or brazing wire, lead based solders are considered unacceptable for potable water.

Having said that, I learned how to sweat copper at school at around 12 years of age when I made my Mum a candlestick holder out of copper.

We are required to use lead-free solder - high tin content (tin/silver, or tin/silver/copper). It's tougher to solder with - but does keep the lead out.

Stiletto
11-03-2016, 07:23 PM
We are required to use lead-free solder - high tin content (tin/silver, or tin/silver/copper). It's tougher to solder with - but does keep the lead out.

OK, pretty much the same as here then, Although what we use can be called silver solder, here the term solder is generally thought to refer to lead based products, hence my misunderstanding of what you guys use.

I see that my post echoed what I had posted 3 years ago, I hadnt realised that until now.

pipefitter
11-04-2016, 01:57 AM
I came up in plumbing for a number of years via well work. Having to adapt to existing plumbing, and having the license for anything else they wanted fixed relative to their house water. At any rate, I know a lot of plumbers. None of them will choose the shark fittings over threads or sweat from a quality standpoint. Claiming sometimes it takes them awhile to leak.

Whenever I do a repair, I forget what fittings I have so I buy more and always more than enough pipe. So now I have a pretty good stock of copper, with both hard and soft.

I'd be tempted to use 316 stainless steel in a home for myself that I cared about. Not to mention that it would look cool.

epoxyboy
11-04-2016, 03:40 AM
pleas tell me why pex is garbage...my wife wants to redo all the pipes in the basement with it...hurry!
I ripped out all the 80yo corroded, gunged up galvanised iron pipe from our cottage way back in 1992, and replaced it with PEX. No problems so far. It is dead easy to work with, and makes relocating bits (as we had to do during a total kitchen refit) a ten minute job.
It also doesnt freeze as fast as copper, doesn't split if it does freeze unlike copper (ymmv in stupidly cold places) doesn't bang and clank if you have water hammer, unlike copper. Doesn't corrode, ever, unlike copper.
Yeah, it total garbage. In fact it is so bad, I replumbed another house with it in 1997 - the one we live in - and no problems there either. Garbage. Dont use it. You'll never have the joy of polishing your plumbing, if you use PEX.

Pete

Nicholas Scheuer
11-04-2016, 03:59 AM
I don't do copper often, but I still can do a decent job of it in our 80-yr-old home. When I think about it, I'm surprised at how much PVC DWV I use, for not-plumbing applications.

Boater14
11-04-2016, 08:01 AM
Here we go. Use a legal pad cause you just can't write on a computer. Can't read a book on an iPad. Can't sail without Egyptian cotton sails. Turn down a synthetic stent in the old coronary artery?

Michael D. Storey
11-04-2016, 03:37 PM
Screw those compression fittings. They're for slackers.Or for people needing to fix pipe that has water running through it, or in a space where the use of a torch could burn the house down.

delecta
11-04-2016, 03:45 PM
Or for people needing to fix pipe that has water running through it, or in a space where the use of a torch could burn the house down.

Yup, almost impossible to sweat a pipe with water in it. Nah, it is impossible :)

Phil Y
11-04-2016, 03:48 PM
I've been using a crimped copper system, because we live in the country and get rodents from time to time, so don't trust pex, and working under a timber floor don't want to burn the house down.

woodpile
11-04-2016, 05:03 PM
Sharkbites don't puncture. They just slip over the end of the pipe, copper or PEX, and you push them until they click. You can even use a little plastic tool to un-fasten them if you need to. I was skeptical at first but now I even see real plumbers using them, not just hackers like us. ;)Steven


Just added a sill cock to the north end to get closer the garden, was always skeptical of plastic water feed lines but my local plumbing guy convinced me when he told me a plastic line would be fine and would be significantly less than the cost of running copper. I ran the plastic across the basement and had them do the connections. They just consisted of a memory plastic sleeve that went over the plastic line, an expansion tool was used to expand the sleeve and the tubing and it was quickly attached to a serrated fitting attached to the copper and............no leaks. Pretty amazing polymer technology. Don't know if I built another house I would use it throughout, plumber said it cut's install time almost in half.

Figment
01-17-2017, 03:20 PM
Adding another item to the list of things Dad taught me which will soon be obsolete in the modern world: How to use a look-it-up book at the parts store.

The subaru has a dead headlight, so I brought The Boy to the parts store to teach him how to buy his own goddamn headlight bulb. Step one: find your car in The Book.
What book? I don't see any book.

Dammit he's right. No book in the lightbulbs aisle. Nor in the filters aisle either. Advance Auto has done away with all such books. Gotta go to the counter and ask which bulb you need, then back out into the store to find it.

I assume this is because they got tired of people coming up to the counter and asking how to read the damn book.

Paul Pless
01-17-2017, 03:27 PM
Gotta go to the counter and ask which bulb you need, then back out into the store to find it.or you could just google it :D

Paul Pless
01-17-2017, 03:27 PM
when do we get a thread on the karman ghia?

Norman Bernstein
01-17-2017, 03:32 PM
I've got zip experience in doing plumbing... but I used Sharkbite adapters to put a new water heater into my boat, and they worked perfectly, with no leaks... and I was actually putting them onto European 15mm semi-rigid tubing, not copper or Pex.

Figment
01-17-2017, 03:45 PM
Google it.... no he just asks Siri for everything. for about half an hour. Then figures if he doesn't have the answer by then it must not exist.

I confess that I personally haven't used the lookup books in a while. My local NAPA is very good with the "order online pickup in store" system. They get an order from me, they know I'll be in at precisely 5:06pm to pick it up and they have it sitting right on the counter for me, I'm in and out in less than 30 seconds.

Karmann thread, yeah I suppose I should get that started.

Breakaway
01-17-2017, 04:06 PM
Gotta go to the counter and ask which bulb you need, then back out into the store to find it.

What's a store?

I needed a new tailight for my Titan recently. Put "make/model/year and left tail light" into Amazon.com and pressed enter.

The light was on my doorstep 2 days later.

Kevin

oznabrag
01-17-2017, 04:25 PM
What's a store?

I needed a new tailight for my Titan recently. Put "make/model/year and left tail light" into Amazon.com and pressed enter.

The light was on my doorstep 2 days later.

Kevin

I got two words for you.

Rock Auto.

Garret
01-17-2017, 04:56 PM
While interweb auto parts have their place, remember that every time you use one, it's one more nail in the coffin of a local parts store - you know - that place where you can go on a Saturday afternoon & pick up a part to finish a project over the weekend...

ETA: I recently got a fantastic price on a Chevy 283 rebuild kit from Summit: pistons, rings, bearings, gaskets, etc. I double-checked at my local parts store & without my mentioning anything about Summit, they beat the price by $30.

Bob Adams
01-17-2017, 04:58 PM
While interweb auto parts have their place, remember that every time you use one, it's one more nail in the coffin of a local parts store - you know - that place where you can go on a Saturday afternoon & pick up a part to finish a project over the weekend...

+1,000

willmarsh3
01-17-2017, 04:59 PM
A couple of bits about the subject...

* When I was about 12 I watched plumbers install a new hot water heater in the house. They sweated the copper joints. They did the pressure relief pipe last. They were in such a hurry to test it though that they let cold water run through it before the sweated joints had a chance to cool. The resulting steam explosion blew the pipe clear off. They had to do that part over again.

* One thing I learned by observation last year is that PEX breaks down in the sunlight. Someone rigged the water service at the docks with PEX. Sunlight shone through the gaps in the dock planks and degraded the PEX until it sprang leaks.

Nicholas Scheuer
01-17-2017, 05:16 PM
Sweating copper ain't real difficult. Why bother with anything else?

oznabrag
01-17-2017, 06:01 PM
While interweb auto parts have their place, remember that every time you use one, it's one more nail in the coffin of a local parts store - you know - that place where you can go on a Saturday afternoon & pick up a part to finish a project over the weekend...

ETA: I recently got a fantastic price on a Chevy 283 rebuild kit from Summit: pistons, rings, bearings, gaskets, etc. I double-checked at my local parts store & without my mentioning anything about Summit, they beat the price by $30.

OK.

Rock Auto is another nail in the coffin of the other internet parts stores.

Garret
01-17-2017, 06:10 PM
I just plumbed my bathroom with pex. Easy peasy. I don't trust shark bites long term, my plumber friend said to use the copper compression rings exclusively for the pex. The tool is expensive but boy, it was so easy and easy to fix if you make a mistake.

As long as you use the test ring on every single joint. Just one popping under pressure can make a real mess.

willmarsh3
01-17-2017, 06:11 PM
Rich Trethewey makes PEX look like a work of art in the basement on This Old House.

Breakaway
01-17-2017, 06:14 PM
http://forum.woodenboat.com/images/misc/quote_icon.png Originally Posted by Garret http://forum.woodenboat.com/images/buttons/viewpost-right.png (http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthread.php?p=5129502#post5129502)

While interweb auto parts have their place, remember that every time you use one, it's one more nail in the coffin of a local parts store - you know - that place where you can go on a Saturday afternoon & pick up a part to finish a project over the weekend...


I hear ya. I used to sing that same song. But more and more, I go to my local merchants and they tell me, " we can order it for you, be hear in a day to two."
Not always. But more and more, to the point where, unless I have to get done today, I don't even bother calling them, I just order online and do something else today.

With houses and boats and trucks and kids and pets and ....there's always more to do than there is time for anyways.

Kevin

Garret
01-17-2017, 06:20 PM
I hear ya. I used to sing that same song. But more and more, I go to my local merchants and they tell me, " we can order it for you, be hear in a day to two."
Not always. But more and more, to the point where, unless I have to get done today, I don't even bother calling them, I just order online and do something else today.

With houses and boats and trucks and kids and pets and ....there's always more to do than there is time for anyways.

Kevin

Totally valid points. I'm lucky enough to have a couple of decent auto parts stores near me. "Decent" meaning "not a national chain that only wants to sell oil filters, air fresheners, & floormats for cars made in the last 5 years". :)

gilberj
01-17-2017, 06:24 PM
Boxing Day...December 26th .....I excavate into the outer wall of my rental house to fix a burst pipe....4 sweated joints later...all is tight.

Cuyahoga Chuck
01-17-2017, 09:11 PM
My father was a journeyman tinsmith. He had a white-gas heater and a set of the old fashioned copper soldering irons he kept at home for side jobs. When I was about 9 or10 he taught me how to solder which I never forgot. When I was about 18 the old galvanized pipes in our house were popping once a month and the side-arm water heater, which had to be turned on and off by hand, had a galvanized tank sported several rot holes that had been gas welded. I was working a night job so I was home when the rest of the family was gone and I had the freedom to shut off the water, install a section of copper and get everything re-connected by the time the other family members came home. When I finished I installed a modern thermostatically controlled, under-fired, gas water heater which brought us into the 20th century and was dearly appreciated by all. It was about that time that we replaced our coal furnace with gas. I didn't have anything to do with that.

Figment
01-18-2017, 10:32 AM
What's a store?

I needed a new tailight for my Titan recently. Put "make/model/year and left tail light" into Amazon.com and pressed enter.

The light was on my doorstep 2 days later.

Kevin

I do take this route frequently with a lot of things (especially with karmann ghia specific items that are only available via ACVW specialists), as became my habit with all boaty items. I've discovered that with car parts, shipping is the dealbreaker. The local brick-and-mortar has the parts in stock or available next day, and after factoring the shipping cost of online purchase, the brick and mortar costs less.