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cs
09-28-2013, 06:09 PM
My neighbor has pretty much smothered my compost pile with grass clippings and it has pretty much quit cooking. I've been trying to keep it turned but there is so much grass in it that it doesn't have a good balance. Leaves are starting to fall so maybe that will restore the balance but he put so much grass in the pile that I won't have much room. I filled up my lawn mower trailer with some of the clippings but after doing that the neighbor just added more. I finally had to tell him to stop.

Any good clues on trying to get it cooking again? I know it will eventually recover but I would like to get it cooking again.

Chad

George Jung
09-28-2013, 06:16 PM
I'm surprised it 'quit cooking' with the grass clippings - usually, when I get a good pile of green clippings, it cooks remarkably well. I like to bag my leaves, and 'layer' them between layers of green grass. I also throw in a few scoops of soil with each layer. On occasion, I'll take my tiller and 'mix it up good'; seems to do the trick.

Peerie Maa
09-28-2013, 06:41 PM
Shred up some cardboard boxes, or empty your filing system through the shredder and mix it in. That will help dilute the green.

wardd
09-28-2013, 06:43 PM
i have a few tons of manure composting, even on the coldest days if you dig into it steam rises

George Jung
09-28-2013, 06:46 PM
You sure that's 'steam'?:p

wardd
09-28-2013, 06:51 PM
You sure that's 'steam'?:p

well i haven't sniffed it

elf
09-28-2013, 06:55 PM
Wood chips will open up the mass.

bogdog
09-28-2013, 06:58 PM
I would think it just needs some mixing. Ya need a good composting fork, rats can also do a go job of turning over the compost too, they like kitchen scraps. I spin mine. The compost I mean.

George Jung
09-28-2013, 06:58 PM
well i haven't sniffed it

What happens when you toss a match at it? (lit, btw)

Chip-skiff
09-28-2013, 07:02 PM
Add brown stuff: dead leaves, soil, coffee grounds, peanut shells, etc. Letting the green stuff wilt and brown before mixing it in helps, too. Grass clippings are dense—if you have a mixing tool, use it regularly to get some air into the heap. I read somewhere that grass clippings actually absorb more nutrients than they release, in the early stages of decomposition. I use commercial compost starters, too.

Donn
09-28-2013, 07:04 PM
Print all the political threads in the Bilge, shred them, and mix it in.

cs
09-28-2013, 07:36 PM
I think one of the biggest problems is the density. I try and turn it with a pitchfork but it is super dense. I'm letting the stuff in the trailer sit for a while and keeping it turned. As it browns I will mix it in and I keep on adding my kitchen scraps and coffee grounds. I have some branches that need chipping so I will try and chip them in.

Chad

George Jung
09-28-2013, 09:17 PM
mixing in 'bilge posts' isn't likely to make it less-dense!:p

Donn
09-28-2013, 09:20 PM
A nice trick for a dense compost pile is to core it.

Take a 1.5-2" iron pipe, and drill a 1/2" hole through one end. Run a 2' length of rebar through that, for the handle.

Sharpen the other end of the pipe, to help you drive it into the pile.

Take a core every square foot of the surface, as deep as you can drive the pipe.

That'll get a bunch of oxygen and water down into the pile, and will help a lot.

Something else that will help is to install a few stacks in it. 4" perforated PVC pipes running bottom-to-top will help aerate and moisturize the pile.

cs
09-28-2013, 09:27 PM
I will try that Donn

Chad

cs
09-29-2013, 05:26 PM
I took out another wheelbarrow full of clippings and chipped some branches into and then mixed it up real good. We will see how it does.

Chad

wardd
09-29-2013, 05:51 PM
I've never had to but i wonder how septic treatment might work