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View Full Version : The new land of opportunity is.... Mexico?



George Jung
09-22-2013, 09:21 AM
Caught this in the Times:
By DAMIEN CAVE (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/c/damien_cave/index.html) Published: September 21, 2013

MEXICO CITY — Mexico, whose economic woes have pushed millions of people north, is increasingly becoming an immigrant destination. The country’s documented foreign-born population nearly doubled between 2000 and 2010, and officials now say the pace is accelerating as broad changes in the global economy create new dynamics of migration.

Rising wages in China and higher transportation costs have made Mexican manufacturing highly competitive again, with some projections suggesting it is already cheaper than China for many industries serving the American market. Europe is sputtering, pushing workers away. And while Mexico’s economy is far from trouble free, its growth easily outpaced the giants of the hemisphere — the United States, Canada and Brazil — in 2011 and 2012, according to International Monetary Fund data, making the country more attractive to fortune seekers worldwide.
The new arrivals range in class from executives to laborers; Mexican officials said Friday that residency requests had grown by 10 percent since November, when a new law meant to streamline the process took effect. And they are coming from nearly everywhere.
Guillaume Pace saw his native France wilting economically, so with his new degree in finance, he moved to Mexico City.
Lee Hwan-hee made the same move from South Korea for an internship, while Spanish filmmakers, Japanese automotive executives and entrepreneurs from the United States and Latin America arrive practically daily — pursuing dreams, living well and frequently succeeding.
“There is this energy here, this feeling that anything can happen,” said Lesley Téllez, a Californian whose three-year-old business running culinary tours served hundreds of clients here last year. “It’s hard to find that in the U.S.”
The shift with Mexico’s northern neighbor is especially stark. Americans now make up more than three-quarters of Mexico’s roughly one million documented foreigners, up from around two-thirds in 2000, leading to a historic milestone: more Americans have been added to the population of Mexico over the past few years than Mexicans have been added to the population of the United States, according to government data in both nations.
Mexican migration to the United States has reached an equilibrium, with about as many Mexicans moving north from 2005 to 2010 as those returning south. The number of Americans legally living and working in Mexico grew to more than 70,000 in 2012 from 60,000 in 2009, a number that does not include many students and retirees, those on tourist visas or the roughly 350,000 American children who have arrived since 2005 with their Mexican parents. . (http://www.nytimes.com/2013/09/22/world/americas/for-migrants-new-land-of-opportunity-is-mexico.html?hp&_r=0#commentsContainer)
“Mexico is changing; all the numbers point in that direction,” said Ernesto Rodríguez Chávez, the former director of migration policy at Mexico’s Interior Ministry. He added: “There’s been an opening to the world in every way — culturally, socially and economically.”

More at : http://www.nytimes.com/2013/09/22/world/americas/for-migrants-new-land-of-opportunity-is-mexico.html?hp&_r=0

Dan McCosh
09-22-2013, 10:59 AM
Curious as to why this is a surprise.

Reynard38
09-22-2013, 11:15 AM
Wonder how many Americans entered Mexico illegally?
Having driven from Laredo to Chetamul and back in 1997 I have no desire to return to Mexico. In places it's a beautiful country, with for the most part nice locals. However the cities are dirty, dangerous are very overpopulated. Most of the towns you can smell before arriving if you are downwind due to the inadequate sewage treatment.
Nobody seems to bother putting their trash in a receptacle. They just throw it on the side off the road.
I'd add in the corrupt government, but people in glass houses...

George Jung
09-22-2013, 11:20 AM
Curious as to why this is a surprise. I had not read anything along these lines before; have you? The 'reached equilibrium' of Hispanics leaving/entering the USA was news to me, as well. And I'd never heard of Europeans or Asians migrating to Mexico. So I'm curious why you think this was predictable, or a known.

Dan McCosh
09-22-2013, 11:29 AM
I had not read anything along these lines before; have you? The 'reached equilibrium' of Hispanics leaving/entering the USA was news to me, as well. And I'd never heard of Europeans or Asians migrating to Mexico. So I'm curious why you think this was predictable, or a known. Actually, it is not part of the view of the world as seen though the eye of the American media. I think I have mentioned my son lives and works as an immigrant in Mexico City, and has for some 20 years. I tour the industrial facilities there, and note the dozen or so engineering schools that have opened up in the last few years. I once looked up in Mexico City last year and counted about a dozen high-rise buildings going up within view. Mexican corporations are global leaders in several areas. FWIW, the murder rate per capita in Mexico City is 2/3s that of Atlanta. It is Eurocentric, however, which means lots of businessmen, etc., come from Europe, or other countries in South America, with an illegal stream from central America. It is the third-richest country in the Western Hemisphere. American myopia is legendary. FWIW, I had dinner last week with a table full of correspondents visiting California from Borneo. Now that's a country I didn't know was booming.

Gerarddm
09-22-2013, 12:07 PM
Until they finally get the narco issue under control, I'm not interested.

Dan McCosh
09-22-2013, 03:37 PM
Until they finally get the narco issue under control, I'm not interested. Where is it under control?

Old Dryfoot
09-22-2013, 03:50 PM
Where is it under control?

Pretty much anywhere you don't have armed cartels rivaling the nations law enforcement agencies conducting open war in the streets.

I'm just guessing though...

Dan McCosh
09-22-2013, 03:53 PM
Pretty much anywhere you don't have armed cartels rivaling the nations law enforcement agencies conducting open war in the streets.

I'm just guessing though... That would be Canada.

Old Dryfoot
09-22-2013, 04:09 PM
That would be Canada.

...and the US, the UK, Germany, Japan, Italy, Spain, Holland, France, Belgium, Portugal, Norway, Sweden, Finland, and a whole lot more. After the collapse of the Colombian cartels the situation in Mexico has rapidly deteriorated. It's estimated that between 60,000 and 100,000 casualties can be directly attributed to the power struggle in Mexico. The status quo in the rest of the world does not even come close to comparing to what is going on there.

This is not to say other nations do not have problems with drugs and organized crime, but to equate any country to Mexico in this regard is pure folly.

BrianW
09-22-2013, 04:31 PM
Sorry Dan, you'll have to include me in the 'I didn't know' group too. ;)

But it's good news! As Mexico succeeds, hopefully it will help it's neighbors too.

As for the 'equilibrium' in Hispanic immigration between the US and Mexico, I wonder about the education levels of each group. Is the US losing a more educated person, and receiving a laborer in return?

skuthorp
09-22-2013, 04:33 PM
Hmm, if the immigration flow is reversed that fence may be handy to the Mexicans as well.:d

Dan McCosh
09-22-2013, 04:35 PM
...and the US, the UK, Germany, Japan, Italy, Spain, Holland, France, Belgium, Portugal, Norway, Sweden, Finland, and a whole lot more. After the collapse of the Colombian cartels the situation in Mexico has rapidly deteriorated. It's estimated that between 60,000 and 100,000 casualties can be directly attributed to the power struggle in Mexico. The status quo in the rest of the world does not even come close to comparing to what is going on there.

This is not to say other nations do not have problems with drugs and organized crime, but to equate any country to Mexico in this regard is pure folly. I doubt you live in a city with a violent crime rate twice Mexico City (albeit twice as safe as Ciudad Juarez), which is a couple of city blocks from here. The current drug struggle in Brazil is worse than Mexico, and much of the landscape in Central and South America likewise is worse. It's another example of the tendency to ignore what doesn't seem to directly affect you.

BrianW
09-22-2013, 04:39 PM
Hmm, if the immigration flow is reversed that fence may be handy to the Mexicans as well.:d

Nice. ;)

But now that you mention it, I wonder if the equal migration includes illegal migrants?

I'm thinking not.

Dan McCosh
09-22-2013, 04:42 PM
Sorry Dan, you'll have to include me in the 'I didn't know' group too. ;)

But it's good news! As Mexico succeeds, hopefully it will help it's neighbors too.

As for the 'equilibrium' in Hispanic immigration between the US and Mexico, I wonder about the education levels of each group. Is the US losing a more educated person, and receiving a laborer in return? Mexico is like most of the so-called "developing world" in attracting adventurous young people, often with specialized skills. The U.S. likewise attracts young Mexican professionals, looking for opportunities. Most of the time when I fly to Mexico, the plane is filled with skilled technicians from the U.S., a kind of migrant workforce of its own. On the side is the usual cliche of the illegal running across the border. There alway has been a constant ebb and flow of these people, who move from job to job either in Mexico or to the U.S. These have tended to head south again either because times turned bad in the U.S., or they made their "fortune" and want to go home.

Old Dryfoot
09-22-2013, 05:09 PM
I doubt you live in a city with a violent crime rate twice Mexico City (albeit twice as safe as Ciudad Juarez), which is a couple of city blocks from here. The current drug struggle in Brazil is worse than Mexico, and much of the landscape in Central and South America likewise is worse.

The situation in Brazil is bad, there is no denying that. However what is happening in Brazil is a struggle for control of a local market, and the police and military are making progress in disbanding the gangs, the same cannot be said in Mexico. Dollar for dollar the Mexican trade dwarfs what goes on Brazil.


It's another example of the tendency to ignore what doesn't seem to directly affect you.

Really? How so?

Dan McCosh
09-22-2013, 05:20 PM
Really? How so? This wasn't meant to be personal, only a comment that the scale and level of violence in the global drug trade tends to be ignored on the grounds that it only "them" killing each other. There is a weird comfort to think that struggles against criminal violence is "them" rather than "us". Just guessing about drug economics, but since the markup seems to compound as it goes up the distribution chain, I would assume the big money remains in the U.S.

Old Dryfoot
09-22-2013, 05:24 PM
This wasn't meant to be personal, only a comment that the scale and level of violence in the global drug trade tends to be ignored on the grounds that it only "them" killing each other. There is a weird comfort to think that struggles against criminal violence is "them" rather than "us". Just guessing about drug economics, but since the markup seems to compound as it goes up the distribution chain, I would assume the big money remains in the U.S.

Fair enough.

Whatever the situation, regarding the OP, good for Mexico! What is good for them can only mean that it's good for us. It's a wonderful country and I haven't spent nearly enough time there.