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Paul Pless
08-29-2013, 06:52 PM
Sustainability?

delecta
08-29-2013, 06:56 PM
Never. Why would you?

John of Phoenix
08-29-2013, 07:00 PM
I can't of anything I've eaten that's on the endangered list but I'm still gonna say, no.

Glen Longino
08-29-2013, 07:03 PM
I make food choices based on My sustainability.

Breakaway
08-29-2013, 07:05 PM
No. I eat what I like.

What type food are you thinking of? The only food with a "sustainable" issue attached that I can think of is swordfish, which I don't buy ( I prefer to kill my own).

Kevin

Paul Pless
08-29-2013, 07:07 PM
I'm thinking mostly of seafood.

Paul Pless
08-29-2013, 07:08 PM
Cod, tunas, some shrimps.

AnalogKid
08-29-2013, 07:10 PM
Sort of.

Always try to avoid palm oil

Limit the amount of meals with meat (only 1 this week)

Try to restrict food miles (I'll by Australian fruit and veges when there's no NZ grown available, but I'll do without rather than buy US citrus or grapes for example).

Also there's an ethical element, free range eggs, chicken and pork only.

Paul Pless
08-29-2013, 07:10 PM
but there are sustainability issues surrounding any large scale production of meat products.

Old Dryfoot
08-29-2013, 07:12 PM
Since leaving the cooking business about 15 years ago the only seafood I eat, aside from canned tuna, is the stuff I catch.

EDIT: The tuna is albacore and it only amounts to a dozen or so tins a year, mercury is an issue that was not paramount back in the day.

AnalogKid
08-29-2013, 07:13 PM
Ahh, seafood.

One of NZ's largest seafood suppliers has poor records in terms of sustainable fishing practices and workers rights, and we avoid them like the plague.

Line caught tuna only, and I try not to at all, but my partner and my boy seem to find it harder to give up.

ccmanuals
08-29-2013, 07:17 PM
I have completely cut out diet coke. Does that count?

John Smith
08-29-2013, 07:19 PM
I always wonder where the fish have been swimming. I seem to recall mercury being a problem some years back.

C. Ross
08-29-2013, 07:32 PM
Twenty-two years ago I read the scientific reports that were clear about the devastation of the earth because of cultivation of mammal protein. Massive factory farms were cratering fresh water supplies and delivering animals to slaughter under inhumane and unhealthy conditions. I felt healthier when I ate less meat. I opted out. Haven't had beef, pork, lamb, veal, mutton, bison or any other meat mammal since.

I eat poultry rarely. I always pick fish based on sustainability. Vegetable protein is cheap, plentiful and tasty.

I make up for it by being a carbon whore. I fly 150,000 miles a year, and I like big engines in my cars and boat. So I figure I'm about even.

elf
08-29-2013, 08:41 PM
I'm a carnivore. Almost all my meat choices are based on price.

The only higher level fish I eat are those I catch - bluefish and, if we're lucky, some striped bass.

Generally I don't buy any produce which is not local except lettuce and sweet peppers. I only eat tomatoes when they've been grown in my garden or locally. Don't eat apples out of season and then mostly patronize local stands, don't like any pears but Bartlett which are local. Local doesn't mean sustainable, however.

This month I have been purchasing half bushels of tomatoes and peaches to can - the tomatoes as sauce, the peaches with a half-light syrup. The tomatoes are probably grown without poisons, but undoubtedly the peaches are sprayed, probably with something it would be nicer to avoid.

A friend of mine keeps chickens, so I haven't bought eggs in the market for years.

I don't buy any conventional chocolate but my favorite brand is not grown sustainably. However, it's very expensive, so probably not as bad as something like Hershey's, for instance. Recently I have been spending more money for responsibly grown coffee beans.

Chip-skiff
08-29-2013, 09:38 PM
Constantly.

We garden, forage, and hunt, without being pissants about it.

Rarely, we go to a city and enjoy amazing meals, cooked by masters, with no guilt whatsoever.

Chip-skiff
08-29-2013, 10:09 PM
Being mates with a number of Alaska trollers, I avoid farmed fish in favor of wild-caught ones.

Phil Y
08-29-2013, 10:14 PM
Sort of.

Always try to avoid palm oil

Limit the amount of meals with meat (only 1 this week)

Try to restrict food miles (I'll by Australian fruit and veges when there's no NZ grown available, but I'll do without rather than buy US citrus or grapes for example).

Also there's an ethical element, free range eggs, chicken and pork only.

There is a standard and a movement to produce sustainable palm oil, no dead orangutans, no destruction of rain forest etc, but its hard to differentiate the product at the consumer level.

Waddie
08-29-2013, 10:35 PM
How is anything "sustainable" with over 7 billion people on the planet, and a quarter of a million more added every day?

regards,
Waddie

LeeG
08-29-2013, 10:55 PM
I make food choices based on nutrition, taste and seduction

Oysterhouse
08-29-2013, 10:57 PM
Sustainability?

Not quite sure what that phrase means. Is it like "environmental, organic, healthy, green, natural"---which are just marketing phrases that don't have any real meaning?

I avoid farm raised seafood--It isn't "sustainable" without the farmer, so I consider farm raised seafood as a managed food source, not a sustainable one.

I look for "wild caught" seafood (yep, another marketing phrase), wild seafood sources are completely sustainable, as long as the stocks are not over fished, again making them a managed food source.

Both sources of seafood suffer from the ill effects of the congruence of money, marketing and politics.

I still feel better supporting the fisherman, rather than the fish-farmer.

skuthorp
08-30-2013, 02:05 AM
How is anything "sustainable" with over 7 billion people on the planet, and a quarter of a million more added every day?

regards,
Waddie

Here here. That said we grow about 80% of the vegetables we eat and swap with a neighbour for eggs and the occasional chook. My new henhouse (Cluckingham Palace) is almost complete.

Figment
08-30-2013, 07:35 AM
Absolutely.

I only eat shrimp when I'm a guest in another home.
The only swordfish I've eaten in the last 5 years has been harpooned.
Some "farmed" fish I'm ok with, some practices I'm not. With salmon I generally steer toward wild-caught mostly on basis of taste and higher omega-3 content.
Can't remember the last time I ate tuna.

Gerarddm
08-30-2013, 10:17 AM
I don't eat veal.

I have almost completely eliminated seafood because of mercury contamination and now Fukushima.

My food choices basically refrain from eating GMOs and phytotoxins.

elf
08-30-2013, 05:41 PM
Second batch of tomato sauce this year:

https://sphotos-a-atl.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash3/q71/1149001_10151829152164917_48629115_n.jpg

This kettle made 4+ quarts. Working on the next kettle now.

Paul Pless
08-30-2013, 05:42 PM
I don't eat veal.

I have almost completely eliminated seafood because of mercury contamination and now Fukushima.

My food choices basically refrain from eating GMOs and phytotoxins.none of these decisions are based on sustainability. . .

Paul Pless
08-30-2013, 05:44 PM
Generally I don't buy any produce which is not local except lettuce and sweet peppers. I only eat tomatoes when they've been grown in my garden or locally. Don't eat apples out of season and then mostly patronize local stands, don't like any pears but Bartlett which are local. Local doesn't mean sustainable, however.Absolutely true, but eliminating or minimizing transport and storage costs can go a long ways towards making a product choice a sustainable choice. . .

PeterSibley
08-30-2013, 05:48 PM
Sustainability ? A much overused and probably meaningless idea.

Is modern western farming sustainable ? .... without oil ? no
Fisheries , apparently not.
I'd suggest that we are not "sustainable'' as a culture, particularly when it comes to food production.

skuthorp
08-30-2013, 05:52 PM
We've been withdrawing from the Fossil Bank for about 400 years, and increasing exponetially. Some accounts are overdrawn, some are actually empty, like cod, and herring. Eventually it will go bankrupt, and there'll be no Mars based bailout.

elf
08-30-2013, 07:02 PM
Absolutely true, but eliminating or minimizing transport and storage costs can go a long ways towards making a product choice a sustainable choice. . .
Nah! Fertilizing with nitrogen based fertilizers, using Round-up to control weeds, or worse, Round-up-ready seeds, spraying fruit trees with the wrong kinds of sprays or at the wrong time - none of these practices is part of a truely sustainable system.

One year the fruit grower from whom I get my peaches and apples attempted to control poison ivy in his cranberry bogs by the most environmentally effective method he could think of (short of hiring an army of laborers to pull every piece all summer long). His process? He used a long tongs with tiny sponges on the inside of it, dipped the sponges in round-up and rode thru his bogs on his tractor carefully grasping each poison ivy plant between the tongs and wiping it with the Round-up. It killed the poison ivy and not the cranberries. But he didn't have as much time to attend to his apple and peach trees, and his tractor used a lot of fuel and some of his vines got damaged by it. And the next year, after the birds had eaten all the poison ivy berries for miles around, he was back where he started.

So it's a trade-off but large scale agriculture doesn't trade real well.

Portland
08-30-2013, 07:26 PM
We eat mostly what we grow , or catch , or trade between neighbouring farms.
Anything I buy must be Australian , organic and locally grown , if possible.
If its not available , I go without.
We have collected and used water from our house and sheds roofs too for many years , no mains system.
Rob J.