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Rum_Pirate
08-06-2013, 07:03 PM
A friend put this to me.

You know all about yourself.
You know quite a lot about your parents.
How much do you know of your great grandparents, or their parents?
Do you know what school they went too, what job they did, any experiences that they had, etc?

Why not start jotting down the details that you know about your relatives for your children and their children?

Glen Longino
08-06-2013, 08:07 PM
Not much point in it, IMO!
Nobody can uncover his heritage beyond a few scant generations. Nobody can trace his genealogy back even 10,000 years out of the millions of years of his heritage.
Genealogy study is more important to some than to others, and can be an interesting hobby, I suppose.

pumpkin
08-06-2013, 08:39 PM
Before she died, my grandma told me a story about when she was 2 and her mother gave her a rag doll. I've been trying to include things like this and personal experiences into the books I write. I named one of the boats after my late mother-in-law. One of my daughters read the books and commented that she knows me better now than she thought she ever would.

As far as my family history, we have family trees with that kind of history going back hundreds of years.

S.V. Airlie
08-06-2013, 08:44 PM
A friend put this to me.

You know all about yourself.
You know quite a lot about your parents.
How much do you know of your great grandparents, or their parents?
Do you know what school they went too, what job they did, any experiences that they had, etc?

Why not start jotting down the details that you know about your relatives for your children and their children?I know about my ancesters, most of them, quite well depending on if you include American,English, Canadian lines..A bit weak on the Russians most who died during the revolution and records are a bi spotty. Same with the Scottish...And I have jotted down details already.

Ian McColgin
08-06-2013, 08:51 PM
Or have a relative convert to LDS.

S.V. Airlie
08-06-2013, 08:53 PM
Or have a relative convert to LDS.You don't have to convert anyone Ian.

paulf
08-06-2013, 09:26 PM
I am 99.9% Irish, From O,Neill, O'Connor, Divine and Farley.

My daughter does research and finds that .1% who are French Canadians and there is tons of info back to Napoleon! Hell I'm related to Celion Dion, Records were kept for French settlers through the church. Not so much for Irish poor moving to Chicago in 1840-1860.

CWSmith
08-06-2013, 09:31 PM
Not much point in it, IMO!
Nobody can uncover his heritage beyond a few scant generations. Nobody can trace his genealogy back even 10,000 years out of the millions of years of his heritage.
Genealogy study is more important to some than to others, and can be an interesting hobby, I suppose.

There is short-, intermediate- and long-term. Intermediate is the hard bit. Few people trace further back than 6 or 7 generations. For long-term, you can send your DNA to any of several places that will tell you where your people come from and they will also tell you what fraction Neanderthal you are. We are all part Neanderthal unless you come from Africa. Cool.

S.V. Airlie
08-06-2013, 09:34 PM
I'm good for 11 generations in the colonies/states..Some are known. Again, Russia is a problem. No proof for what I have. Ya need proof.

Full Tilt
08-06-2013, 09:42 PM
Traced my mums side back to Metallurgist at Harland and Wolf. Made bronze fittings for 'Titanic'.

Dad's side were sailmakers in Cardiff for hundreds of years. Married to the daughter of a gunsmith.

Reached some distant relatives in Wales. They're 100% Neanderthals.

Ancestry.com was useful.

Mike

Waddie
08-06-2013, 09:47 PM
Most of the ancestors I know about were outlaws and crooks. But then again, they're always the more interesting ones, and more likely to be remembered. Back down the line one came to America to avoid service in the Prussian army. The rest didn't come over until the late 1890's or in the early 20th century. All were unskilled laborers or farmers in the old country, which for my people was Germany. Once here most of them made good, except for one uncle of mine who did time in Alcatraz. He robbed a few banks in the 30's, but didn't everyone back then? He eventually wrote a book about his time there, and was featured in a documentary. So I guess he made good after all. Now most of us descendants are engineers and/or teachers.

regards,
Waddie

Ian McColgin
08-06-2013, 09:55 PM
For those who don't know, LDS (Mormons) believe in posthumous conversion and there's a special push on converting one's dead ancestors who had not been Mormons in life. To 'gentiles' this may seem a bit strange, but it does lead the Mormons to have about the best geneological resourses and they don't waste time proving that you're related to King David, whether the Scottish David of the Hebrew David.

CWSmith
08-06-2013, 10:03 PM
For those who don't know, LDS (Mormons) believe in posthumous conversion...

Since we're talking about it, I have never understood this. Many of us believe in salvation for all. Some still like to make their mental lists of who is saved and who is not. But to believe in condemnation to hell, then salvation through the act of another, is a tough theological nut to crack.

Full Tilt
08-06-2013, 10:13 PM
Faith my son, Faith.

Mike:)

Waddie
08-06-2013, 10:18 PM
Since we're talking about it, I have never understood this. Many of us believe in salvation for all. Some still like to make their mental lists of who is saved and who is not. But to believe in condemnation to hell, then salvation through the act of another, is a tough theological nut to crack.

I've become a believer on many occasions; usually during an "oh sh!t" situation. I hope He doesn't hold me to all those promises made on the spur of the moment....... :)

regards,
Waddie

MiddleAgesMan
08-06-2013, 10:19 PM
I know a lot about my grandparents but very little beyond them. I'm equally Welsh, Swedish, Dutch, and English.

One of my cousins traced our Welsh roots back several hundred years and learned that General Oglethorpe (founder of Savannah) was married to one of our female ancestors.

leikec
08-06-2013, 11:40 PM
Most of my maternal and paternal ancestors were loyalists who ended up in Hastings county in Ontario after the revolution.

The Lavigne and Tacy (Tacet) ancestors came from France and settled in the area around what is now Montreal.


The Kennedy's came from Ireland and lived for a few generations in New York and Boston before heading south and west to Virginia and Ohio.


The Back (Bach) and Hunneman (Honeyman) lines came from Lorraine, France in the mid 1800s. They eventually ended up in Utica and Rochester, New York, and Philadelphia, PA.


The rest, the Seeley, Reid, Curry, Brooks, Nesbitt, and the Wright families all ended up in Hastings county at the end of the 18th century due to the revolution.


Family's intermarried. My great grandmother Seeley's mother was a Reid, and her paternal grandmother was also a Reid. I guess I'm lucky to have a normal number of toes....:D


Jeff C

skuthorp
08-07-2013, 07:06 AM
As an extended family we know quite a bit back to about 1650's, but for us with no kids then it's not relevant.
OTOH family health histories can be very important indeed.

skuthorp
08-07-2013, 07:23 AM
My family were pirates in the 18th century, it's been downhill for the family ever since.
One line of ours were generations of Royal Marines bogdog. We may have had contact:cool:

Rich Jones
08-07-2013, 07:35 AM
My father's family came to the U.S. well before the Revolution. His mother had an extensive family tree done in order to be eligible for the Daughters of the American Revolution (D.A.R.). To be a member, you had to have someone who fought in the Revolution. Our ancestor was an officer in our young navy. I believe there's a similar a organization for men, The Sons of Liberty, that I would be eligible for. This tree traces the family back to the 1400's in Europe.
My Mom turns 89 today and is in great health both physically and mentally. I should start pumping her for stories of her grandparents, etc. Her family tree beyond her grandparents is a total mystery. Mixed together, I'm of Welsh/German ancestry.

John Smith
08-07-2013, 08:06 AM
It only takes one generation to lose interest and throw away all the family research.

This is what's always puzzled me about cemeteries. All those graves with no one alive that knew the people buried in them.

We do live in an age where we have photos of the entire family. Probably a good idea to write who's in the photo on the back of the photo.

Truth be told, I really doubt my great grandkids, if I ever have any, will give a damn about me.

Rum_Pirate
08-07-2013, 08:53 AM
This is what's always puzzled me about cemeteries. All those graves with no one alive that knew the people buried in them.

We do live in an age where we have photos of the entire family. Probably a good idea to write who's in the photo on the back of the photo.

Truth be told, I really doubt my great grandkids, if I ever have any, will give a damn about me. + 1




This is what's always puzzled me about cemeteries. All those graves with no one alive that knew the people buried in them.

We do live in an age where we have photos of the entire family. Probably a good idea to write who's in the photo on the back of the photo.

Truth be told, I really doubt my great grandkids, if I ever have any, will give a damn about me. It depends on how you bring up your children and they bring up your grandchildren.

PS They might think of you more if you leave them lots of money.

CWSmith
08-07-2013, 09:10 AM
This is what's always puzzled me about cemeteries. All those graves with no one alive that knew the people buried in them.


That's why I want to be cremated. The thought of denying kids what could be a field to play on just so I can rot in the ground seems a long-time selfish. That's not a reflection on past generations. Views change. It's just where I am now. Plus, I'd rather my wife keep the money and do it cheap.

Rum_Pirate
08-07-2013, 09:28 AM
That's why I want to be cremated. The thought of denying kids what could be a field to play on just so I can rot in the ground seems a long-time selfish. That's not a reflection on past generations. Views change. It's just where I am now. Plus, I'd rather my wife keep the money and do it cheap.

Have you considered this?

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S.V. Airlie
08-07-2013, 01:05 PM
My father's family came to the U.S. well before the Revolution. His mother had an extensive family tree done in order to be eligible for the Daughters of the American Revolution (D.A.R.). To be a member, you had to have someone who fought in the Revolution. Our ancestor was an officer in our young navy. I believe there's a similar a organization for men, The Sons of Liberty, that I would be eligible for. This tree traces the family back to the 1400's in Europe.
My Mom turns 89 today and is in great health both physically and mentally. I should start pumping her for stories of her grandparents, etc. Her family tree beyond her grandparents is a total mystery. Mixed together, I'm of Welsh/German ancestry.Rich..yes those who FOUGHT in the Revolution but not limited to. Mine did not fight but, signed a few papers which initially made him an outlaw but, after 1783, a hero!!!!!!

Rich Jones
08-08-2013, 07:44 AM
Rich..yes those who FOUGHT in the Revolution but not limited to. Mine did not fight but, signed a few papers which initially made him an outlaw but, after 1783, a hero!!!!!!

Mine were Captain Isaac Conklin, 6th Regt., Duchess County N.Y. Militia., 2nd Lt. Isaac Van Cleef, Duchess County N.Y. Militia(son-in -law of Capt. Conklin) and Captain William Mercier (Navy). Supposedly captured six prizes while in command of the sloop Montgomery.
Also had a guy named Teunis Von Beuchoten who signed "Articles of Association" (whatever they were) in 1775.
My knowledge of who is eligible was just passed down mouth-to-mouth, I never researched it myself.
So, are we related??:d

S.V. Airlie
08-08-2013, 08:14 AM
Mine were Captain Isaac Conklin, 6th Regt., Duchess County N.Y. Militia., 2nd Lt. Isaac Van Cleef, Duchess County N.Y. Militia(son-in -law of Capt. Conklin) and Captain William Mercier (Navy). Supposedly captured six prizes while in command of the sloop Montgomery.
Also had a guy named Teunis Von Beuchoten who signed "Articles of Association" (whatever they were) in 1775.
My knowledge of who is eligible was just passed down mouth-to-mouth, I never researched it myself.
So, are we related??:dNot that I know of.

skipper68
08-08-2013, 08:31 AM
Our family tree is full of nuts.
From my Great Grandmother divorcing her husband in the 1800's, (Oh the Shame!) to my Dad being arrested for riding in a laundry dryer...
My one Grandma was a tiny woman with a huge goiter-who would steal everyone garbage from the curb, and arrange it into art, in the corner of the kitchen!
Grandpa retired and never left the cellar again...
Grandma found a gallon of pink paint and painted EVERYTHING pink, including my Patent Leather Mary Jane shoes-to all the glass window panes.

I'm sure no one here is surprised.:D
We did lose Pixley Falls to the State, and it is a state park now.http://www.nysparks.com/parks/32/details.aspx
People should pay their taxes, I guess. ;)

BTW, I think I'm related to Jamie. :D:D

S/V Laura Ellen
08-08-2013, 08:56 AM
One good thing about having an uncommon last name is that it is easy to trace.
If I find someone with the same last name, I can be almost certain that we're related.

bob winter
08-08-2013, 02:42 PM
I am reasonably sure that I have the Winter family traced fairly accurately back to a Christopher Winter who fought in Butler's Rangers during the revolution. He was born in Uxbridge Mass and died in Northumberland Township, Ontario.

The family came to America long before the revolution.

S.V. Airlie
08-08-2013, 02:45 PM
So no winter of discontent there Bob.:)

S.V. Airlie
08-08-2013, 02:47 PM
I have enjoyed doing a bit of work on my genealogy. Not for myself but, for my nephews and Great Nephews and neices who are too young now but may appreciate where they came later in life.

gilberj
08-08-2013, 03:00 PM
Most of the strings of our family can be reliably traced back to 1700, with a healthy handfull (including the Gilberts) back to before 1600. We can trace back one string (Kirkpatricks) to before 1200. The first direct ancestor to come over was in 1620 with the Mayflower.... John Alden, the last direct ancestor to come over to this side of the pond did so in 1841 (Frances D Gilbert and wife Elizabeth, later he went to the California gold rush). During the 1700's the Gilberts were principal characters in developing the British canals with the Duke of Bridgewater.

S.V. Airlie
08-08-2013, 03:03 PM
I think I'm related to Jamie. :D:D Other than the NUT part, how do you figure.

S.V. Airlie
08-08-2013, 03:04 PM
Most of the strings of our family can be reliably traced back to 1700, with a healthy handfull (including the Gilberts) back to before 1600. We can trace back one string (Kirkpatricks) to before 1200. The first direct ancestor to come over was in 1620 with the Mayflower.... John Alden, the last direct ancestor to come over to this side of the pond did so in 1841 (Frances D Gilbert and wife Elizabeth, later he went to the California gold rush). During the 1700's the Gilberts were principal characters in developing the British canals with the Duke of Bridgewater.Now you and I are related.:)

Rich Jones
08-08-2013, 03:27 PM
Our tree goes back as far as the early 1500's with some dude named Marquis de Cresse. Who knows, maybe I own a castle in France somewhere. Also had relatives who owned land in Manhatten during the early 1800's. If only I had the Deed!!

S.V. Airlie
08-08-2013, 03:42 PM
If you do, you probably owe back taxes and. I'd be veeeery quiet about it.:)

gilberj
08-08-2013, 03:43 PM
Is Winter related to Winters?

cool........

bob winter
08-08-2013, 04:20 PM
Is Winter related to Winters?

Very likely it could be, people are always calling me Winters instead of Winter. Seems to be pretty mixed up. There is also a possibility that Wintor is in the mix as well.

There are a real pile of Winter/Winters kicking around and they seem to have many different origins. Dutch, German, English, Jewish to name a few. I know there was a mess of German Winters came over in the early 1700's and they clutter everything up.

gilberj
08-08-2013, 04:52 PM
Now you and I are related.:)

Hello Cousin....:D

S.V. Airlie
08-08-2013, 05:32 PM
Hello Cousin....:DI suppose..I'm trying to think how many separate us generationally..2nd,3rd,4th,5th,6th,7th,8th,9th, cousin 1x,2x,3x,4x,5x,6x,7x,8x, etc.

I can't figure it. You may have more luck.:)

S.V. Airlie
08-08-2013, 05:48 PM
That's what I was referring to but, didn't write removed on the post above. Itb would and does get confusing in the current gen. I've got some 2nd cousins (grandfathers were brothers) and their kids are once removed I think..could be wrong.

Glen Longino
08-08-2013, 05:56 PM
Hello Cousin....:D

Dangit, you beat me to it!
I was fixin' to scare the hell of Jamie!:)

Glen Longino
08-08-2013, 06:00 PM
As I understand it, your parent's first cousins are your second cousins.
Your first cousin's children are your first cousins once removed...and so on.

The Bigfella
08-08-2013, 06:16 PM
If it isn't a physical record (papers, photos, etc) it can get difficult to follow things through after a generation or two. One of the nicest pieces still around in our family is the margin annotations made in a biography of the Bronte family by my great grandmother, Catherine Bronte. She was born in 1863 and her comments related to people such as Charlotte's husband, Arthur Bell Nicholls.... of whom she wasn't particularly fond.

Breakaway
08-08-2013, 09:04 PM
I know some stuff. My dad's people arrived in NYC from Kerry, Ireland 1851. My Mom's folks from Cork a few years prior. My great-great-great-great grandpa was a fishing tackle shop owner on South Street, in NYC. Most other forebears are easy to guess: sandhogs,firemen, cops and longshoremen. We've a few gangsters, barmen and my great grandad on mom's side who drove a horse-drawn beer wagon. My parents generation ( born in the 30's 40's) were the first to own property. My generation ( born in the 60's) was the first to attend college.

There is much more; all very specific and personal. All a verbal history though, except for a few curled photos and faded newspaper clippings, and various "versions" of the same story do circulate. Writing it down would be a good idea.

Kevin

gilberj
08-08-2013, 11:09 PM
S/V Airlie......I am presuming the ancestors we share is John Alden and Priscilla Mullins??

coelacanth2
08-08-2013, 11:50 PM
Mostly Scots/Irish here - the family names on dad's side are Scottish but the people were in Ireland before they emigrated/skipped out. That part of tha family hailed from the west coast of ireland. The family farm backed up on the ocean, so they fished as well as farmed. He mentioned that a lot of them slid out of Scotland just ahead of the Redcoats. Grace O'Malley on that side, among others. Mom's side of the family were German out of Heidelberg by way of Nova Scotia and a bunch of booze running Irishmen from Massachusetts. I still have a bloodstone signet ring with a German crest on it that supposedly goes back to Heidelberg. Still and all, the family name there was Mehlman ( essentially mill-man or miller) so if they were nobility it was probably pretty minor.
Funny thing - dads side of the family did a bit of smuggling, too, but it wasn't booze.

S.V. Airlie
08-09-2013, 07:41 AM
S/V Airlie......I am presuming the ancestors we share is John Alden and Priscilla Mullins??Yes..through their daughter Ruth.

skipper68
08-09-2013, 08:47 AM
I think I'm related to Jamie. :D:D Other than the NUT part, how do you figure.
My Maiden name is your last name.
Remember when I called you in the hospital? I was surprised they were the same. :)

gilberj
08-09-2013, 09:44 AM
Yes..through their daughter Ruth.

I believe Ruth Alden and John Bass are my ancestors as well. I do not have the information handy but they soon connected with one of the Thayers which leeds to me....

S.V. Airlie
08-09-2013, 12:24 PM
From Ruth/Bass a different line all together. Check with the MA. Historical Soc. They have the first 5/6 generations confirmed...Might be a few more.

gilberj
08-09-2013, 01:39 PM
From Ruth/Bass a different line all together. Check with the MA. Historical Soc. They have the first 5/6 generations confirmed...Might be a few more.

I have not dug out my records, (They are I believe complete), but a brief internet search shows Ruth Alden/John Bass had 8 Children: John Bass Jr, Samuel Bass (http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=13499170), Ruth Bass Webb, Joseph Bass, Hannah Bass Adams (http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=26678903), Mary Bass Webb Copeland Spear, Sarah Bass Thayer (http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=16583849), and Philip Bass.

Sarah Bass married Ephriam Thayer.......As I said, I don't have my records handy but can trace the names through to the present, from them, through the Thayers till the mid 1800's. I'll try to find the records.

S.V. Airlie
08-09-2013, 01:46 PM
My Maiden name is your last name.
Remember when I called you in the hospital? I was surprised they were the same. :)The Johnstons came to this country ( Cooperstown primarily) in the 1840's. My line ( local Cemetary includes those in my line I'd expect to see. My grandfather (one brother) My father only child. My grandfather's brother Douglas, two girls...GGrandfather James A. M. Johnston, only one son and one brother who only had one son Willie (died young. Not sure where you fit in.
I don't remember you calling me. Probably did though.

S.V. Airlie
08-09-2013, 01:50 PM
Either have I. At least not lately...Ruth Bass must have married Jos. Adams.....I know my line is direct though...You have to remember that there must be more than 10,000 desc. of the Mayflower crowd.:)

bob winter
08-09-2013, 02:56 PM
I am still working on it but there is a chance I am descended from a John Winter who was running a fishing operation in Maine for some guy named Trelawney in the 1630's. Arrived in America sometime before that but I am not sure when exactly. This does not totally agree with family tradition that says we came originally to New Holland in the early 1600's. I have to do a lot more work, if I ever get the time. What exactly was New Holland, anyway?

Doing this stuff via the internet is a very frustrating experience. One problem is that the Winter family, in its various incarnations, is very short on imagination when it comes to first names.

S.V. Airlie
08-09-2013, 03:25 PM
Have fun because it can be fun but, if you really get into it, it can also be expensive Bob!:)

Breakaway
08-09-2013, 03:40 PM
What exactly was New Holland, anyway?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Holland

S.V. Airlie
08-09-2013, 03:44 PM
NEW YORK CITY I suspect. The English got it in 1660.

bob winter
08-09-2013, 03:44 PM
I kind of had the expensive part figured out. I got sucked into this by a question from my son about his great grandfather. I didn't know the answer off the top of my head and things have built up from there.

As I said earlier, I have everything pretty well nailed down back to Christopher Winter but to go further back, I will need to access some sort of US records and that won't be either easy or cheap. First, I will take a trip one of these days to Haldimand in Northumberland County in Ontario and see what I can see by way of actual records. These internet extracts are not that satisfying.

Things are somewhat complicated by the fact that there were Winters fighting in the Royal New York Regiment as well as Christopher in the Butler's Rangers. The Winters in the RNYR were of German extraction. Guess what? They ended up in Haldimand as well. Record keeping there was not good. I have never seen a census list with no apparent order to it before.

S.V. Airlie
08-09-2013, 06:45 PM
Some of the commercial genealogical websites have very erroneous information. They don't actually verify material they post. If I accepted all the garbage on places like Ancestry.com I'd be related to every notable person with my surname that ever existed, it just ain't true. A number of these websites have individuals who are paid to post any information they can find about specific surnames they create linkages where there are none. As an example my paternal ancestor immigrated from Ireland with his whole family including a daughter and his sister. The daughter and sister shared the same given name. The chaos on commercial sites due to that shared name are amusing but wrong. I did all my work the old fashioned way via ma legs.Agreed. Why I suspect using some of the connections are not considered as proof of that connection by genealogists or historians. I am or have used The MA Historical Soc. for the proof I've needed and their data is as good as it gets.That organization has contacted me looking for family portraits but I could not help being a different (direct) line..Contacted a 5th 6th ot 7th cousin to give him a heads up about the portraits in question and he faintly remembers his grandfather had them until 1908. Then lost!!!

John How
08-09-2013, 07:14 PM
I have traced my family to 1700's in Kent county England. I even have a hand written journal of the first boat trip from London by the two "How" brothers. They arrived in the great lakes area and then over the next year made their way to St Louis and that's is where my family stayed until my dad moved to California after WW2.

skipper68
08-09-2013, 11:27 PM
Re: Your family ?
Originally Posted by skipper68
My Maiden name is your last name.
Remember when I called you in the hospital? I was surprised they were the same.
The Johnstons came to this country ( Cooperstown primarily) in the 1840's. My line ( local Cemetary includes those in my line I'd expect to see. My grandfather (one brother) My father only child. My grandfather's brother Douglas, two girls...Grandfather James A. M. Johnston, only one son and one brother who only had one son Willie (died young. Not sure where you fit in.
I don't remember you calling me. Probably did though.I luv you Uncle Grandaddy Uncle ?? And other thingamajigs! :) YES I did call you. It was a pleasure. Your sweet as Honey.;)