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Paul Pless
07-05-2013, 10:01 AM
Its an ugly plant. Its blossoms are unattractive and often sticky and covered with ants. Its invasive and will quickly climb to the top of a tree spreading to other trees as it grows. I see no good reason for anyone to ever purposely cultivate trumpet vines.

Will I go to Hell if I were to accidentally nick with the string trimmer the trumpet vine that Honey Bunny planted?

C. Ross
07-05-2013, 10:08 AM
If Honey Bunny planted it, it is a beautiful plant with attractive blossoms, and is "hardy" not "invasive".

She may or may not come to see it as you do. If she does, by then it will be too late. You are not allowed to say "I told you so" though you can invite her - politely - to assist in its removal. Any other actions or deviations from these rules will put you in purgatory or Hell.

These are the rules of gardening for men who want to stay married. QED.

elf
07-05-2013, 10:13 AM
Hummingbirds and pruning. Just live with it.

And be glad it's not wisteria or oriental bittersweet or english ivy.

S/V Laura Ellen
07-05-2013, 10:14 AM
Will I go to Hell if I were to accidentally nick with the string trimmer the trumpet vine that Honey Bunny planted?

Luckily, Hell is just down the road. When she gets home, have a nice bottle of her favourite beverage and dinner and explain the string trimmer accident and how sorry you are for the accident. New flowers (of an acceptable variety) ready to plant would also be a nice touch. Sell your story like there's no tomorrow. She isn't going to buy any of it but she will at least be appreciative of your effort.

Arizona Bay
07-05-2013, 10:16 AM
Hummingbirds love them.

Cut them back in the fall when they're dormant, it doesn't look so drastic that way.

skipper68
07-05-2013, 10:22 AM
Umm..
Honey Bunny will be reading this. :D

I almost bought one a while back.
After reading this, I'm glad I stuck with Morning Glory's now.

S/V Laura Ellen
07-05-2013, 10:35 AM
It could be worse, it could be sweet peas.
I've been trying unsuccessfully to get rid of them for 7 years.

ahp
07-05-2013, 10:36 AM
Umm..
Honey Bunny will be reading this. :D

I almost bought one a while back.
After reading this, I'm glad I stuck with Morning Glory's now.

The traditional and proper place for trumpet vine is growing over and around that little house in your backyard with the half moon cut in the door.

skipper68
07-05-2013, 10:38 AM
The traditional and proper place for trumpet vine is growing over and around that little house in your backyard with the half moon cut in the door.
So then you read your newspaper with the spiders AND ants?! YUCK!

elf
07-05-2013, 10:42 AM
Umm..
Honey Bunny will be reading this. :D

I almost bought one a while back.
After reading this, I'm glad I stuck with Morning Glory's now.
Good god, don't spend money on one. Just go dig one from some place by the side of the road or a neighbor's yard.

Morning glories (note - no apostrophe in plurals and this is the correct spelling) are annuals, unless the local varmints manage to not eat all the seeds they make. So there is no way they can become the plague that trumpet vine or wisteria is.

skipper68
07-05-2013, 10:48 AM
Thanks elf, my spelling skills seem to be leaving more every year. :)
The seed pods do drop on them, so I just enjoy what shows up now.
My roses all drowned, and my Tiger lilies are almost 6 foot tall from all the rain.
I feel like that commercial-"My house is where plants go to die" lately.
:(

bogdog
07-05-2013, 11:10 AM
[QUOTE=elf;3838221
Morning glories (note - no apostrophe in plurals and this is the correct spelling) are annuals, unless the local varmints manage to not eat all the seeds they make. So there is no way they can become the plague that trumpet vine or wisteria is.[/QUOTE]


Don't I wish they were all annuals. There are over a thousand species and some are perennial. I purchased seven yds of shredded hardwood mulch a few years ago not knowing that a perennial morning glory was chopped up in the mulch. Just a mm of root is all it needs to survive. I'm sure as growing zone change it will continue it's northern march.

The seed pods of trumpet vine are an important food source for native finches of various species. The plants do respond well to pruning which keeps them in bounds.

elf
07-05-2013, 12:11 PM
Some interesting info here:

http://forums.gardenweb.com/forums/load/vines/msg1220010111786.html

I guess that's why I had no idea there was a perennial version. Way too far North here for it.

TomF
07-05-2013, 01:18 PM
Haven't you got at least one dog who'd "accidentally" chew the thing beyond recognition?

TomF
07-05-2013, 01:31 PM
BTW, I'm told that sometimes the wind can come up when you're battling some noxious weed with Roundup, and a small amount of over-spray can drift onto a valued ornamental plant.

It's a tragedy.

hokiefan
07-05-2013, 01:33 PM
Its an ugly plant. Its blossoms are unattractive and often sticky and covered with ants. Its invasive and will quickly climb to the top of a tree spreading to other trees as it grows. I see no good reason for anyone to ever purposely cultivate trumpet vines.

Will I go to Hell if I were to accidentally nick with the string trimmer the trumpet vine that Honey Bunny planted?


Umm..
Honey Bunny will be reading this. :D

I almost bought one a while back.
After reading this, I'm glad I stuck with Morning Glory's now.

At this point Paul, you should probably guard that plant with your very life.:d

Flying Orca
07-05-2013, 01:34 PM
Yer a bad, bad man to be putting such thoughts in Paul's innocent li'l thinker... :D

TomF
07-05-2013, 01:36 PM
Yer a bad, bad man to be putting such thoughts in Paul's innocent li'l thinker... :DHe lives in Hell. Today, I'm the devil sitting on his left shoulder. :D

Paul Pless
07-05-2013, 01:38 PM
BTW, I'm told that sometimes the wind can come up when you're battling some noxious weed with Roundup, and a small amount of over-spray can drift onto a valued ornamental plant.

It's a tragedy.It's an ill wind that blows no one any good. . .

bogdog
07-05-2013, 01:40 PM
BTW, I'm told that sometimes the wind can come up when you're battling some noxious weed with Roundup, and a small amount of over-spray can drift onto a valued ornamental plant.

It's a tragedy.I've watched that happen numerous times plus watching folks spray roundup on plants not actively growing and wondering why it didn't work. Ya really need to baby your plants, stimulate new growth...just before you have a spraying "accident."

elf
07-05-2013, 02:20 PM
Around here we don't spray. But we do paint.

P.I. Stazzer-Newt
07-05-2013, 02:22 PM
Would you like a knotweed?

bogdog
07-05-2013, 02:31 PM
Would you like a knotweed?We've already been fleeced by a few of ya'll's knotweeds

Katherine
07-05-2013, 04:33 PM
Maybe Paul needs pruning.

Arizona Bay
07-05-2013, 05:06 PM
Spraying Trumpet vine with roundup won't do nothin' but irritate it.



Maybe Paul needs pruning.

Just leave the snips on the bed table as a hint... :D

Donn
07-05-2013, 06:08 PM
Way too far North here for it.

I'd bet there's at least one variety growing wild on Cape Cod; Convolvulus arvensis, AKA Field Bindweed. It's hardy to zone 5 and grows practically anywhere.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/3/3b/Convolvulus_arvensis.jpg

skipper68
07-06-2013, 01:00 AM
I've watched that happen numerous times plus watching folks spray roundup on plants not actively growing and wondering why it didn't work. Ya really need to baby your plants, stimulate new growth...just before you have a spraying "accident."
Don't spray anything.
Our Birds and Bees, Butterflies and Dragonflies will thank you.
Deal with some crabgrass by pouring hot vinegar on it.
Protect our nature.
JMO.