PDA

View Full Version : Drilling holes in stone?



Glen Longino
07-04-2013, 02:43 PM
I need to drill several holes 5/8ths inch diameter and 2" deep into hard limestone rock gateposts.
Steel gate hangers will be driven into the holes.
How should I go about it?
Any advice appreciated.
I need to do this tomorrow!

McMike
07-04-2013, 02:44 PM
Hammer drill and a masonry bit . . . A big one.

StevenBauer
07-04-2013, 02:44 PM
Star drill is the traditional way. Hammer drill would be faster.


Steven

wardd
07-04-2013, 02:45 PM
copper or brass rod and valve grinding compound

works on glass too

takes time but will leave an clean sized hole

Glen Longino
07-04-2013, 02:51 PM
copper or brass rod and valve grinding compound

works on glass too

takes time but will leave an clean sized hole

"takes time"

I don't have that much time!
I'm already 72!:)

wardd
07-04-2013, 02:53 PM
"takes time"

I don't have that much time!
I'm already 72!:)

dynamite

Glen Longino
07-04-2013, 02:55 PM
I've used a hammer drill on concrete with good results but was concerned about splitting stone.
Not to worry?

Glen Longino
07-04-2013, 02:56 PM
dynamite

Have to put a hole in the rock Before the dynamite.

wardd
07-04-2013, 03:37 PM
Have to put a hole in the rock Before the dynamite.


copper or brass rod and valve grinding compound

works on glass too

takes time but will leave a clean hole for dynamite

Flying Orca
07-04-2013, 03:41 PM
Star drill.

BETTY-B
07-04-2013, 03:42 PM
I'd use a rotary drill, Glen. The one I have the most experience with is a combo Bosch. It does just hammer and hammer/drill. Anyways, smaller hammer drills are nice, but just dont have much accuracy or strength. The Bosch will do that job perfectly for you in no time flat. You have to buy special bits, but the results will be well worth it. See if you can find one for rent though. As they are pretty steep in price.

http://www.boschtools.com/Products/Tools/Pages/ItemResults.aspx?catid=1068

Oooh! That link shows some pretty wimpy ones. Bigger is better for this application. This style is what I'm talking about:

http://mdm.boschwebservices.com/files/r20394v33.png

bogdog
07-04-2013, 03:44 PM
Limestone is fairly easy to drill I wouldn't expect a hole that size to take more than a few minutes each with a masonry drill bit.

Glen Longino
07-04-2013, 04:37 PM
Beware limestone is 'soft'.

Although you don't state the size or weight of the gate, make sure that the screws for those hangers are deep and secure enough to support the weight of the gate.

These four gates weigh only 20-25 lbs each, so weight is not the problem.
I'm accustomed to wood gate posts which are no problem at all.
I think I'll rent a hammer drill in the morning. Thanks!

Nicholas Scheuer
07-04-2013, 04:56 PM
Don't hammer-drill near an edge. If the Limestone has a "fault line", it may fracture. You can easily rent a Hammer-Drill and bitts just for the one job.

Waddie
07-04-2013, 05:00 PM
I'd advise waiting a while before you attempt something which could be dangerous. Let your system clean out first so you're not fog-headed or anything.........

oops.......... I thought this thread was about drilling holes while stoned........ my bad...... But after all, it is our country's birthday, and I am celebrating a little before I go and set off several hundred pounds of explosives.......

sheers,
Waddie

David G
07-04-2013, 05:10 PM
Limestone is fairly easy to drill I wouldn't expect a hole that size to take more than a few minutes each with a masonry drill bit.

Yeah... it's not like you're trying to drill into caliche or diamond or something <G>

When I worked in Austin on the convention center - I visited the local rock supplier. They were doing something similar - using a drill much like Dan's foto. They said it was the best rig they'd found, and they still wasted about 1/3 of their limestone blanks. G'luck!

Canoeyawl
07-04-2013, 05:21 PM
It's important to avoid a steel hinge pin in stone or it may split quite easily. "In the old days" they set gate hinges in lead inserts in the stone.
I don't know how they did it, probably just a short piece of lead pipe, but several of the old buildings on Main street have granite door jambs with big pin hinges set in lead (Some of them are large cast bronze hinges, but no one seems to knows it)

This one looks a few hundred years old...

http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8423/7768201118_f7bd46b56a_z.jpg

Chip-skiff
07-04-2013, 05:39 PM
You can buy masonry drills in both rotary and hammer types. I drilled a bunch of holes in concrete (resembles limestone) and liked the hammer drills. I used a big DeWalt 3-speed 18v model, and had a couple batteries charged, in reserve.

I used anchor bolts for concrete. For gate hangers, you might want to drill a bit oversize and put in a lead sleeve.

Don't do it in the noonday sun. :ycool:

Domesticated_Mr. Know It All
07-04-2013, 05:54 PM
I thought you were the expert at drillin Ho's Glen.
That's what Lefty said anyway.

David G
07-04-2013, 06:51 PM
The outfit I talked to said the put the metal hardware in with epoxy. I wouldn't be surprised if lead WAS a better way... but it's probably not as easy for production work.

Ron Williamson
07-04-2013, 06:54 PM
I'd use a rotary drill, Glen. The one I have the most experience with is a combo Bosch. It does just hammer and hammer/drill. Anyways, smaller hammer drills are nice, but just dont have much accuracy or strength. The Bosch will do that job perfectly for you in no time flat. You have to buy special bits, but the results will be well worth it. See if you can find one for rent though. As they are pretty steep in price.

http://www.boschtools.com/Products/Tools/Pages/ItemResults.aspx?catid=1068

Oooh! That link shows some pretty wimpy ones. Bigger is better for this application. This style is what I'm talking about:

http://mdm.boschwebservices.com/files/r20394v33.png

AKA, SDS roto-hammer,around here.
It's what you need.
Rent it.
Let the bit cut.Don't lean on it too much.
If a lead sleeve doesn't suit you,mix up some epoxy and stone dust and goober that mess into the hole.

If you were drilling granite hardheads(there's a reason the glaciers didn't grind them to smithereens),all bets are off.
R

Chip-skiff
07-04-2013, 07:01 PM
One other bit: I used a spray bottle, one of those cheap plastic thingies, with the nozzle loosened so it was yielding a narrow stream, to wash out the rock dust and keep the drill bit cool.

htom
07-04-2013, 07:05 PM
Lead is toxic to sandstone, hinges, and little children who will pull the gate off and eat the soft, squishy, heavy lining. Probably an environmental rule against it somewhere.

wardd
07-04-2013, 07:11 PM
can you drill through?

or at the bottom of the hole chisel out a space for a nut and washer

jackster
07-04-2013, 07:49 PM
Yea, SDS drill (do NOT use the hammer feature, might break the post!) You hook a hose to it for cooling.

And a 5/8" diamond core bit.

coelacanth2
07-04-2013, 08:13 PM
Agree on the hammer drill. I have an absolutely ancient Skil Xtra Tool which can be set as a drill, hammer drill, or pure hammer. It will even eat a hole in very old, hard concrete - quickly. I'd second the use of a lead anchor as well. 2" in to rock? Probably good for a couple of hundred pounds of pull to get it out. Good luck !

Keith Wilson
07-04-2013, 08:25 PM
I'd try an ordinary masonry bit in a regular drill first. Most limestone isn't very hard, and there's less risk of cracking it. You can always try the hammer drill as a plan B. Lead anchors or epoxy, it's probably all one. I have epoxy on hand, so I'd use that.

wardd
07-04-2013, 08:50 PM
the reason lead was used is because as the iron/steel rusted with age the lead would crumble and the swelling of the rusted metal wouldn't damage the stone, epoxy may not behave the same

Paul Girouard
07-04-2013, 09:08 PM
I'd say core bore it, which may mean calling a local concrete cutter who's setup to core bore. IF it where concrete m sure a SDS bit roto hammer would be the way to go. BUT seeing it's limestone , or for that matter any stone , the risk of fracture is always there. The core boring bit's do not hammer the stone and they generally use water to cool the bit.

So for those reasons I look into getting it core bored, if the stone cracks and it's your own post, I guess it's "so what" I'll re-think the process again. But if you where doing the project for dollars and the stone cracking would be a huge issue , I'd core bore it.

I'd also use lead shields, again with epoxy the freeze/ thaw cycles might cause issues. Leads been used , successfully for years , why re-invent the wheel?

I'm sure that will further ice the divide between liberal / progressive and conservative thinking.

Chris Coose
07-04-2013, 09:42 PM
Don't hammer-drill near an edge. If the Limestone has a "fault line", it may fracture. You can easily rent a Hammer-Drill and bitts just for the one job.

Yes.

I bought a nice used hammer drill with a bunch of new bits included. Last week I drilled 6, 3/4" holes to 5" deep in granite. I spent 20 minutes total, drilling those holes.

I blew the holes with compressed air. Dumped an ounce or two of 5 minute epoxie and pounded a cut off galvanized threaded rod into the holes. Then set 4x6 pressure treated posts on them for pilings under the pier.

Peter K
07-05-2013, 12:23 AM
You can buy cheap roto hammer drills here for about $40 - I have been using mine for about a year.
Limestone is childs play for it - no hammering required.
I gave it a hammering chopping lots of holes in good concrete and it seems to be holding up OK!

Curtism
07-05-2013, 05:03 AM
I'd say core bore it, which may mean calling a local concrete cutter who's setup to core bore. IF it where concrete m sure a SDS bit roto hammer would be the way to go. BUT seeing it's limestone , or for that matter any stone , the risk of fracture is always there. The core boring bit's do not hammer the stone and they generally use water to cool the bit.

So for those reasons I look into getting it core bored, if the stone cracks and it's your own post, I guess it's "so what" I'll re-think the process again. But if you where doing the project for dollars and the stone cracking would be a huge issue , I'd core bore it.

I'd also use lead shields, again with epoxy the freeze/ thaw cycles might cause issues. Leads been used , successfully for years , why re-invent the wheel?

I'm sure that will further ice the divide between liberal / progressive and conservative thinking.

I wouldn't say it further ices the (imaginary) divide but it certainly highlights a few aspects of the difference in thinking.

For example, aside from being a Humanitarian, Glen's a progressive and probably gets along well with his neighbors regardless of which teams yard signs they display around election time. And I wouldn't be surprised if, given his approachability, he hasn't already been offered some advice, the use of the proper tools and perhaps even some help getting the holes drilled by someone who knows what they're doing. And being as he's a progressive, he's prolly well aware of his limitations and will graciously accept the help.

Another difference is that he'll offer some sort of compensation for that help, maybe help them with a project in return, and wouldn't just expect additional help the next time he hits a snag.

Another example is, a progressive doesn't (generally) consider themselves the center of the known universe and would (likely) realize that people who live in the heart of Texas don't usually have issues with things such as freeze/thaw cycles. ;)

Glen Longino
07-05-2013, 06:27 AM
I called a friend who had been away to Oklahoma a few days.
He said he has a small hammer drill and a large hammer drill and several bits.
He's meeting me at my job site this morning!

Mrleft8
07-05-2013, 06:43 AM
Glen.... All you need is a masonry bit and a drill. Limestone is soft. Drill it over sived and deeper than you need. put your hinge pins in with a washer and nut on them and "back-fill" the hole with hydraulic cement. You'll be able to use the hinge pins in 15 minutes.

Todd D
07-05-2013, 10:45 AM
limestone is very soft as rocks go. You can even drill it with a normal HSS drill. Limestone is quite a bit softer than steel. Just keep the drill speed down and you won't have a problem. If you want to get fancy you can use a little water to wash out rock dust and keep things cool.

I have cut thousands of rocks and limestone is one of the easiest. As a retired geology professor I know what I am talking about on this one.

Canoeyawl
07-05-2013, 11:07 AM
For example, aside from being a Humanitarian, Another example is, a progressive doesn't (generally) consider themselves the center of the known universe and would (likely) realize that people who live in the heart of Texas don't usually have issues with things such as freeze/thaw cycles. ;)

The first and last time I drove across Texas (a long drive) it was in an old Austin Healey 100-A with a marginal top, no side curtains in November. Two things surprised me, One was that Texas cops (Glen...) will not hesitate to handcuff you to the chain link fence while they disassemble your car, and the other more notable thing was that it was 22 at night and I near froze to death.

Paul Pless
07-05-2013, 11:42 AM
One was that Texas cops (Glen...) will not hesitate to handcuff you to the chain link fence while they disassemble your cartexas is no place for long haired hippie types. . .

Glen Longino
07-05-2013, 12:22 PM
Well, my friend brought his big hammer drill to the job this morning.
I had marked all the holes yesterday and had them all drilled easily by 8:30 this morning.
Thanks for all the good advice!
Thanks even for the bad advice, wardd (brass rod and valve grinding compound...or dynamite)!:)

brad9798
07-05-2013, 02:24 PM
HAMMER drill ... it should take you about 15 minutes to drill whatever u need!

brad9798
07-05-2013, 02:25 PM
Oh, oops ... I see you've already done it, Glen! See how easy it is with the hammer? :D

Glen Longino
07-05-2013, 02:33 PM
Oh, oops ... I see you've already done it, Glen! See how easy it is with the hammer? :D

:)Thanks, Brad, your heart is in the right place...it's your Brain what is mislocated about 3 feet south of it's intended position!:D
But what the, hell so is mine!:)
Cheers!

brad9798
07-06-2013, 05:29 PM
Ouch ... not sure what you meant by that ... :eek:

Glen Longino
07-06-2013, 06:01 PM
Didn't mean anything by it, Brad...just a silly jab at a buddy!

Canoeyawl
07-06-2013, 09:27 PM
texas is no place for long haired hippie types. . .

Or Texans, they really should give it back to Mexico.

David G
07-06-2013, 10:23 PM
Still no fotos? I think this was all just a hellucination brought on by too much agave nectar, and WAY too much heat!

Glen Longino
07-06-2013, 10:31 PM
:)If I posted pics of all my work I'd be an instant hero around here rather than an outcast.
I'd be endlessly praised rather than constantly ridiculed, and frankly, I don't think I could stand the sudden change!:)
Here's another Pussers for you and a Herradura for me...oops, this ain't Lefty's Pub!

David G
07-06-2013, 10:51 PM
Thassalright... I'll take the rum anyhoo! And some fotos please!

Syed
07-07-2013, 03:46 AM
Still no fotos? I think this was all just a hellucination brought on by too much agave nectar, and WAY too much heat!

+ 1 ;)

Mrleft8
07-07-2013, 08:09 AM
Do they have digital cameras in Texas yet, or are they still using 4X5 silver nitrate plates?

David G
07-07-2013, 10:55 AM
C'mon you Humanitarian... take pity on us plebes!

Besides... you're ALREADY a hero around here... amongst the cognoscenti <G>

Glen Longino
07-07-2013, 12:12 PM
Do they have digital cameras in Texas yet, or are they still using 4X5 silver nitrate plates?

Cameras? Ha! Texans make pictographs with charcoal and ochre on cave walls.
Who needs cameras?;)

Glen Longino
07-07-2013, 12:36 PM
..."cognoscenti"...

I've been banned for using that kind of language around here!
I hope nobody pushes the button on you!:)
Seriously, I do hope to get some pics up here soon.
I've really appreciated other member's pics over the years.

Michael D. Storey
07-08-2013, 09:50 AM
dynamite

Thought he was dead.