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pcford
05-29-2013, 11:29 PM
Who needs certifications for tech support and sales if you can land a gig as an Apple (http://www.dice.com/jobsearch/company/DiceId_applecup/Apple+Inc./?icid-dicenews) Genius? Gizmodo recently got its hands on an Apple Genius Training manual and it’s a hoot. The book and a 14-day training course teach Geniuses-to-be about becoming a politician, psychologist, technician and sales rep all balled up into one.
What to Say, or Not For starters, the manual lists specific words to avoid in order to prompt customers to say, “yes.” A peek:



Do not use: “bomb,” “crash,” or “bug”
Avoid: “freeze”
Use: “unexpectedly quits,” “does not respond,” or “stops responding”

How to Say it One of Apple’s “Empathy Exercises” sections delves into ways to deliver the words. Every genius should practice the the “Fs” – “Feel,” “Felt,” “Found.”
In one scenario, a customer says: “I want an iPad, but I need a mouse. I can’t deal with all this touching.”
How to respond? Geniuses use the three Fs to say: “I may know how you feel. I’m a mouse fan and felt as if I’d never get used to it, but I found it becomes very easy with a little practice.”
Reading the Customer As the Genius talks, they’re supposed to keep a close eye on reading your body language. Beware of their hawk eyes. For example, here’s what your body language may be saying:


Cooperation – Tilted head, hand-on-face gestures and unbuttoned coat
Acceptance – Moving in closer, touching, hand to chest
Frustration – Fist-like gestures, Palm to back of neck and kicking at the ground or an imaginary object.
Boredom – Blank stare, drumming on table

Don’t Let Bored Customers Get You Down There’s also a lengthy list of “We” inspirational instructions that border on evangelical gospel. See if you’re moved enough to chant:


We guide every interaction
We help them discover
We enrich their lives
We deliver enriching experiences
We strive to inspire

Feel the love?
from Dice.com

seanz
05-29-2013, 11:52 PM
Interesting sales culture.

Nicholas Carey
05-30-2013, 12:29 AM
What's so odd about that? Anybody who's ever worked any sort of customer/tech support role knows that to succeed at the job, you have to be all of "politician, psychologist, technician and sales rep." Fixing the problem is just one aspect of the job. Fixing the customer is an even more important aspect of the job.

You might not be able to fix the customer's problem at all, at least not in the short term. But a little empathy goes a long way towards making the customer happy. And happy customers are loyal, repeat customers. As far as the sales aspect goes, sometimes the customer doesn't really have a problem. Her problem is that she doesn't have the right tool for the job, so you've got to sell them on that. This cuts both ways, though: the customer might think they need $1000 worth of Photoshop, when what they really need is $79 worth of Photoshop Elements. You might lose the $900 on the one sale, but the word of mouth recommendations bring in additional customers.

pcford
05-30-2013, 12:50 AM
What's so odd about that? Anybody who's ever worked any sort of customer/tech support role knows that to succeed at the job, you have to be all of "politician, psychologist, technician and sales rep." Fixing the problem is just one aspect of the job. Fixing the customer is an even more important aspect of the job.

You might not be able to fix the customer's problem at all, at least not in the short term. But a little empathy goes a long way towards making the customer happy. And happy customers are loyal, repeat customers. As far as the sales aspect goes, sometimes the customer doesn't really have a problem. Her problem is that she doesn't have the right tool for the job, so you've got to sell them on that. This cuts both ways, though: the customer might think they need $1000 worth of Photoshop, when what they really need is $79 worth of Photoshop Elements. You might lose the $900 on the one sale, but the word of mouth recommendations bring in additional customers.

Not a bit of Mac Cult here...nothing to see here folks...move along now.

Osborne Russell
05-30-2013, 01:48 AM
Words, bah. I want sex and drugs like in Brave New World.

hokiefan
05-30-2013, 02:07 AM
What's so odd about that? Anybody who's ever worked any sort of customer/tech support role knows that to succeed at the job, you have to be all of "politician, psychologist, technician and sales rep." Fixing the problem is just one aspect of the job. Fixing the customer is an even more important aspect of the job.

You might not be able to fix the customer's problem at all, at least not in the short term. But a little empathy goes a long way towards making the customer happy. And happy customers are loyal, repeat customers. As far as the sales aspect goes, sometimes the customer doesn't really have a problem. Her problem is that she doesn't have the right tool for the job, so you've got to sell them on that. This cuts both ways, though: the customer might think they need $1000 worth of Photoshop, when what they really need is $79 worth of Photoshop Elements. You might lose the $900 on the one sale, but the word of mouth recommendations bring in additional customers.


Not a bit of Mac Cult here...nothing to see here folks...move along now.

I agree with Nicholas, its simply good customer service training. Successful companies do it every day. And before you spout off I've never owned an Apple device in my life.

Cheers,

Bobby

SchoonerRat
05-30-2013, 08:54 AM
Pat,

Just for comparison sake, could you please post excerpts from the training manuals for the HP Genius Bar, or the Dell Genius Bar, or Acer's?

Have you ever used the Apple Genius Bar? I thought not.

Yes, the geniuses who staff the bar may know less about fixing Macs than you do, but the system works. Each "Genius" is connected to a real genius by iPad. The remote genius tells the in store genius what questions to ask, what solutions to try, whether or not the machine is covered by warranty. The genius behind the iPad is trained to diagnose and fix Mac hardware and software. The genius in front of the iPad is trained to deal with the customer. I see an efficient working solution where you see a major flaw in the service policy of Apple Computer.

For God's sake Pat. Live and let live. Unlike political decisions that affect your daily life, somebody choosing Mac over PC has ABSOLUTELY NO EFFECT on you...good or bad. People who buy Macs do so because they like them better than the alternatives. You have a compulsion to tell Mac owners what idiots they are every time you find a news article that seems to support your position. It irks you to no end that so many people don't agree with you.

Do you really think you're going to convert Mac owners to PC owners with these posts? Are you just trying to make PC owners feel better about their choice? Or maybe you're trying to convince yourself that you are right.

Me thinks thou doest protest too much!

Dan McCosh
05-30-2013, 11:29 AM
I was at a "genius bar" once, and the guy behind, holding an iphone and talking to a customer, said. "This has been washed and dried."

John of Phoenix
05-30-2013, 11:35 AM
I am decidedly NOT an Apple fan but no one can deny their success.

Old Dryfoot
05-30-2013, 11:36 AM
Yeah this is really nothing more than corporate customer service...

Captain Intrepid
05-30-2013, 01:41 PM
I was once intensely concerned with the Mac vrs. PC debate. Of course, I was about 12 years old then and had the maturity of a sour plum.

Joe (SoCal)
05-30-2013, 01:57 PM
I just came back from Home Depot to look for a facets for the greenhouse slop sink. After my initial search and only finding the $180 moen I reluctantly went to customer service. The lady said well if we can't locate it in the store we will look for it online. I looked at her and said listen here Google, if I had wanted to purchase the item online I could have done that myself I know how to search the Internet and I probably would have bought it from one of your cheaper cometitors, I'm here cause I have a plumber coming at 3:00 pm do I LOOK like I want to wait for the free p&h ? Needless to say they were out of stock on the item I needed. Ended up going to a pluming supply store 2 sec and no online later I walked away with the needed part.

I went to Apple with a problem with one of my iPhones. The genius took my iPhone synced it with a BRAND NEW IPHONE and handed me the NEW iPhone and said thank you for being an apple customer. Same thing happened with my $3,000 PowerBook. I just call that amazing customer service.

John of Phoenix
05-30-2013, 02:14 PM
I went to Apple with a problem with one of my iPhones. The genius took my iPhone synced it with a BRAND NEW IPHONE and handed me the NEW iPhone and said thank you for being an apple customer. Same thing happened with my $3,000 PowerBook. I just call that amazing customer service.You may have finally gotten your money's worth. :D

Breakaway
05-30-2013, 07:25 PM
That's old school ( and still largely applicable stuff). I first came across it in Dale Carnegie, and Tom Hopkins in the 70's. Of course thier books were published long before that...

Kevin

pcford
05-30-2013, 11:19 PM
That's old school ( and still largely applicable stuff). I first came across it in Dale Carnegie, and Tom Hopkins in the 70's. Of course thier books were published long before that...

Kevin


hmmm. Seems more like est...werner erhard (aka Jack Rosenberg) stuff. Phony 70s training scam. Jobs was involved with flakey California "philosophy."

http://www.rickross.com/reference/est/est36.html

pcford
05-30-2013, 11:25 PM
I was at a "genius bar" once, and the guy behind, holding an iphone and talking to a customer, said. "This has been washed and dried."

Funny. Within the last couple days, Apple settled a lawsuit for refusing service claiming devices had been exposed to moisture. Cost them $53 million.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887323855804578511720535072276.html?m od=googlenews_wsj

Yes....Genius Bar...

pcford
06-03-2013, 12:39 PM
For God's sake Pat. Live and let live. Unlike political decisions that affect your daily life, somebody choosing Mac over PC has ABSOLUTELY NO EFFECT on you...good or bad. People who buy Macs do so because they like them better than the alternatives. You have a compulsion to tell Mac owners what idiots they are every time you find a news article that seems to support your position. It irks you to no end that so many people don't agree with you.


"Live and let live..."...you have precisely made my point. It does have an effective on me. Until recently if you stated you were doing "creative work" with a Windows machine, Mac people would look at you like you arrived with your diapers full. Face it, there is a huge amount of undeserved smug elitism on the part of Mac owners. Apple brand marketing has long worked that angle.

I want to be judged on the quality of my work and not on whether or not I have a partially eaten fruit logo on my computer.

Mac snobbism is lessening. First, because their machines are risibly out of date: Mac Pros have not been updated in two years. Also, Apple has shown itself to be just another extremely greedy company: Chinese slave labor, huge pile of stock cash it holds instead of returning to stock owners, stock manipulation to slow down price crash, lawsuit over service problem and today Apple is in court defending price fixing charges. It's just another American corporation.

Use what you like. I will use a more modern alternative.

S/V Laura Ellen
06-03-2013, 12:53 PM
It would not surprise me that Apple will soon get out of the PC/Laptop market.
The growth for Apple is the mobile phone/tablet side of the house.

I personally hope that is not he case, we need the competition in the PC/Laptop O/S market.

pcford
06-03-2013, 01:09 PM
It would not surprise me that Apple will soon get out of the PC/Laptop market.
The growth for Apple is the mobile phone/tablet side of the house.

I personally hope that is not he case, we need the competition in the PC/Laptop O/S market.

I agree totally. However, the money is not in making editing workstations for a few thousand bedraggled video editors. The money is in making gadgets for the millions. But building personal computers for the graphic arts is where Apple built its brand. In my humble opinion, the best thing that Apple could do for marketing is to pay attention to the Mac Pro line. Not that they would necessarily make money there. However, it would return some credibility to the brand.