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John Smith
05-22-2013, 07:25 AM
I had the idea after Katrina that evacuating a city means more than just telling people to leave. They need a place to go and a means to get there.

My thought was to build some large and strategically located shelters. I'm sure there are some built in logistical problems, but it seems to me that if we wish to evacuate an area it would be a good idea if we have a safe place for the people to go and buses to get them there.

David W Pratt
05-22-2013, 08:43 AM
I was surprised to learn that houses and schools did not have storm cellars.

John Smith
05-22-2013, 09:10 AM
It would seem that this will be similar to post Sandy where homes in some areas will have to be raised in order to be rebuilt.

David W Pratt
05-22-2013, 10:29 AM
Norman:
About 60 seconds of internet searching turned up a company that makes prefab, above ground shelters. One for 25 adults runs about $6500
Seems reasonable, you can, evidently, move them too

S.V. Airlie
05-22-2013, 10:35 AM
maintenance! who covers upkeep when not in use? guards, insurance....who pays?

Michael D. Storey
05-22-2013, 10:36 AM
I was surprised to learn that houses and schools did not have storm cellars.

Storm cellars are not always that easy. Florida & Louisiana? high water table means much under ground will fill with water and snakes. Texas? Lotta clay, which will expand and contract with the rain and the drought, which unsettles the foundation. Also, big-capacity shelters need sanitary, ventilation, etc.
There are ways to do this but it is not simple. Remember, even NYC closed the subways during Sandy, for fear of flooding and disaster to people hiding out in them.

BETTY-B
05-22-2013, 12:20 PM
Norman:
About 60 seconds of internet searching turned up a company that makes prefab, above ground shelters. One for 25 adults runs about $6500
Seems reasonable, you can, evidently, move them too

Certainly reasonable, but completely irrelevant since the Republicans in Oklahoma alone have cut public school funding by over twenty percent in the last five years. They could always buy a few less books and lower teachers pay to cover it though. Except that the Republican state school superintendent says they already need $300 million. Oopsies.

S.V. Airlie
05-22-2013, 01:10 PM
already asked..no answer.

David W Pratt
05-22-2013, 03:32 PM
For individual houses, the owners. If you are a landlord, I would expect you could charge a little extra on the rent for having a shelter. The company makes smaller, cheaper versions as well. For a public school, of, say 250 students, eleven or twelve of the $6500 shelters would probably be a small % increase in the cost of the school. Maybe buying in bulk would get a discount. For a school, the movability wouldn't be a need, further bringing down the cost.

Garrett Lowell
05-22-2013, 03:53 PM
Sounds like this isn't disaster response, but disaster preparation. Most locations in the US already have large, heavily constructed public buildings that can act as shelters in an emergency.

S.V. Airlie
05-22-2013, 04:27 PM
For individual houses, the owners. If you are a landlord, I would expect you could charge a little extra on the rent for having a shelter. The company makes smaller, cheaper versions as well. For a public school, of, say 250 students, eleven or twelve of the $6500 shelters would probably be a small % increase in the cost of the school. Maybe buying in bulk would get a discount. For a school, the movability wouldn't be a need, further bringing down the cost.i suspect this would not work in new orleans

SMARTINSEN
05-22-2013, 04:32 PM
simple inclusion of clips and straps that tie the roof to the exterior walls, and tie the walls to the foundations

I am pretty sure that this is a code requirement in most new residential construction. I know that we have to do it here in MD, with the elevated risk of hurricanes along the shore, and it has been a requirement in FL for a long time, and I would be very surprised if this was not already a requirement in tornado alley.



About 60 seconds of internet searching turned up a company that makes prefab, above ground shelters.

I had to get a tire fixed yesterday, and the mechanic told me that this would be a terrific short term stock market play.

BETTY-B
05-22-2013, 05:17 PM
I am pretty sure that this is a code requirement in most new residential construction. I know that we have to do it here in MD, with the elevated risk of hurricanes along the shore, and it has been a requirement in FL for a long time, and I would be very surprised if this was not already a requirement in tornado alley.

I cant find anything on residential tornado codes in Oklahoma. They do consider land-use regulations an unnecessary government intrusion and leave it up to the individual school districts to make the decisions as to whether safe rooms for the students is needed or not. Reading that leads me to believe they must not have any codes for residential.

hokiefan
05-22-2013, 05:28 PM
There is really little point trying to upgrade a standard home to withstand a tornado. Ain't happening. The upgrading for hurricanes helps, but hurricanes are an entirely different beast. At work we had a reinforced concrete blockhouse, 2 feet thick, tons of rebar, thick foundation built the same way. Would hold everyone on site including contractors and truck drivers. Ugly, but would be quite attractive when needed. The airports and stores around here have tornado shelters built into the restrooms. Maybe schools should do that as well.

Cheers,

Bobby

John Smith
05-22-2013, 05:31 PM
Sounds like this isn't disaster response, but disaster preparation. Most locations in the US already have large, heavily constructed public buildings that can act as shelters in an emergency.

LIke the Superdome?

There's not a lot of warning for a tornado.

Somewhere comes the question: why keep rebuilding if Mother Nature keeps knocking it down?

I'm a bit puzzled, response wise, as why Congress needs to act for relief money to come. I would think the president should have the authority to commit some pre-set amount on his own.

John Smith
05-22-2013, 05:32 PM
I cant find anything on residential tornado codes in Oklahoma. They do consider land-use regulations an unnecessary government intrusion and leave it up to the individual school districts to make the decisions as to weather safe rooms for the students is needed or not. Reading that leads me to believe they must not have any codes for residential.

We don't need no damned codes. What could possibly go wrong?